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BCAA Protocol

I have come up with my own BCAA protocol. I wanted to keep it to 5 servings of 5 g (25g) daily.

On Workout Days: Upon Waking, Pre-Workout, Post-Workout, Before Bed, Mid Sleep.

On Non- Workout Days: Upon Waking, Mid Morning, Mid Afternoon, Before Bed, Mid Sleep.

I am in a clean bulk and am consuming 5000-6000 calories daily, with of course 2g protien per Ib. The before bed and mid sleep will be in addition to a Metabolic Drive shake (with peanut butter for delayed absorbtion).

Does anyone have any suggestions for me to change the way I am supplementing with BCAAs?

[quote]tajam wrote:
I have come up with my own BCAA protocol. I wanted to keep it to 5 servings of 5 g (25g) daily.

On Workout Days: Upon Waking, Pre-Workout, Post-Workout, Before Bed, Mid Sleep.

On Non- Workout Days: Upon Waking, Mid Morning, Mid Afternoon, Before Bed, Mid Sleep.

I am in a clean bulk and am consuming 5000-6000 calories daily, with of course 2g protien per Ib. The before bed and mid sleep will be in addition to a Metabolic Drive shake (with peanut butter for delayed absorbtion).

Does anyone have any suggestions for me to change the way I am supplementing with BCAAs?
[/quote]

Since PB is known to trigger a high insulin response, you might want to be careful about using it too frequently.

As for BCAAs, I’ve gotten a better response from using higher dosages less frequently than what you’ve proposed. I’m currently using 10 Biotest BCAA tablets upon rising and immediately following training. I consume Surge after I get out of the shower.

However, as opposed to your goals, I’m working on increasing my strength-to-weight ratio by lowering body fat. As a result, you may be better served by having Surge immediately after training.

[quote]ChrisKing wrote:
Since PB is known to trigger a high insulin response, you might want to be careful about using it too frequently.
[/quote]

PB doesn’t trigger a high insulin response, it doesn’t even contain any carbs. The protein might elicit a little release but the fat will lower the absorption rate (and at the same time the GI).

[quote]andrew_plamondon wrote:
ChrisKing wrote:
Since PB is known to trigger a high insulin response, you might want to be careful about using it too frequently.

PB doesn’t trigger a high insulin response, it doesn’t even contain any carbs. The protein might elicit a little release but the fat will lower the absorption rate (and at the same time the GI).[/quote]

It doesn’t have to have carbs to trigger an insulin response. And since when does fat lower GI? Does frying food in oil lower it’s GI? If it does, why is everyone who eats at KFC so fat?

To the OP- try natural peanut butter instead of good ol’ regular jiffy. Best of both worlds…

The protein will not create an insulin response. It also will not decrease absorbtion. The fat in it will cause a slowing of digesting the protein which is what the OP wants at night.

Some folks need to look into the insulin response to amino acids. There is one.

It depends on the speed of release of certain aminos and/or carbohydrates into the bloodstream.

Certain mixtures of amino acids and carbohydrates elicit a larger insulin response than the carbohydrates alone.

It gets fairly complicated as many factors can have an impact on gastric emptying and absorption rates.

In general, whole food protein sources will not have a response anything like a refined carbohydrate food source.