T Nation

Beginner Workout


#1

6 day workout split…just tell me if i will get results if i follow this along with good nutrition
Day 1 - Chest and Abs
Day 2 - Back (including deadlifts)
Day 3 - Shoulders and Abs
Day 4 -Triceps
Day 5 - Legs (including squats) and Abs
Day 6 - Biceps
and daily cardio
and which supplements shall i use


#2

Condense it into a Full body workout 3 times a week. Include the primary lifts per day Squat-bench-deadlift.

If you’re really feeling it, add fourth day to concentrate on your arms and do things that you feel are important to you.


#3

Do you train in a gym? Are there big, experienced guys there?


#4

Biceps and triceps do not need individual days, if you really need to do arms then combine them. As far as supplements go, food, food and more food. I think you should really just pick a program from this site or some other beginner template and avoid the bro split.


#5

Stronglifts 5x5 is a great place to start.


#6

[quote]Deepgoat wrote:
Stronglifts 5x5 is a great place to start.[/quote]
Why?


#7

[quote]LoRez wrote:

[quote]Deepgoat wrote:
Stronglifts 5x5 is a great place to start.[/quote]
Why?[/quote]

because everyone on internet forums says so, regardless of what your goals are


#8

What I did when I looked like you (and yes, I did look a lot like you when I started) was this:

Monday

  1. squat, 5x5-8 - 120 seconds rest
    2a. incline DB press, 5x5-8 - 90 seconds rest
    2b. row (cable, barbell, dumbbell), 5x5-8 - 90 seconds rest

Wednesday

  1. rack pull, 5x5-8 - 120 seconds rest
    2a. overhead press, 5x5-8 - 90 seconds rest
    2b. chinup, 5x5-8 - 90 seconds rest

Friday: like Monday

You will train three times a week, alternating between the two workouts. You will do the first exercise in straight sets, the last two in an alternating fashion. Whenever you get 5x8, add five pounds. always try to improve.

If you do this for several months and eat enough, that’ll easily be your first 10-20 pounds gained. Seriously, the plan you posted above might work but it won’t work as well.


#9

[quote]nighthawkz wrote:
What I did when I looked like you (and yes, I did look a lot like you when I started) was this:

Monday

  1. squat, 5x5-8 - 120 seconds rest
    2a. incline DB press, 5x5-8 - 90 seconds rest
    2b. row (cable, barbell, dumbbell), 5x5-8 - 90 seconds rest

Wednesday

  1. rack pull, 5x5-8 - 120 seconds rest
    2a. overhead press, 5x5-8 - 90 seconds rest
    2b. chinup, 5x5-8 - 90 seconds rest

Friday: like Monday

You will train three times a week, alternating between the two workouts. You will do the first exercise in straight sets, the last two in an alternating fashion. Whenever you get 5x8, add five pounds. always try to improve.

If you do this for several months and eat enough, that’ll easily be your first 10-20 pounds gained. Seriously, the plan you posted above might work but it won’t work as well.[/quote]

I feel like this is like 2 thirds of a really good beginner workout.

The kid clearly wants to get swole so I’d add:

-Triceps and lateral delts exercise on day A (just one exercise for each)
-Rear delts and biceps stuff on day B (again, just a single exercise for each)
-Leg Press and abs both days


#10

Don’t be a whiney idiot. Stronglifts 5x5 is a good place to start because it has a high rep scheme, practices core movements often and develops a strong “base”. What else could you possibly ask for when you’re a beginner.


#11

[quote]Deepgoat wrote:
Don’t be a whiney idiot. Stronglifts 5x5 is a good place to start because it has a high rep scheme, practices core movements often and develops a strong “base”. What else could you possibly ask for when you’re a beginner.
[/quote]

Did you mean a low rep scheme, or am I misunderstanding you?


#12

I actually had to stop and ask myself for a moment as well… There are two types of beginners. The ones who think doing infinitix20 with light weight and then the ones who think 1x2 topset is where they want to be. Could we agree upon it being a comfortable medium? 25 reps of squats bench and rows is a bit of volume for a beginner who is using reasonable weights compared to strength.


#13

[quote]Deepgoat wrote:
Don’t be a whiney idiot. Stronglifts 5x5 is a good place to start because it has a high rep scheme, practices core movements often and develops a strong “base”. What else could you possibly ask for when you’re a beginner.
[/quote]

Just off the top of my head:

-A varied rep scheme
-An understanding of sound training principles
-An element of autoregulation

Probably plenty of other things as well.


#14

[quote]Deepgoat wrote:
Don’t be a whiney idiot. Stronglifts 5x5 is a good place to start because it has a high rep scheme, practices core movements often and develops a strong “base”. What else could you possibly ask for when you’re a beginner.
[/quote]
I wanted to reply but I found myself unable to argue with your profile pic…

pew! pew!


#15

Aside from a verified rep scheme I can’t understand how you wouldn’t get the others from stronglifts.


#16

[quote]Deepgoat wrote:
Aside from a verified rep scheme I can’t understand how you wouldn’t get the others from stronglifts.[/quote]
How is stronglifts autoregulating?


#17

[quote]Deepgoat wrote:
Don’t be a whiney idiot. Stronglifts 5x5 is a good place to start because it has a high rep scheme, practices core movements often and develops a strong “base”. What else could you possibly ask for when you’re a beginner.
[/quote]

I see that you’re fairly new here, so I don’t blame you for starting out with this position. It’s where a whole bunch of people stand when they start chatting about this stuff online. And frankly, pretty much where I stood when I started posting here, although I didn’t engage much in the beginner forum at that time.

So, to catch you up - this same basic discussion has unfolded more than a few times here. Beginner shows up, asks for program, and basically gets told to do Rippetoe / StrongLifts / some other linear progression program based around the big three lifts.

Here’s the rub. All of the basic linear-progression programs can be a good starting point, but they’re not the only way of getting started, and they have their own drawbacks, too. I still think a few weeks of doing something like StrongLifts is a fine way to learn technique on the big lifts, learn to move some weight, get some fundamentals down like consistency and showing up and putting in work. But for a kid who wants to get swole and build a beach bod, there is nothing wrong with a split, either.

Ultimately, the success of the trainee will be dictated by their effort (not just in the weight room, either, but also in getting enough food, sleep, and so on). Whether a beginner does StrongLifts or a bodypart split, if the effort isn’t there, they will fail. And if the effort is there, they will eventually (perhaps after some fits and starts and learning by trial and error) succeed.

Many beginners who are starting out with StrongLifts-esque programs will start out, make a little progress early, then hit a point somewhere between 135 and 185 pounds where the weight starts to get heavy, and they stall. Yes, I know that the programs have a strategy written to get past said stall. But this almost seems to become a self-defeating mechanism. The trainee feels the weight getting heavy, wonders if they’re getting close to the stall…and then they stall. So they reset, drop the weight, start building back up…and they stall again around the same point. You don’t have to look hard for examples of this, there are probably some on the first page of this very forum.

The problem with this guy is not the program. It’s the effort, intensity, whatever you want to call it. He/she hasn’t learned to really push him/herself in the gym. I don’t know how to explain it, but has anyone here ever watched someone fail a lift and think “That’s weird, it doesn’t even look like they’re trying that hard?”

Further, by starting on such a limited program, the novice has confined themselves to an extremely limited knowledge base - they don’t have a CLUE what to try next. I’m a believer in keeping things simple, and my training these days is extremely minimalist (deadlifts, pullups, and kettlebell swings probably account for 75 percent of my training ATM) but there is a lot of value in tasting a few different things, experimenting, learning how your body responds to different exercises and programs and implements. I actually think that the novice likely benefits from that quite substantially.

And with that, I’ll leave this for more accomplished people to debate for the next 17 pages that are no doubt coming. But it’s probably at least worth acknowledging that the generic linear progression programs are not the only way of doing things in this business, and they’re probably not the optimal one-size-fits-all approach for every new person lifting weights.


#18

I never stated nor do I believe linear programs are the only way. To the guy who poses the question “How does strong lifts auto regulate” Try to squat a weight that is too heavy, you miss it, you lower it. Autoregulate. I agree, I meant it as a beginning tool to learn the big three and build some sort of strength. I doubt a beginner would go more than a few months without stalling. But in a few months of being in the gym there is no doubt you would pick up on a few things, visit a few websites, ask a few people. Hell, if you’re lucky someone would see your terrible form and give you a few pointers.

As a powerlifter I prefer 5x5, muscle stability/control and learning proper extension is, to me, the highest priority for a beginner.


#19

would you recommend stronglifts if I had decided to take up the sport of bodybuilding?


#20

[quote]Deepgoat wrote:
I never stated nor do I believe linear programs are the only way. To the guy who poses the question “How does strong lifts auto regulate” Try to squat a weight that is too heavy, you miss it, you lower it. Autoregulate. I agree, I meant it as a beginning tool to learn the big three and build some sort of strength. I doubt a beginner would go more than a few months without stalling. But in a few months of being in the gym there is no doubt you would pick up on a few things, visit a few websites, ask a few people. Hell, if you’re lucky someone would see your terrible form and give you a few pointers.

As a powerlifter I prefer 5x5, muscle stability/control and learning proper extension is, to me, the highest priority for a beginner.[/quote]

Do you follow any sort of peaking protocol for a meet, or just stick with the 5x5 the whole way through and deload the week of?