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Baked Protein Brownies Denatured?

I made a great recipe for protein brownies.

I have one concern though. I cook the Whey protein(Isolate & Concentrate) in the recipe on 350F for 15-20 minutes.

Will this destroy/denature the protein?

Will this make the whey protein useless for muscle building?

This guy has a lot of recipies where he cooks whey for that long undr that heat and they all turn out fine…no denaturing of the protein.

http://people.smu.edu/jowillia/

[quote]RipStone wrote:
This guy has a lot of recipies where he cooks whey for that long undr that heat and they all turn out fine…no denaturing of the protein.

http://people.smu.edu/jowillia/[/quote]

??? Cooking does denature the protein. In fact, John Berardi and John Williams (“this guy”) of the Gourmet Nutrition cookbook writes: “cooking protein does denature it.” (pg. 161)

But denaturing isn’t bad. It’s like eating cooked beef, eggs, or chicken. Eating cooked protein powder will not affect your body composition results. It’s sill protein.

However, you won’t benefit from its life-giving properties – active peptides, digestive enzymes, and probiotics (excellent for acheiving beneficial flora in your gut) contained in minmially processed protein powders. Cooking will destroy them. If improving your health is your concern, don’t heat them.

I never cook my protein powder. But if you must, achieve balance: eat it cooked and eat it “raw.”

[quote]TommyRewind wrote:
RipStone wrote:
This guy has a lot of recipies where he cooks whey for that long undr that heat and they all turn out fine…no denaturing of the protein.

http://people.smu.edu/jowillia/

??? Cooking does denature the protein. In fact, John Berardi and John Williams (“this guy”) of the Gourmet Nutrition cookbook writes: “cooking protein does denature it.” (pg. 161)

But denaturing isn’t bad. It’s like eating cooked beef, eggs, or chicken. Eating cooked protein powder will not affect your body composition results. It’s sill protein.

However, you won’t benefit from its life-giving properties – active peptides, digestive enzymes, and probiotics (excellent for acheiving beneficial flora in your gut) contained in minmially processed protein powders. Cooking will destroy them. If improving your health is your concern, don’t heat them.

I never cook my protein powder. But if you must, achieve balance: eat it cooked and eat it “raw.”[/quote]

So lemme get this straight…cooking whey denatures it but you are still getting all the protein from they whey but not all the aminos? Is that correct?

Excellent repsonse Tommy. Yes the cooking will denature the protein to a degree and more importantly cause cross linkage of the proteins which creates by products that ultimately age you faster kinda of like free radicals. But the take home message is that most protein powders are flash pasteurized at high temperatures which will denature the proteins to some degree. If you make the brownies just consider them dead food like a piece of steak and use some enzymes with them!

this info is from the Gourmet Nutrition cook book … But it’s important to realize that denaturation isn’t
necessarily a bad thing. In fact when it comes to most
food sources of protein (eggs, meat, fish), it is generally
accepted that the cooking and subsequent
denaturation of these foods is a good thing. When
these foods are cooked, their physical properties
become changed (denatured). Yet once these foods are
in the GI tract, however, digestion takes over and
ultimately, all that protein is broken down (denatured
again) to its amino acid components for absorption
into the blood stream.
So as you can see; cooking denatures and so does
the body. But in the end, since it’s the amino acid content that’s
most important anyway and cooking your protein
doesn’t negatively impact on it, cooking your protein
might not be such a bad thing after all.

So what’s the great recipe for the protein brownies?

So denaturing the protein won’t affect its muscle building properties?

Doesn’t this question get asked about once a week?

Cooking food is fine. While heat does cause changes to occur, you do still get the amino acids via digestion anyway. It may not have the same absorption profile – but you will still get it.

As for cross-linking, I don’t imagine those issues are going to survive digestion either. Cross-linking within the body (advance glycolization end-products for example) is probably not due to the cooking process.

There are probiotics and things which can be affected by cooking or processing. Generally, in my opinion, most healthy people don’t have to worry about this or consume additional enzymes to digest their food appropriately.

Indeed, there are those that believe that denaturing and loss of probiotics is a huge issue.

I think all of these issues are incredibly miniscule compared to eating the right macronutrients at the right time, working out consistently and getting good recovery. So, personally, I can’t be bothered to worry about these issues.

In short, cook up the brownies, and send them to me, I’ll eat them.

[quote]BostonBarrister wrote:
So what’s the great recipe for the protein brownies?[/quote]

My thoughts exactly. To expand on what you and Vroom have said, it seems that about once a week someone posts a question about heating/mixing/finding ingredients for their “kick ass” protein brownies/muffin/bars, but they never post the damn recipe for us to try!

here is the Recipe;

Jason’s Peanut Butter Chocolate Protein Brownies

(per serving) Multiply quantities for multiple servings

1 ? scoops (1 ? oz.) of chocolate protein powder

1 tablespoon of natural peanut butter
1/3 cup of dry old fashion oatmeal
4 egg whites
3/4 cup unsweetened applesauce
1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract (optional)
3- 5 packets of splenda (optional)
1/4 nuts (optional) for topping

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Mix the egg whites and uncooked oatmeal, then add the remaining ingredients. Spray a nonstick cooking spray in baking dish. Pour/Spread the mixture in an even layer over the bottom of the dish and bake for about 20 minutes or until the edge starts to pull away from the sides. Let cool for 5 minutes and cut into squares.

This recipe is one originally found on T-Nation modified by trial and error for better taste and texture.

Jason’s Peanut Butter Chocolate Protein Brownies

(per serving) Multiply quantities for multiple servings

1 1/2 scoops (1 1/2 oz.) of chocolate protein powder

1 tablespoon of natural peanut butter
1/3 cup of dry old fashion oatmeal
4 egg whites
3/4 cup unsweetened applesauce
1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract (optional)
3- 5 packets of splenda (optional)
1/4 nuts (optional) for topping

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Mix the egg whites and uncooked oatmeal, then add the remaining ingredients. Spray a nonstick cooking spray in baking dish. Pour/Spread the mixture in an even layer over the bottom of the dish and bake for about 20 minutes or until the edge starts to pull away from the sides. Let cool for 5 minutes and cut into squares.

This recipe is one originally found on T-Nation modified by trial and error for better taste and texture.

[quote]fedorov91 wrote:

Jason’s Peanut Butter Chocolate Protein Brownies

(per serving) Multiply quantities for multiple servings

1 1/2 scoops (1 1/2 oz.) of chocolate protein powder

1 tablespoon of natural peanut butter
1/3 cup of dry old fashion oatmeal
4 egg whites
3/4 cup unsweetened applesauce
1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract (optional)
3- 5 packets of splenda (optional)
1/4 nuts (optional) for topping

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Mix the egg whites and uncooked oatmeal, then add the remaining ingredients. Spray a nonstick cooking spray in baking dish. Pour/Spread the mixture in an even layer over the bottom of the dish and bake for about 20 minutes or until the edge starts to pull away from the sides. Let cool for 5 minutes and cut into squares.

This recipe is one originally found on T-Nation modified by trial and error for better taste and texture.
[/quote]

Those sounds great! Any idea on the nutritional breakdown?

[quote]fedorov91 wrote:

Jason’s Peanut Butter Chocolate Protein Brownies

(per serving) Multiply quantities for multiple servings

1 1/2 scoops (1 1/2 oz.) of chocolate protein powder

1 tablespoon of natural peanut butter
1/3 cup of dry old fashion oatmeal
4 egg whites
3/4 cup unsweetened applesauce
1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract (optional)
3- 5 packets of splenda (optional)
1/4 nuts (optional) for topping

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Mix the egg whites and uncooked oatmeal, then add the remaining ingredients. Spray a nonstick cooking spray in baking dish. Pour/Spread the mixture in an even layer over the bottom of the dish and bake for about 20 minutes or until the edge starts to pull away from the sides. Let cool for 5 minutes and cut into squares.

This recipe is one originally found on T-Nation modified by trial and error for better taste and texture.
[/quote]

You can also make an apple cinnamon/raisin bar by substituting chocolate protein powder with vanilla. Add cinnamon, & raisins. Also, eliminate peanut butter.

No offense Vroom because in general I like your posts but in this aspect I’m afraid you couldn’t be further from the truth. There is no question that people, Americans especially, are chronically digesting their foods poorly. Take a look at the average colon and pounds of undigested waste(usually protein–cooked at that) and it should give you some clue that even “healthy” folks are unable to fully digest their foods these days. Its kind of irresponsible actually to suggest that the protein isn’t denatured and that there are no AGE’s from cooking it. I’m saying go ahead and eat it if you want but just know whats up with it. Hell there are people on this board suggesting that chocolate milk is an ok post workout drink. From an internal health perspective that kind of advice makes me cringe but people are gonna do what they want. But you shouldn’t kid yourself like that and think that there are no harmful effects from eating like that.

[quote]vroom wrote:
Doesn’t this question get asked about once a week?

Cooking food is fine. While heat does cause changes to occur, you do still get the amino acids via digestion anyway. It may not have the same absorption profile – but you will still get it.

As for cross-linking, I don’t imagine those issues are going to survive digestion either. Cross-linking within the body (advance glycolization end-products for example) is probably not due to the cooking process.

There are probiotics and things which can be affected by cooking or processing. Generally, in my opinion, most healthy people don’t have to worry about this or consume additional enzymes to digest their food appropriately.

Indeed, there are those that believe that denaturing and loss of probiotics is a huge issue.

I think all of these issues are incredibly miniscule compared to eating the right macronutrients at the right time, working out consistently and getting good recovery. So, personally, I can’t be bothered to worry about these issues.

In short, cook up the brownies, and send them to me, I’ll eat them.[/quote]

i recently cooked the brownies. they were ok, but a good way to get some clean carbs in. Good to section up and eat say 20 g sections.

I did a rough working, and i reckon per 100g of brownie its about (±10) 60 carbs, 30 protein, 10 fat.

This is rough, but i think accurate enough.

The protein powder i used was 2 g carb/25.
carbs in oatmeal is 75 per 100, 10 g protein
peanut butter is 30 protein/10 carbs.
Egg whites are, well egg whites but are fluid oz, so did a rough guess.

I added some dates and walnuts, and erred in favour of carbs in a rough calc.

Try adding coconut (non sweetened, organitc no preservative). with vanilla. quite nice.