T Nation

Barbell vs Trap Bar Deadlifts

Is the trap bar deadlift essentially a mix between squats and regular deadlifts? The trap bar takes the stress off the spine, it seems, but isn’t the point of deadlifts to target the lower back?

On the other hand, if the trap bar deadlift allows you to lift the most wait, I can see why it would be beneficial.

How do most people incorporate the trap bar into your deadlifting routine?

The point of deadlifts isn’t to target the lower back, it’s to deadlift.

I never really got any benefit from trap bar lifts into my deadlift. I like using it for non-powerlifting trainees, just because it’s an easier lift to learn.

I use the trap bar alot when I’m training, a joe public for general fitness, thier easier to teach than squat or deads, people seem to like them, as for lifter’s we can cycle trap bar in with other two lifts, but I’ve found it has little carry over strenght, to either lift. Where I think the trap bar excels is for high rep work, for me anything over 3 reps on deads is an invataion for injury, and with squats you have to keep weight on your back while you catch your breath(good,and bad) the trap bar is perfect for 15-50rep work,at the end of say a squat or dead workout, step into the trapbar with a medium weight,and pick a number say 50,don’t leave the bar till your done, we get little comp. going(300x30)is a good one.I didn’t really give you a solid answer to your question, but this is mainly how we use the trap bar, gooluck

I know Konstantin Konstantinovs loves the trap bar for deadlifts, especially when he does them from a deficit, if that means anything. Maybe they work well just for him, or maybe he’s on to something, being one of the best raw deadlifters in the world.

I suppose a benefit of them would be allowing for higher frequency pulling since they seem to be a lot less taxing than conventional pulls.

[quote]OmniStyx wrote:
I know Konstantin Konstantinovs loves the trap bar for deadlifts, especially when he does them from a deficit, if that means anything. Maybe they work well just for him, or maybe he’s on to something, being one of the best raw deadlifters in the world.

I suppose a benefit of them would be allowing for higher frequency pulling since they seem to be a lot less taxing than conventional pulls.[/quote]

To be fair, he uses that movement in addition to many other deadlift variations. He does a lot of deads.

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:

[quote]OmniStyx wrote:
I know Konstantin Konstantinovs loves the trap bar for deadlifts, especially when he does them from a deficit, if that means anything. Maybe they work well just for him, or maybe he’s on to something, being one of the best raw deadlifters in the world.

I suppose a benefit of them would be allowing for higher frequency pulling since they seem to be a lot less taxing than conventional pulls.[/quote]

To be fair, he uses that movement in addition to many other deadlift variations. He does a lot of deads.[/quote]
Oh, yes, of course. I didn’t mean he uses it exclusively, rather he probably wouldn’t be able to pull as frequently as he does without utilizing trap bar pulls in conjunction with conventional.

A lot of how effective the carry over will be depends on how the person doing the lift sets up for it. Some people will have almost no bend at the hip, making it more like a reverse squat. Others will have quite a bit of bend at the hip and much less knee bend, making it more like a deadlift. Pretty versatile tool, but not one I’ve had the chance to try personally.

[quote]pre04 wrote:
Is the trap bar deadlift essentially a mix between squats and regular deadlifts? The trap bar takes the stress off the spine, it seems, but isn’t the point of deadlifts to target the lower back?

On the other hand, if the trap bar deadlift allows you to lift the most wait, I can see why it would be beneficial.

How do most people incorporate the trap bar into your deadlifting routine? [/quote]

If you want to see what it does for you, grab some dumbells and do deads with them as if it were a trap bar. While not the same, it would give you an idea of what it’s like enough to possibly help you decide if you want to drop $100 and something on one.

I’ve used one on numerous occasions and though it was akin to an ez curl bar for deadlifts. I didn’t really see much benefit from it to help improve my deadlift and it certainly won’t help my squat. Barring some sort of physical ailment that prevents you from doing squats and deads I wouldn’t put too much stock in that bar, that is unless you just wanted one for variety. In which case I’d go with a set of farmers walk handles. There’s just something cool about picking up a couple hundred pounds in each hand and walking down the street with it.