Beans = Soy Protein?

I’m eating a lot of beans (garbanzo, pinto, etc). Is the protein type in these type of beans the same as in soybeans? I don’t believe this is the case but I want to make sure.

Protein is protein for the most part.

The only problem with beans is that they are not a ‘complete’ protein, so the need to be eaten with a complementary protein if you want to build muscle.

Not sure if you were implying isoflavone content, but here it is in case you wanted to know.

EDIT: perhaps you were wondering about complete amino acid intake, in which case it would be helpful to know that all beans (that I’m aware of) lack methionine, which is found in grains (if you’re staying vegetarian).

[quote]HK24719 wrote:
Protein is protein for the most part.

The only problem with beans is that they are not a ‘complete’ protein, so the need to be eaten with a complementary protein if you want to build muscle.[/quote]

True dat homey! Solid info. To add to that I will say that you can get the complimentary proteins that you need to build muscle from grains such as oats and wheat… Thus beans & rice, PB&J etc… Cheese and other dairy also helps out the protein equation if you’re limiting your meat intake.

My guess is that the OP is concerned with the qualities of soy that have caused hysteria recently, namely phytoestrogens. I do not believe that those other beans mentioned are as rich in the estrogen-like compounds as soy.

[quote]Schwarzenegger wrote:
Isoflavones content - Isoflavones [/quote]

Good link. Why does it say flax has none? I thought flax was possibly deleterious to men’s health because of these compounds. Did they just not cover all of the phytoestrogens?

[quote]beebuddy wrote:
Schwarzenegger wrote:

Good link. Why does it say flax has none? I thought flax was possibly deleterious to men’s health because of these compounds. Did they just not cover all of the phytoestrogens? [/quote]

I assume so. I thought the same thing when I looked. However, there are phytoestrogens that aren’t isoflavones.

I should have clarified my original question.

I eat beans (chickpeas, pinto, black) normally at lunch with a low fat protein (chicken, beef,turkey). So I care less about the amount of protein in the beans, and really care for the high fiber aspect of the beans.

What I’m worried about is the so called “estrogenic” effects of the soy. I’m wondering if I’m eating too much, when I have a can of chickpeas, for lunch 3 or 4 times a week. It’s the soy content.

So my question is the soy content in these beans. Is there any, and does it have the negative impact?

[quote]ghost87 wrote:
So my question is the soy content in these beans. Is there any, and does it have the negative impact? [/quote]

Why don’t you just read the label or check with the company that packaged them?

I normally wouldn’t expect “beans” to contain soy, so I don’t get why you’re asking.

black or garbanzo beans don’t ‘contain’ soybeans. that’s like asking if chicken contains pork. they are different things. soy refers to an actual, specific kind of plant. there are, however, soy based ingredients in a lot of foods so it’s good to check labels.

[quote]Schwarzenegger wrote:

Not sure if you were implying isoflavone content, but here it is in case you wanted to know.

EDIT: perhaps you were wondering about complete amino acid intake, in which case it would be helpful to know that all beans (that I’m aware of) lack methionine, which is found in grains (if you’re staying vegetarian).[/quote]

beans and rice

Phytoestrogen content of some foods:

Quick answer to your question: you don’t have to worry about estrogenic effects from the beans you are eating.

Long answer: beans aren’t on this list, but some are included in the first list I posted. I suggest reading the Wikipedia articles on “phytoestrogens” and “isoflavones,” and then reading additional sources if you still haven’t found an answer to your question. Of course you should quickly browse the two lists I posted here to get an idea of the content of these in popular foods.

EDIT: as far as how much phytoestrogen content is too much, when is comes to negative (or even positive) side effects, well nobody can answer that. Check out PubMed or something similar and do some searching around. You’ll find everything from “no significant estrogenic side effects (positive or negative) with large intakes” to “small intakes are bad” to “it doesn’t matter unless you’re a developing fetus.” Point is, nobody knows and it probably doesn’t matter unless you’re having specific problems with it. I eat soy flour and flaxseed every day in large quantities (along with many others “manly” things) and I certainly don’t have a problem with size, leanness, sexual drive, etc. Some people are different though.