T Nation

Bench and OHP Form CHeck

Hey Guys

So I recently decided after some advice given to m on a previous post to switch from my 7 month Calisthenics routine to 5/3/1. I am already pretty proficient at the technique for the Deadlift and Squat because I have been doing them for the last 3 months after readding Rippetoe’s SS. But I have never did OHP and have not benched in a long ass time. I decided to do some low weight high volume training to get the technique down.

My first lift was this past Thursday. Although when I benched and OHP i just felt super awkward throughout the movement. SO I decided to record my last few sets for critique. SO let me know if I am doing it wrong, what I should be doing,etc. Also on my OHP I feel that I am not pushing the bar on a vertical path…thoughts? THanks

Bench

Bench2

Bench - looks ok (not really my forte)

OHP: Simply put, you are not yet flexible enough to do it properly yet.
1: when racked, your elbows and forearms were behind the bar = poor force transfer, loss of strength, unable to support a decent racked weight
2: At the top, your shoulders aren’t locked back and above your head. Your arms end up at the same angle relative to your torso as they would on an incline bench.

I would recommend getting the Starting strength Ebook, or at least studying the diagrams of the OHP to get a better idea.
Do plenty of shoulder dislocations with a broom stick (50+ a day), and this


Keep everything below your Thoraic spine locked and straight, feet closer together. I’d say you’re leaning to much from your lower back at the moment.

[quote]caveman101 wrote:
OHP: Simply put, you are not yet flexible enough to do it properly yet.
1: when racked, your elbows and forearms were behind the bar = poor force transfer, loss of strength, unable to support a decent racked weight
2: At the top, your shoulders aren’t locked back and above your head. Your arms end up at the same angle relative to your torso as they would on an incline bench. [/quote]

For sure these things. I’d be very surprised if it was a flexibility issue though. I bet he’s probably just not thinking about doing those things. Until you get it down pat you’ll have to consciously think about getting your arms under the bar and pulling your head under the bar once it’s high enough.

[quote]csulli wrote:

[quote]caveman101 wrote:
OHP: Simply put, you are not yet flexible enough to do it properly yet.
1: when racked, your elbows and forearms were behind the bar = poor force transfer, loss of strength, unable to support a decent racked weight
2: At the top, your shoulders aren’t locked back and above your head. Your arms end up at the same angle relative to your torso as they would on an incline bench. [/quote]

For sure these things. I’d be very surprised if it was a flexibility issue though. I bet he’s probably just not thinking about doing those things. Until you get it down pat you’ll have to consciously think about getting your arms under the bar and pulling your head under the bar once it’s high enough.[/quote]

As far as 1 is concerned, won’t that sort of work its way out once you start adding weight to the bar? Since you’re sort of forced to figure out how to keep the bar racked?

you’d be surprised how many people don’t/can’t rack the bar or keep their elbows under the bar

[quote]caveman101 wrote:
Bench - looks ok (not really my forte)

OHP: Simply put, you are not yet flexible enough to do it properly yet.
1: when racked, your elbows and forearms were behind the bar = poor force transfer, loss of strength, unable to support a decent racked weight
2: At the top, your shoulders aren’t locked back and above your head. Your arms end up at the same angle relative to your torso as they would on an incline bench.

I would recommend getting the Starting strength Ebook, or at least studying the diagrams of the OHP to get a better idea.
Do plenty of shoulder dislocations with a broom stick (50+ a day), and this


Keep everything below your Thoraic spine locked and straight, feet closer together. I’d say you’re leaning to much from your lower back at the moment.[/quote]

Thanks for the response guys…I actually just ordered starting strength hard copy like a few days ago so it should be coming in soon. I also recently started doing shoulder dislocations but in between my sets…is that okay? Or should I not be doing them during my lifts

I prefer before my sessions but I don’t see how doing a FEW would hurt you. Best thing for increasing the rack position in my opinion is to set a bar bell up in a squat rack around your rack height, grab hold of the bar where you would grab to press and then slowly keep walking into the bar forcing your elbows up slowly and getting a good stretch. Will help tons.

[quote]Reed wrote:
I prefer before my sessions but I don’t see how doing a FEW would hurt you. Best thing for increasing the rack position in my opinion is to set a bar bell up in a squat rack around your rack height, grab hold of the bar where you would grab to press and then slowly keep walking into the bar forcing your elbows up slowly and getting a good stretch. Will help tons.[/quote]

Ok thanks but I’m a little confused what you guys mean by the " rack" position
Is that when I am taking the bar out of the rack/ my setup??? Thanks

“The Rack” position is where the bar sits on your chest when your holding it right before you begin the upward push. Basically where you would hold the bar if you were resting between reps. Hope that makes since. I can’t see the videos unfortunately for some reason so I am pretty much going off what everyone above is saying.

99% of the time I agree with Caveman so I’m willingly to bet he is correct about this as well. Basically your problem is your not able to get your elbows in the right position to generate maximum power and leverage.

Essentially if you racked a Bar getting ready to press your forearm going into you elbow is making a slightly angled line back toward your body. This is causing you to basically push up and away from you while your triceps are in a horrible position to do a standing press. Pretty sure someone said its almost like your trying to start with the same angle as when you do a incline press.

You wanna get you flexibility to where you can get your forearms to be essentially straight up and down maybe even have your elbows pointed just slightly out and away from you. This will put you in a much stronger starting “Rack”. Look up Mark Rippetoes his to overhead press on YouTube. Its a pretty good video and will help you kinda understand everything I just threw at you.

[quote]Reed wrote:
“The Rack” position is where the bar sits on your chest when your holding it right before you begin the upward push. Basically where you would hold the bar if you were resting between reps. Hope that makes since. I can’t see the videos unfortunately for some reason so I am pretty much going off what everyone above is saying.

99% of the time I agree with Caveman so I’m willingly to bet he is correct about this as well. Basically your problem is your not able to get your elbows in the right position to generate maximum power and leverage.

Essentially if you racked a Bar getting ready to press your forearm going into you elbow is making a slightly angled line back toward your body. This is causing you to basically push up and away from you while your triceps are in a horrible position to do a standing press. Pretty sure someone said its almost like your trying to start with the same angle as when you do a incline press.

You wanna get you flexibility to where you can get your forearms to be essentially straight up and down maybe even have your elbows pointed just slightly out and away from you. This will put you in a much stronger starting “Rack”. Look up Mark Rippetoes his to overhead press on YouTube. Its a pretty good video and will help you kinda understand everything I just threw at you. [/quote]

Oo gotcha yah when I am in the rack position my elbows are really close to my body and against my late. So should my elbows be up and out so when I push it linear?

Yes more or less. Also remember to move in a line straight up and move your head and body around the barbell not the barbell around your body.

[quote]Reed wrote:
Yes more or less. Also remember to move in a line straight up and move your head and body around the barbell not the barbell around your body.[/quote]

Ok so I was practicing this and in order for me to have my elbows out and arms vertical the bar end up not resting on my chest but hovering in front of me… Is this just lack of flexibility… Do u need a picture of it? Cus it’s kinda buggin me thanks

If your doing a strict overhead press that hover your talking about is perfectly fine some guys especially thicker less flexible guys some start almost at chin level. It will improve with time but that is what your looking for. Would be happy to look at photo to make sure but you sound like you have it. But you should have found yourself stronger in that position.

[quote]Reed wrote:
If your doing a strict overhead press that hover your talking about is perfectly fine some guys especially thicker less flexible guys some start almost at chin level. It will improve with time but that is what your looking for. Would be happy to look at photo to make sure but you sound like you have it. But you should have found yourself stronger in that position.[/quote]

Yah I felt wayyy tighter and stronger doing that and watching rippertoe tutorial on YouTube helped a bunch.

Glad I could help man. Good luck and press hard.

I know I still struggle with it once I get fatigued–my elbows go all over the damn place. It isn’t as easy as it sounds (at least for me).

idk why?