T Nation

Becoming a PT As a Side Job?

I’ve heard it all about how personal training isn’t the career to go into to, but I’m an 18 year old college freshman and I’m wondering how feasible it would be to become a personal trainer within the next year. I’ve been into fitness and nutrition for the last 2 years and I’ve made considerable progress with myself, and I’m generally the “go-to guy” for my friends who are looking for advice.

I’m not looking for/expecting a lot of money, I don’t have any bills for the most part… but I would like to save up some money so I can travel a little in the summers. I am truly motivated by the desire to help and interact with other people and to be somewhat specialized in something other than fast food.

What would I be looking at to make this happen? Is a degree necessary? Knowledge really isn’t an issue, not that I know everything, but what I don’t know can be acquired rather easily.

Just be ready to be a sales person…

[quote]kevbo wrote:
I’ve heard it all about how personal training isn’t the career to go into to, but I’m an 18 year old college freshman and I’m wondering how feasible it would be to become a personal trainer within the next year. I’ve been into fitness and nutrition for the last 2 years and I’ve made considerable progress with myself, and I’m generally the “go-to guy” for my friends who are looking for advice.

I’m not looking for/expecting a lot of money, I don’t have any bills for the most part… but I would like to save up some money so I can travel a little in the summers. I am truly motivated by the desire to help and interact with other people and to be somewhat specialized in something other than fast food.

What would I be looking at to make this happen? Is a degree necessary? Knowledge really isn’t an issue, not that I know everything, but what I don’t know can be acquired rather easily.[/quote]

When I was 18 and begining college I was in your exact same position. I was begining school to be a pharmacist and wanted to try the training thing during college because of my passion for health and fitness. I got my certification throught the NSCA which took my about 4 months of studying.

I had a lot of prior knowledge as well. I reccommend checking them out (www.nsca-cc.org) or the ACSM certification. Top two out their in my opinion. I started training with just 1 client at a small studio. In the last 3 years the studio has grown so much we moved locations and I train 18 clients weekly totaling 35-45 hours of work a week. I changed my major to Kinesiology and I love my job. Once I finish school I am going to continue training clients and hopefully open into other aspects of the industry. Don’t let anyone tell you that you cant do something. If you want it bad enough you can make it work. Good Luck!

[quote]-ck wrote:

I was begining school to be a pharmacist

[/quote]

I can’t believe you gave up pharmacy degree for kinesology. Was it really worth it?

[quote]-ck wrote:

When I was 18 and begining college I was in your exact same position. I was begining school to be a pharmacist and wanted to try the training thing during college because of my passion for health and fitness. I got my certification throught the NSCA which took my about 4 months of studying.

I had a lot of prior knowledge as well. I reccommend checking them out (www.nsca-cc.org) or the ACSM certification. Top two out their in my opinion. I started training with just 1 client at a small studio. In the last 3 years the studio has grown so much we moved locations and I train 18 clients weekly totaling 35-45 hours of work a week. I changed my major to Kinesiology and I love my job. Once I finish school I am going to continue training clients and hopefully open into other aspects of the industry. Don’t let anyone tell you that you cant do something. If you want it bad enough you can make it work. Good Luck!
[/quote]

Thats cool to hear. Thanks. I just signed up for a W.I.T.S. course. I know that it probable doesnt offer much info, but I have been into working out and nutrition for a while, and its just a start. Eventually I want to take up more classes on the subject or my dream would be to open my own gym. Which might be a pretty big possibility soon

[quote]HJLau75 wrote:
-ck wrote:

I was begining school to be a pharmacist

I can’t believe you gave up pharmacy degree for kinesology. Was it really worth it?[/quote]

Yes it definitely was. I love every minute of what I do. I wouldn’t trade it to be a Doctor, lawyer, or anything else. It may sound crazy to some but I am very passionate about it and can make a very good living at it. I do have the advantage of working in a studio. I eventually plan on opening my own studio and hopefully doing some writing and exploring other aspects of the industry.

[quote]-ck wrote:
kevbo wrote:
I’ve heard it all about how personal training isn’t the career to go into to, but I’m an 18 year old college freshman and I’m wondering how feasible it would be to become a personal trainer within the next year. I’ve been into fitness and nutrition for the last 2 years and I’ve made considerable progress with myself, and I’m generally the “go-to guy” for my friends who are looking for advice.

I’m not looking for/expecting a lot of money, I don’t have any bills for the most part… but I would like to save up some money so I can travel a little in the summers. I am truly motivated by the desire to help and interact with other people and to be somewhat specialized in something other than fast food.

What would I be looking at to make this happen? Is a degree necessary? Knowledge really isn’t an issue, not that I know everything, but what I don’t know can be acquired rather easily.

When I was 18 and begining college I was in your exact same position. I was begining school to be a pharmacist and wanted to try the training thing during college because of my passion for health and fitness. I got my certification throught the NSCA which took my about 4 months of studying.

I had a lot of prior knowledge as well. I reccommend checking them out (www.nsca-cc.org) or the ACSM certification. Top two out their in my opinion. I started training with just 1 client at a small studio. In the last 3 years the studio has grown so much we moved locations and I train 18 clients weekly totaling 35-45 hours of work a week. I changed my major to Kinesiology and I love my job. Once I finish school I am going to continue training clients and hopefully open into other aspects of the industry. Don’t let anyone tell you that you cant do something. If you want it bad enough you can make it work. Good Luck!
[/quote]

Very helpful reply, thank you very much! I will definitely look into all of the things you mentioned.

Thanks again

[quote]HJLau75 wrote:
-ck wrote:

I was begining school to be a pharmacist

I can’t believe you gave up pharmacy degree for kinesology. Was it really worth it?[/quote]

I worked in a pharmacy for five years…

I’d rather haul trash.

[quote]HJLau75 wrote:

I can’t believe you gave up pharmacy degree for kinesology. Was it really worth it?[/quote]

Kinesiology is my major and I know lots of people who switch to kinesiology. I know people who quit their engineering job to go back to school and get a degree in it. It seems like it is where a lot of people end up because it is such an awesome major.