T Nation

Beastly Q&A - Monday 7 to 8

Guys, I’m here from 7 to 8 … if you have any questions, first come first served!

What would your reccommend to someone who needs to condition their lower back to handle heavy loads in training. I know westside calls this bullet-proofing. I just feel i can’t push it really hard because my lower back isn’t conditioned enough to handle it. So what would you recommended?

Hey CT -

Is that you in the Powerful Images photo?

CT,

I have a question about the posing methods you discussed about being able to create muscle density. You said on D-Tap that you prefer posing be done right after lifting or even in between lifts and each session should last about 20-30 minutes.

How much greater of an impact is the posing done right after weight lifting opposed to posing after an energy systems work session (weight lifting sessions and energy systems sessions on different days)?

The reason I ask is due to time constraints, my lifting sessions are longer than I spend on energy system sessions and I don’t want to pack the posing session with lifting unless it’s absolutely essential to do so.

Thanks!

CT,

How often should one do isometrics for hypertrophy? Every day? 5-7 days a week? Only on lifting days? Thanks for your time.

BD

two questions:

  1. could you check out the program I wrote for olympic lifting?

  2. How could I work around a shoulder impingement in the bench press? there is a meet coming up on july 30, I have my shoulder almost all rehabed and want to start to hitting my lockout. Some things to note: this will be my first bench competition and my first time in a shirt. I’m 5’11+(slightly taller) and weigh 205. Any other tips/insights you could help me with for this? shirt preferences?

Would you recomend cycling rack pulls/deficit deads to help increase deadlift strength?

Also what other exercises/ideas do you have to build up the deadlift?

Hey Coach,

For athletes that need to drop bodyfat, do you use 3-week accumulation/intensification blocks, and if so, what volume and intensity modifications do you make?

Can a short-term volume overreaching and subsequent retaining/supercompensation approach be effective with an athlete who is in a calorie deficit the entire time?

Any other thoughts on training overfat ahtletes?

Thanks very much,
Zak

[quote]binford wrote:
What would your reccommend to someone who needs to condition their lower back to handle heavy loads in training. I know westside calls this bullet-proofing. I just feel i can’t push it really hard because my lower back isn’t conditioned enough to handle it. So what would you recommended?[/quote]

Train your lower back and your abs 3-4 times per week. For your lower back you can start lighter with more volume and gradually work up to more heavy stuff when you feel ready for it.

Back extensions (weighted if possible) with a 3-5 sec. isometric hold.

Romanian deadlifts

45 degrees (weighted if possible) with a 3-5 sec. isometric hold.

Pull through

Seated goodmorning

Arched back goodmorning

Reverse hyper

Pick one per session and perform 3-6 sets of 8-15 reps.

[quote]basementD wrote:
CT,

How often should one do isometrics for hypertrophy? Every day? 5-7 days a week? Only on lifting days? Thanks for your time.

BD[/quote]

I do them only on lifting days as an accessory movement or technique for the muscle or lift I’m working in that session.

[quote]JNeves wrote:
Would you recomend cycling rack pulls/deficit deads to help increase deadlift strength?

Also what other exercises/ideas do you have to build up the deadlift?[/quote]

A good friend of mine and former member of the Canadian olympic lifting team is training several powerlifters for a national competition. His guys always kick ass on the deadlift.

This year he tried to switch to performing mostly rack pulls, with little floor deadlifts (based on the theory that squatting and deadlifting involve the same muscle groups) and all the guys saw their deadlift decrease severely (I’m talking about guys doing 700lbs suddenly having problems with 585).

He got back to including more lifts from the floor and the deads went up again.

Rack pulls are very good to build lower back strength, improve deadlifting lockout, getting used to handling big weights. But they neglect the technical aspect of lifting. So I recommend always doing one movement from the floor whenever your perform partial lifts.

I also like to include deadlifts standing on a platform.

Coach Thibaudeau,

When you have a deadlift type (tall, short torso) who needs to increase his squatting power, do you train him the same way as you would a squatting type, or do you use different methods?

I ask because I am fairly tall and have a fairly short torso, and I power clean about as much as I squat clean right now - a real leg power deficit. Dan John mentioned that front squats seem to be a better way for guys who don’t have a Weightlifter’s build to push up their squat clean. Do you agree with his opinion?

Sorry that I hijacked your PL thread with this question earlier. Eric Cressey and Mike Robertson mentioned that they might be coming out with an article about this, but I’m very interested in your opinion on this matter as well.

[quote]Ramo wrote:
Hey Coach,

For athletes that need to drop bodyfat, do you use 3-week accumulation/intensification blocks, and if so, what volume and intensity modifications do you make?

Can a short-term volume overreaching and subsequent retaining/supercompensation approach be effective with an athlete who is in a calorie deficit the entire time?

Any other thoughts on training overfat ahtletes?

Thanks very much,
Zak [/quote]

I do use a similar training approach, but reduce the training volume slightly as well as the rest intervals.

I don’t like to use an overreaching/recovery technique with overweight athletes because an overreaching protocole performed while in a caloric deficit can easily lead to severe overtraining while a recovery/surcompensation phase while on a caloric deficit wont lead to as much restoration because you are not giving the body enough nutrients and calories to surcompensate.

[quote]fedaykin wrote:
two questions:

  1. could you check out the program I wrote for olympic lifting?

  2. How could I work around a shoulder impingement in the bench press? there is a meet coming up on july 30, I have my shoulder almost all rehabed and want to start to hitting my lockout. Some things to note: this will be my first bench competition and my first time in a shirt. I’m 5’11+(slightly taller) and weigh 205. Any other tips/insights you could help me with for this? shirt preferences?[/quote]

I’ll check out the olympic lifting program and will get back to you. However you should contact Dr.Ryan for your injury question.

[quote]rainjack wrote:
Hey CT -

Is that you in the Powerful Images photo?[/quote]

No that’s Skip Lacour; arguably the best natural bodybuilder in the world. Thanks for the great compliment though!

Christian,
for a knee tracking problem what kind of stuff do you like? symtoms are: no swelling, minor atrophy of the VMO & glute medius, and if i do an iso hold with my leg between 90 degrees and fully standing i have a little pain… any suggestions? i was thinking maybe isos?

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:
fedaykin wrote:
two questions:

  1. could you check out the program I wrote for olympic lifting?

  2. How could I work around a shoulder impingement in the bench press? there is a meet coming up on july 30, I have my shoulder almost all rehabed and want to start to hitting my lockout. Some things to note: this will be my first bench competition and my first time in a shirt. I’m 5’11+(slightly taller) and weigh 205. Any other tips/insights you could help me with for this? shirt preferences?

I’ll check out the olympic lifting program and will get back to you. However you should contact Dr.Ryan for your injury question.[/quote]

Thank you for your insight. It’s greatly appreciated to have someone of your caliber doing things like this!!

[quote]strongersafety wrote:
Christian,
for a knee tracking problem what kind of stuff do you like? symtoms are: no swelling, minor atrophy of the VMO & glute medius, and if i do an iso hold with my leg between 90 degrees and fully standing i have a little pain… any suggestions? i was thinking maybe isos?[/quote]

Isometric work at a knee angle of 135 degrees; bulgarian squats with a top double contraction (1 1/2 reps … perform one full rep followed by a half rep … this would equal one repetition); Peterson step-ups; half front squats; split squats

[quote]Ross Hunt wrote:
Coach Thibaudeau,

When you have a deadlift type (tall, short torso) who needs to increase his squatting power, do you train him the same way as you would a squatting type, or do you use different methods?

I ask because I am fairly tall and have a fairly short torso, and I power clean about as much as I squat clean right now - a real leg power deficit. Dan John mentioned that front squats seem to be a better way for guys who don’t have a Weightlifter’s build to push up their squat clean. Do you agree with his opinion?

Sorry that I hijacked your PL thread with this question earlier. Eric Cressey and Mike Robertson mentioned that they might be coming out with an article about this, but I’m very interested in your opinion on this matter as well.[/quote]

When you are built for a certain lift you need much less assistance work than if you are not built for the lift.

For example, I’m built to squat (short legs, long torso, thick waist) and my squat goes up just as much if I only do squats than if I use a lot of assistance work.

However to get my deadlift to budge I need to really work hard on assistance work.

My friend Patrick Lemieux (a powerlifter I train with; we are also working on a book together) is the perfect example of a deadlift built. His deadlift goes up only by thinking of deadlifting!!! However it has taken his a lot of work to move his squat up. Last week he did 650, which is good considering that a year ago he was stuck at 550. He does tons of assistance work for his squat.

Basically when you are not built to squat you must take the time to individually strengthen all the muscles involved in the squat. So you have to include plenty of hamstring, glutes, lower back and quadriceps work.

Front squats are good if your back squat style is a close-stance/high bar squat (i.e. olympic lifting squat). However they wont do you much good if you prefer a wider stance/lower back style (i.e. powerlifting squat).

For guys with your built tons on glutes and hamstring work is usually the best strategy.

CT flat out give me your dream back workout, training for hypertrophy/strength and that dorian yates sized back