T Nation

basic nutrition - is this right?

Highly processed, high-glycemic foods are bad because they cause an insulin spike which ceases the burning of fat and the production of growth hormones. (Testosterone, too?)

Natural sugars, such as in fruit, are fine and can be consumed in any quantity at any time with no unwanted reactions from the body. Fruit may be preferable to fruit juice, as there is fibre in fruit which is removed from the juice: natural sugars without their fibre leads to insulin spikes.

High glycemic meals can be countered. By consuming high quantities of fibre and (good) fats in the same meal has the high-glycemic food the overall digestive process can be slowed and the sugary foods will not shoot through your system, causing an insulin spike.

Sugar is acceptable in the mornings and after a workout, when your body will likely to be depleted. It should be avoided before bedtime because that’s when your body will do the bulk of its growing. Sugar can be sipped with a quick protein product during a workout to increase the workout’s longevity and to accelerate the recovery process.

Casein whey and cottage cheese are excellent proteins to consume before bedtime because they are slow-digesting and will carry you throughout the night.

For optimum muscle growth, the body must constantly be in an anabolic state. To do this you must exercise every 48 hours (?) and eat protein every three hours. Rest is also very important; get a minimum of eight hours a night.

I’m trying to make sense of the mess of information that’s floating around on the subject of diet and nutrition. Fill in the blanks and make corrections as is needed.

[quote]Takinguptheroom wrote:
Highly processed, high-glycemic foods are bad because they cause an insulin spike which ceases the burning of fat and the production of growth hormones. (Testosterone, too?) [/quote]

Pretty much, but there are exceptions to this, such as post workout, which you touch on later in your post…

[quote]

Natural sugars, such as in fruit, are fine and can be consumed in any quantity at any time with no unwanted reactions from the body. Fruit may be preferable to fruit juice, as there is fibre in fruit which is removed from the juice: natural sugars without their fibre leads to insulin spikes. [/quote]

Not so fast there. Words like “any” are dangerous. Eat 10lbs of oranges…you’ll gain weight. Still gotta remember calories. Just take into account everything you eat.

Again, pretty much, although if you’re eating by the Berardi guidelines you’d attempt to minimize the fat added to the meals, and focus on fiber, not combining high fat and high carb meals.

[quote]

Sugar is acceptable in the mornings and after a workout, when your body will likely to be depleted. It should be avoided before bedtime because that’s when your body will do the bulk of its growing. [/quote] If you work out close to bedtime, go ahead and have your sugar and other high glycemic carbs and your protein [quote]Sugar can be sipped with a quick protein product during a workout to increase the workout’s longevity and to accelerate the recovery process. [/quote]Mmhmmm.[quote]

Casein whey and cottage cheese are excellent proteins to consume before bedtime because they are slow-digesting and will carry you throughout the night. [/quote] Whey is a fast protein, casein is the slow. Milk proteins and whole food proteins are slower as well. [quote]

For optimum muscle growth, the body must constantly be in an anabolic state. To do this you must exercise every 48 hours (?) and eat protein every three hours. Rest is also very important; get a minimum of eight hours a night. [/quote] A lot of blanket statements in that one. Words like “every” and “must” aren’t very appropriate. Many programs have you training much more often than every 48 hours. The parameters just have to be adjusted so has to not impeded recovery. Also, most people cannot get a minimum of 8 hours of sleep a not. Or many people cannot rather. Sleep as much as you can while still being able to be productive and nap if possible. Eat meals often but make sure you have your calories under control. Whether eating Massive Eating style or not, overshoot too much you’ll gain fat or undershoot too much and you’ll hinder or stop muscle gains and perhaps lose muscle.

Pretty good overall understanding!