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Bagsy's Training Log

Push press push press push press push press.

Also, push press.

Do it on an off day, not in place of strict. Go as heavy as you can. Then go heavier.

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I had this in my laundry list, but I’ll reiterate as I agree it’s one of the best things you can do. One of the best things I ever did for my pressing strength was to press to the heaviest weight I could strict press, then add weight and push press, then add more weight and push jerk. You may need to spend some time getting some proficiencies with those lifts, but give it a try.

Edit: I think the single arm pressing you’re doing will help you, as well. Adding unilateral work is underrated IMO.

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I’ll keep up what I’m doing for this cycle and potentially the next to see if I can eek out any progress. I was considering subbing bench supplemental work with push presses, which could be my next experiment. Unfortunately my schedule does not really allow a fifth day of lifting. I did a bit of push pressing in my earlier days, but it couldn’t hurt to reintroduce it if my pitiful press remains stagnant in the upcoming months

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6 hill sprints
1600m run 8:20

Awful

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And the mean thing is: You’re getting better at the barbell by gaining size and simultaneously worse at the body weight stuff (for a little while).

I actually started to focus on push presses with the few trainees I still have (all females). Strict press is just crap to progress on for them and I think the overall stimulus if the greater total weight is more beneficial. Just my 2c.

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No disagreement from me, I think it is overall more stimulating, and therefore, more beneficial. My own tendency to focus more on strict is probably more an ego thing…and also that it is a bit easier on the body.

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Agreed on that point. Althoufh for females it’s less overall fatiguing (generally speaking).

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Re: push pressing- I saw an Alsruhe video lately that blew my mind. He demonstrated doing the initial push with NO HANDS, transferring the energy from your body directly into the bar through your clavicle I guess.
The way I’ve done them, my arms are shock absorbers and leak energy, according to that approach. Anyone do it that way?
(I don’t mean hands-free, that was just his demonstration; but totally relaxed hands at the beginning)

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Yeah, he is exactly right. Your hands will obviously need to be under the bar, but they should be absolutely smashed into your clavicles to avoid losing energy. I have some issue with some lack of flexibility that annoys me, because I know I am leaking a bit.

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That’s how I’ve always done it pretty much.

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Yeah, this is probably what I need to accept most.

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This.

Edit: what they said.

Watched the same video and had no clue I’ve been doing them wrong this whole time

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Yea I’ll second that. I had no idea that’s how they were supposed to be done either.

It’s nothing new to you either, hehe. We’ve had this topic before. Your stated goals (or what I perceive them as) don’t always align with the approach you’re chosing. Such as the pretty aggressive diet.

If I may offer an alternative, and optimistic viewpoint, as one slowly adds bodyweight and gets stronger while still practicing the bodyweight movements, they may actually see progress in those numbers as the scale rises. That’s been my N=1 experience, especially with chins which seem to be most dramatically impacted by additional bodyweight.

For sure. That’s why I specified the temporary drop in calisthenics performance. Overall it won’t be lost, given one practises them and doesn’t go crazy on the weight gain.

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I totally missed that last part, haha. My bad dude.

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I think you have the impression that I’m trying to lose weight 24/7 when that is not the case. I finished a 6ish week weight loss phase a couple weeks ago and finished another one around November that was maybe 8ish weeks. Otherwise I had not dieted in years. Sure, most of that time was spent maintaining, but there were a couple serious phases of gaining weight. I’ll admit that maybe I wasn’t 100% right that my lifts are/were low enough that there was no reason I shouldn’t have been able to increase them at a fairly decent pace at maintenance calories for most of the year coupled with quality training (I don’t think effort is my issue).

Not to play “poor me,” but losing weight is never fun when you’re short and female. I prefer to be more aggressive if it’s going to suck anyway. After a little while at maintenance my strength returns. If I can’t improve my performance during fat loss, regardless of how fast it is, then I’d rather go quicker than spend more time on it – especially as losing fat is a lot easier than gaining strength or muscle, and I’d rather spend more time of the year on the latter. By losing a few pounds I gave myself more room to more confidently stick to the surplus for months, which is where I am currently.

TLDR; To me, short fat loss phases + more time at maintenance or surplus > longer, slower fat loss phases + less time at maintenance or surplus.