T Nation

Baseball Practice, How to Train?


#1

My baseball practices start now mon-thurs. 330 to 530. Should i continue to weight train with my renegade style program or leave it to rest?


#2

just stick to baseball training its more important then lifting at this stage, leave lifting for the offseason just stick with what you built up. Being a skilled baseball player infinitely better then strong baseball player.


#3

I disagree. Get fast, explosive, strong. Focus on the main lifts like with everyone else. Keep volume low during the season. What level baseball are you playing?


#4

highschool


#5

In season I don't know of many baseball players who are also lifting. Its really not necessary you will be doing lots of running and demanding practices, adding weightlifting will slow you down during practice. Your not going to make any gains in season and if you are its going to hurt you in games. Your young you will keep all your strength gains just doing your practices.


#6

I played alot of baseball in my youth. I used to train pretty hard during the season. This was about 20 years ago when ball players weren't supposed to lift weights. Between baseball and lifting, I got nasty tendonitis in both elbows (Mostly because I didnt know what I was doing training wise). Be smart if you do train during the season, it can take its toll. Go easy on the elbows and shoulders. But, boy, could I hit the ball a tonne.

One thing I experienced that I never heard anybody mention before was that I found out that getting stronger messed with my swing a little. Usually I could get the kinks out in BP but not always. This still happens to me when I playing old fat guy softball.


#7

just lift to maintain. If it means anything to you, when many of the guys on the football team (i know you're on baseball) disregard training in season, there lifts dramatcially decrease by the end of the 2 months.


#8

I noticed this too but they QUICKLY regained what their strength was previously-I can only speak for lineman since thats position I played in HS, probably since we did shit load of sled drills-


#9

I'm assuming your actual season doesn't begin until the spring..if that's the case, I would keep training when you can fit it into your schedule. Keep the volume low and listen to your body. If you feel it affects your baseball abilities, tone it down a notch.

If your season is already starting, be smart about it. If you feel you can handle low volume a couple times a week, then do it. If not, don't do it. It's as simple as that. Make sure you eat enough though.


#10

Yeah definitely gotta listen to your body. But I don't see the point in regressing, even if you can regain your strength really quickly after the season. Keep on keepin' on is what I say.

Something else to consider is how much playing time you're getting, are you a starter? If not, I'd put a lot of my energy into getting stronger/faster for next year while working on skill development the whole time, too. They're not exclusive as far as I'm concerned.

Train smart and play hard, listen to your body.


#11

I know it's a bit late for a post, but I figured I might as well throw this out there for future reference.

There are some pretty good responses here. It is very important to listen to your body. But to do that, you must first learn how to do that. I played baseball through high school, college and at the pro level and have tried everything from lifting heavy, to not lifting at all. In the end (around junior year of college) I found that cutting back from 4-6 days of training to 2-3 days of shorter, but still high intensity sessions worked best.

But I am not you. What you should do is try out different methods while staying safe and paying as close attention to your body as possible.

Just remember, the farther you go with baseball, the more you play. And, while it's a very low-key, slow moving game, it will wear you down big time if your not careful.