T Nation

Bar Sliding Down Back on Squats


#1

When I go heavy, like a 5RM, the bar usually slides about 2-3 inches down my back after the 3rd rep. Should I start putting chalk on my shoulders or something??


#2

Is it rolling or slipping?

I’d think chalk would only help if its slipping.


#3

grip might be too wide. not tight enough across the back to keep the bar in place. if rolling youre not gripping the hard enough. if slipping not pulling the back down/into the back.


#4

Your grip might be too wide. Pull your hands close and use a narrower grip.


#5

where does the bar rest? on your traps or lower?, i try to always set the bar as high as posible, and always grip the bar as narrow as i can, so i can have control of the bar the whole time.


#6

I put chalk across my shoulders every time I squat


#7

You’re not getting tight enough. Pull your hands in and get tighter.


#8

Thank you all for the helpful replies.

The bar slides down, not rolls. It makes my wrists hurt pretty bad when it does it too but I always finish my set.

I like it right below my traps, about a bar’s thickness below my shoulders like some PL rules say is the lowest you can go. I have a longish torso so a lower position really helps.

My grip is… the ring between the knurling is between my index and ring finger.


#9

Build up your upper back up, it will give you more area to “grip” the bar with.


#10

I know some people equate it with using a pad but I find the manta ray to be very useful. It allows you to concentrate on squatting rather than worrying about the bar position on your back.


#11

i would squat with the bar slightly higher. also check the grip and see how “balanced” the bar feels when it is on your back


#12

tighten that grip boy and look up!


#13

[quote]banco wrote:
I know some people equate it with using a pad but I find the manta ray to be very useful. It allows you to concentrate on squatting rather than worrying about the bar position on your back. [/quote]

Bad advice. Using the manta ray isn’t addressing the problem, it’s just hiding it for the time being.

OP, build the back up, keep it tight, and move your hands in. It’s just one of those things that falls together with experience. You might need to adjust where you have the bar as well, fix these things before they become ingrained.

The bar position will feel natural after a while, and youll be able to hold it there until your arms go numb.


#14

grow bigger traps/rhomboids? gives the bar something to rest on


#15

[quote]banco wrote:
I know some people equate it with using a pad but I find the manta ray to be very useful. It allows you to concentrate on squatting rather than worrying about the bar position on your back. [/quote]

God you people really make the bar sitting on your back a big deal? You have to worry about it? Really? -_-


#16

As others have said, tighten your back up my moving in your hands and really forcing your shoulder blades together. Also, build up your rear delts/upper back to form a better shelf. Chalk is good too.


#17

[quote]Liv92 wrote:
banco wrote:
I know some people equate it with using a pad but I find the manta ray to be very useful. It allows you to concentrate on squatting rather than worrying about the bar position on your back.

God you people really make the bar sitting on your back a big deal? You have to worry about it? Really? -_-[/quote]

AC at my gym blows, and I’m pretty sweaty by the time I get to 3 plates, so yeah were the bar sits is a big deal to me.

Plus the lower it is, the better I squat.

So yeah, to me, and obviously the OP it is a big deal.


#18

front squats


#19

[quote]dratner wrote:
front squats[/quote]

Wow thats really helpful pal.

OP: Hey, I need help with my backsquats
douchenozzle: just front squat instead!

So tell us, oh great one, how would ‘front squats’ help with his bar rolling down his back?

Doing front squats has never improved the positioning of the bar on back squats for me.


#20

tranquilo!!!

i think he was just kidding