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Beginner Prep School Assistance Circuit

#1

Just a few questions from the forever book.

  1. Without giving too much away, the book lists out two sample assistance circuits. Should I do Circuit 1 during Deadlift/Press days then Circuit 2 during Squat/Bench days?

  2. I already do pushups and pullups during the main lifts, should I still do the push ups and chin ups prescribed in Circuit 1? Supersetting the pushups and pullups during the main lifts have really increased my work capacity and I would still like to continue doing them.

Thanks for any answers.

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#2
  1. You can choose which ever one you want - I don’t think it really matters which one you do on a particular day.

  2. Yes. I’ve been training for 30+ years and still do push-ups, chins/pull-ups, bodyweight squats and jump rope, etc. Don’t be fooled by the gloss of idiots.

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#3

Will do! Thanks a lot, Jim!

#4

few questions please

-the book says push-ups during the main work of the squat but I guess they should be done between the main work of the deadlift also!? I do it this way!?

-I always alternate between the two circuits but if I want to go a bit more in detail, whats “smarter” in your opinion. Should I do the circuit with the squat on my deadlift day and the swings on the squat day or the other way around and the circuit on with the squat on squat days and the swings on deadlift day?

-you wrote in the book that in general high school males use a 53 pound kettlebell for swings on average, depending on the strength level of the athlete… what weights do you seen using kids on the DB-squat in this program on average? Can you throw some numbers around from weak to very strong for the circuits?

thanks

#5

It doesn’t matter.

you wrote in the book that in general high school males use a 53 pound kettlebell for swings on average, depending on the strength level of the athlete… what weights do you seen using kids on the DB-squat in this program on average? Can you throw some numbers around from weak to very strong for the circuits?

There is no average in HS. There is a wide discrepancy between freshman and seniors. Generally speaking, once the freshman get used to training, most of them can use the 100lbs for the DB Squat. We had 8th graders using the 80lbs. Juniors/Seniors never use anything less than 115lbs; if they use 115, the reps are much higher to make up for such a light weight.

#6

Thanks for the reply! What the fuck, strong dudes, very impressive!

I know your kids squat once per week n the offseason with the barbell and once per week with the DB.

-what set/rep scheme do they follow when they use such heavy DBs like 115s one day AND squat with the barbell on the other day to not overtrain or get sore?

-do they follow the set/rep scheme from the “beginner prep school” template or from the “Krypteia”?

-whats a good set/rep scheme for DBsquats on a seperate training day that makes sense in addition to squating with the regular barbell, FOR ATHLETES, not typical meatheads!?

I´m looking for a “reference point” for our soccer kids and I´m interested in your coaching thoughts.

Thanks!

#7
  1. We just shoot for 50-100 total reps; this is usually in sets of 10-15 reps. We have pushed the reps higher/set but it is somewhat pointless.

  2. We use a version of the Krypteia program.

  3. Just start with 5 sets of 10 reps; nothing too heavy, make sure they know how to do the movement, how to incorporate it into their training, the pace of the training, etc. You don’t just start at Level 10; you have to teach the lifts AND then teach them the pace and expectations.

We don’t get too sore for two very simple reasons:

  1. We train 51 weeks/year, 3 days/week.
  2. You know that whole, “switch movements in order to confuse the body/muscle” theory? It’s a big pile of horseshit when training athletes. Big,fat pile of stinky turds. Our entire off-season is based on our in-season; meaning, we train in such a way in the off-season that allows us to train hard in the in-season. There is no point in being strong in June and then be weak in October/November.

When you have 50 kids in the weight room (or more) - you have to be patient, introduce movements slowly and manage your expectations. But once things get implemented, good or bad, they steamroll. So make sure you get them started on the right foot.

Also, don’t worry about numbers; worry about the kids getting a little stronger every week/month. Don’t get carried away trying to get the kids to chase X bench or Y DB squat. It is a fool’s errand for a coach to let his own ego destroy a kid’s progress. From a % point of view, our kids train VERY LIGHT on the main lifts. Since we don’t max out and don’t routinely “go all out”, it’s a little hard to say exact how light but most of the kids can hit 15+ reps on their squat/deadlift on their heaviest week.

If you are consistent in the weight room you don’t have to train like an idiot. If your goal is to add weight as quickly as possible be ready for a shitstorm of bad form, soreness, undeveloped body parts and the inevitable frustration and shitty attitude that comes from hitting a wall. Take your goddamn time!

#8

Fuck!!! Thank you very much, thats so unbelievable valuable!!! You are a real trailblazor!