Beginner BJJ Tips

i am going to start bjj classes in a week anyone have any beginner advice?(other than shut up and check your ego at the door)thanks

Stay relaxed, don’t waste your energy.
Most beginners are likely to go berserk when they have their first sparring. Don’t do it, you will quicly lose your gas, as groundfighting is the most taxing form of combat. Remember, “fatigue makes coward of men”(F.Shamrock), so don’t panic, even if you end up in a very bad position.

When you’re rolling, you’re practicing so don’t be afraid of letting someone escape to see how he do it and don’t be afraid to put yourself in trouble to see how you manage out of such position. Rolling ain’t a tournament.

Listen to your body, you sometimes have sign of an upcoming injury, don’t force your body (I greatly regret not listening to my right knee).

Anyway, if you have a good instructor he will guide you well, just check your ego (as you said) and you’ll learn fast.

I remember someone here posted a list of different BJJ type guy, it was funny and true.

[quote]Maldoror wrote:
Stay relaxed, don’t waste your energy.
Most beginners are likely to go berserk when they have their first sparring. Don’t do it, you will quicly lose your gas, as groundfighting is the most taxing form of combat. Remember, “fatigue makes coward of men”(F.Shamrock), so don’t panic, even if you end up in a very bad position.[/quote]

Best advice. It takes time to relax, but that is usually a guy’s first breakthrough in grappling.

Yea stay relaxed and dont do that beginner thing where they’re like shaking, spazzing out and shit while they’re looking for something to grab.

just slow the fuck down, pretend you just smoked a bowl.

also use your peripheral vision… you should be able to do the shit blindfolded so don’t focus so much on your eyes.

relax and feeeellll get xen/zen with it lol.

Relaxing is a good tip. I’d also offer up this: don’t be afraid to ask questions. If you’re working on a specific submission or chaining several moves together and get lost, ask your partner and/or the instructor for help. It’s going to take a little while to get the nuances down, so you want to make sure what you are picking up is correct.

[quote]Maldoror wrote:
“fatigue makes coward of men”(F.Shamrock), so don’t panic, even if you end up in a very bad position.[/quote]

Pretty sure Franky stole that from Vince Lombardi.

i just started rolling a few months ago, and one tip my instructor gave me last practice that really helped was to imagine that your opponent is an immovable object and you have to move around them. it really helped me because it lets you use the movements that you learn in the class like shrimping and bridging. especially since i am one of the stronger students in the class in terms of weight training, so i have a tendency to push and bench press people who are on top of me, which is not the smartest because it leaves you open for arm locks etc.

Be prepared for the long haul if you want to get good.

Also, if you’ve never done any type of grappling, don’t do what I did. I had a couple years of strength training under my belt, showed up to BJJ the first day, and barely got out of bed the next morning. Huge bruises all over my arms from where the guy just pinned me down as I was trying to do a floor DB flye with my arms for about 5 minutes to escape. But yea, I probably had the worst BJJ first day ever as I thought I could just grit and fight my way through anything.

You’ll never forget the day you get choked out by a 125 lbs., 47 year old, vegetarian!

Take your time and communicate with whoever you’re practicing a move on. This will help you develop a feel for what you’re doing.

Leave your ego at the door and understand you will be tapping a lot. Instead of just fighting a sub til the death, see how your opponent got you in that position and how they finish it.

[quote]aleph wrote:
Maldoror wrote:
“fatigue makes coward of men”(F.Shamrock), so don’t panic, even if you end up in a very bad position.

Pretty sure Franky stole that from Vince Lombardi.[/quote]

yea apparently maldoror read this month’s “Grappling magazine”

I looked at that shit and wanted to slap the ink out of the pen of whoever quoted/wrote that shit.

frank shamrock my ass

Yeah, just get ready to get your ass handed to you by some little guy.

I just started this week. The first guy I rolled with was ALOT smaller, and while I was able to dominate and not get tapped, I had no idea what to do once I got past his guard or had a dominant position. I wasted all of my energy on throwing him around and I felt gassed after one 4 minute round…he had already done 6.

It really makes you feel humble. Especially when you watch the very advanced guys so effortlessly control bigger and stronger opponents.

p.s. I don’t think I’ll ever be able to talk to much shit to the television anymore when I see a guy tap.lol

Do not be afraid to lose. Also don’t give up on a technique just because it doesn’t work the first time you try it. I train Gracie Jiu-Jitsu (Helio’s group) and they advocate the standing guard pass. It is a difficult pass to learn without getting swept.

The first, oh I dunno, thousand times I tried it I got swept, but now I’m starting to get the balance down and can pass much better. You’ll run into a lot of techniques like that and they just take time, effort, and reps.

Also don’t try to get too fancy. Honestly, you’ll win 90% of your fights with just 3 or 4 techniques and they are usually basics. So train those basics and leave the rubber guard for when you’re more advanced.

  1. Position before submission.
  2. Don’t muscle into positions, use correct technique from day 1.
  3. Leave your pride by the door. Tapping out is important, letting yourself get into difficult positions is important. so… Leave the ego at the door.
  4. Practice the basics. Get a monster sidemount, a monster guard… and pass the guard like a god.

:wink:

Have fun!

Don’t neglect your game off your back, there’s always a better wrestler.

Don’t neglect your top game, most tourney’s give points for takedowns so you start out ahead if you wind up on top, and in a real fight, you don’t want to be on the bottom.

Get good at transitions, don’t fall into the habit of fighting super hard to say retain guard or side control or whatever, you’ll start to recognize what its like when there is no way you can retain it. This will help you conserve energy by not blowing your wad on a wasted effort, and keep you from getting put into even worse positions by continuing to fight for a lost cause and neglecting your defense. Its all give and take.

There isn’t anything wrong with going hard, it is a good way to build up cardio, but in the beginning you aren’t going to have much in your gas tank…I don’t care if you were a marathon runner, short of being a collegiate wrestler (maybe even highschool if you are still in shape,) you aren’t going to show up ready to roll hard for any length of time.

[quote]Xen Nova wrote:
aleph wrote:
Maldoror wrote:
“fatigue makes coward of men”(F.Shamrock), so don’t panic, even if you end up in a very bad position.

Pretty sure Franky stole that from Vince Lombardi.

yea apparently maldoror read this month’s “Grappling magazine”

I looked at that shit and wanted to slap the ink out of the pen of whoever quoted/wrote that shit.

frank shamrock my ass[/quote]

Anyway, whoever said it was right.

Wear elbow and knee pads.

Thank me later.

I almost forgot, wash your gi every day after practice, don’t be the asshole with the smelly gi…they suck to roll with.

frank shamrock my ass

Anyway, whoever said it was right.

Lombardi all the way. The original quote was “fatigue makes cowards of us all.”

Frank Shamrock, LOL!