T Nation

BB Single Leg Squats

Hi folks
I have just started doing single leg squats with a barbel and my spare leg on a bench behind me. I have started doing these because we dont have any sort of squat rack and it was starting to get silly taking the weight over my head after doing 5x5. So i decided that i could cut the weight in half that i put over my head and onto my shoulders by changing to single leg squats.

The issue is that on a normal squat i could go pretty low, not quite atg but quite close - Now while doing single leg squats, with my right leg i can go right down but my left leg is rubbish and is no where near.

How can i even them up? Should i do me left leg with a lower weight or will it just take some time to come up to par with my right leg?

Thanks in advance
Ken

Do pistols instead of bulgarian split squats.

walking lunges work well too

How deep can you go with each leg with very light weights? It’s not a balance/flexibility issue is it?

[quote]kennyken wrote:
I have started doing these because we dont have any sort of squat rack and it was starting to get silly taking the weight over my head after doing 5x5.[/quote]

Side note - Learn to power clean, so you can front squat and/or lunge with the bar in the rack position. Those are solid exercises for the squat rack-less.

Mike Boyle, the Boston back squat basher, strikes again! Dun-dun-dunnnnnnnnnnnnnn.

(Just kidding. Boyle’s the man.)

Like Rhino said, how many with each leg can you do with zero weight?

That should be step one before you use any weight on pretty much any exercise. If you can’t do it with zero, then you certainly can’t do it with 45, 95, or 155 on your back.

Generally, to address bilateral discrepancies (when one arm/leg is much stronger than the other), I suggest doing whatever sets and reps fit your program, but cater the weight you use to the weaker side.

So, in this case (assuming you’re able to do plenty with no resistance), do the 5x5 or whatever for both legs, but train each leg with whatever weight that the left can handle. Your right will essentially be put on “maintenance” while the left is really challenged.

Messing around with “this leg uses this weight/sets/reps but this other leg uses this weight/sets/reps” is too difficult to track and predict with any real degree of accuracy. How much is too much? How light is light enough? Avoid the whole situation by catering to the weaker side… which will turn it into the not-weaker side much sooner.

[quote]TheDudeAbides wrote:
walking lunges work well too[/quote]

This was going to be my suggestion as well.