T Nation

Bad Habits You Can't Shake

grizzly longcut wintergreen, ive quit a total of about 13 months in the past 7 years and most of the times due to elevated blood pressure while cycling. i quit smoking weed years ago no problem i quit drinking everytime im on cycle no problem, but that god damn grizzley longcut winter green i cant seem to shake it. and internet porn too definatley even when im in a relationship except on pct lol.

For habits that are not strongly connected to a dopamine response (unfortunately both of yours appear to be), I have found that the best way, for me, to completely rid myself of a habit is to NOT quit it. What I do is WRITE DOWN my conviction first to just keep away from the object of my desire for 30 days. Recently I had a terrible addition to Red Bull. Before that Diet Coke. In both cases, I wrote something to the effect of: I will drink only water or juice for the next 30 days. (You should write in the positive, not the negative, so don’t write: I will NOT dip for the next 30 days).

As far as dopamine related addictions, the solution is not always so easy, but, again, it requires first visualizing yourself as someone who would NEVER indulge in such habits.

There are a couple of very, very good threads here about quitting internet porn. I highly recommend you read them.

Dude you look pretty big, how come we haven’t heard of you?

[quote]Cortes wrote:
For habits that are not strongly connected to a dopamine response (unfortunately both of yours appear to be), I have found that the best way, for me, to completely rid myself of a habit is to NOT quit it. What I do is WRITE DOWN my conviction first to just keep away from the object of my desire for 30 days. Recently I had a terrible addition to Red Bull. Before that Diet Coke. In both cases, I wrote something to the effect of: I will drink only water or juice for the next 30 days. (You should write in the positive, not the negative, so don’t write: I will NOT dip for the next 30 days).

As far as dopamine related addictions, the solution is not always so easy, but, again, it requires first visualizing yourself as someone who would NEVER indulge in such habits.

There are a couple of very, very good threads here about quitting internet porn. I highly recommend you read them. [/quote]

Don’t tell me you cut out caffeine for good!?!?

That would be my vice. TV for sure as well. I’m real good about the TV thing when I live on my own but when there’s other people in the house that watch it all the time it’s hard not to. And when you try to leave the room to be productive somewhere they always try to guilt me and play passive aggressive and tempt me. This is family I’m talking about.

I used to smoke a ton of pot, but when I had a really good reason to quit which is looking for a real job it wasn’t all that hard to stop. It sucked the first few weeks. To be totally honest I still crave it from time to time but it passes fairly quickly at this point.

Habits*

Correcting people’s spelling and grammar. Bad one for me.

Another habit I hate is that I can’t seem to summon the self discipline to stick to my diet. It’s affecting my training and football, but I just can’t stick to what I need to do :frowning:

[quote]Fletch1986 wrote:

[quote]Cortes wrote:
For habits that are not strongly connected to a dopamine response (unfortunately both of yours appear to be), I have found that the best way, for me, to completely rid myself of a habit is to NOT quit it. What I do is WRITE DOWN my conviction first to just keep away from the object of my desire for 30 days. Recently I had a terrible addition to Red Bull. Before that Diet Coke. In both cases, I wrote something to the effect of: I will drink only water or juice for the next 30 days. (You should write in the positive, not the negative, so don’t write: I will NOT dip for the next 30 days).

As far as dopamine related addictions, the solution is not always so easy, but, again, it requires first visualizing yourself as someone who would NEVER indulge in such habits.

There are a couple of very, very good threads here about quitting internet porn. I highly recommend you read them. [/quote]

Don’t tell me you cut out caffeine for good!?!?

That would be my vice. TV for sure as well. I’m real good about the TV thing when I live on my own but when there’s other people in the house that watch it all the time it’s hard not to. And when you try to leave the room to be productive somewhere they always try to guilt me and play passive aggressive and tempt me. This is family I’m talking about.

I used to smoke a ton of pot, but when I had a really good reason to quit which is looking for a real job it wasn’t all that hard to stop. It sucked the first few weeks. To be totally honest I still crave it from time to time but it passes fairly quickly at this point. [/quote]

I didn’t cut out caffeine at all, which I’ve never really felt to be a problem of mine, but all the HFCS and the unnecessarily high expense of the Red Bull needed to go.

When from about 17 to 19 or 20 I smoked more weed than Snoop Dog. My best friend and I used to go to his house for lunch, take a bunch of hits off a bong and then stuff our faces before heading back for classes. Then came home after and got high twice more before any given day was over. Pulled all A’s this entire time, but I was getting deeper and deeper into a lifestyle and peer group that was unhealthy, to say the least. One day, we were smoking at some guys apartment and, while high, I had a stunning, almost blinding moment of clarity. I looked at the apartment, the stupid Bob Marley posters on the wall, the brain dead people I was with with the contents of their skulls oozing out of their ears as they vegetated in front of a TV screen, and I have always hated TV, sorry Fletch (^^)v, and I just heard the thought, THIS IS NOT FOR YOU, in my head before feeling the most intense paranoia and agitation of my life. After that moment, I could never again smoke weed without that feeling of paranoia, stress and general unease. It went from my favorite pastime to the most hated feeling I could imagine. After a couple more attempts at getting high, I just quit forever. All my friends, the non-loser ones, I kept hanging out with, and they kept smoking weed, and they just couldn’t understand it. They would offer me read every single time I was around for the first few months or so, and they just couldn’t understand that I just could not even imagine smoking anymore after that. After a while they got used to it and they started to get used to the fact that I could still enjoy myself without being high.

After my moment of clarity with marijuana, I later quit drinking, and the way I quit drinking (which I have explained here a few times) was very very similar to the way in which I quit smoking weed. And also similar to the way in which I quit smoking cigarettes. In every case, it involved pretty much a single moment where I went from intensely desiring thing, to not having any more desire for the thing at all. It was almost an overnight transformation. In cases such as these, I think the first, most important aspect of the quitting process, is that the person who is quitting has to truly, seriously, intensely desire to be free from the slavery of addiction to that drug. Anyone who doesn’t quit an addiction, never reaches this point. This point is the most important point in the process of quitting, and freeing oneself from addiction.

I always bite my fingernails…I’m working on it though, slowly but surely.

[quote]Cortes wrote:

[quote]Fletch1986 wrote:

[quote]Cortes wrote:
For habits that are not strongly connected to a dopamine response (unfortunately both of yours appear to be), I have found that the best way, for me, to completely rid myself of a habit is to NOT quit it. What I do is WRITE DOWN my conviction first to just keep away from the object of my desire for 30 days. Recently I had a terrible addition to Red Bull. Before that Diet Coke. In both cases, I wrote something to the effect of: I will drink only water or juice for the next 30 days. (You should write in the positive, not the negative, so don’t write: I will NOT dip for the next 30 days).

As far as dopamine related addictions, the solution is not always so easy, but, again, it requires first visualizing yourself as someone who would NEVER indulge in such habits.

There are a couple of very, very good threads here about quitting internet porn. I highly recommend you read them. [/quote]

Don’t tell me you cut out caffeine for good!?!?

That would be my vice. TV for sure as well. I’m real good about the TV thing when I live on my own but when there’s other people in the house that watch it all the time it’s hard not to. And when you try to leave the room to be productive somewhere they always try to guilt me and play passive aggressive and tempt me. This is family I’m talking about.

I used to smoke a ton of pot, but when I had a really good reason to quit which is looking for a real job it wasn’t all that hard to stop. It sucked the first few weeks. To be totally honest I still crave it from time to time but it passes fairly quickly at this point. [/quote]

I didn’t cut out caffeine at all, which I’ve never really felt to be a problem of mine, but all the HFCS and the unnecessarily high expense of the Red Bull needed to go.

When from about 17 to 19 or 20 I smoked more weed than Snoop Dog. My best friend and I used to go to his house for lunch, take a bunch of hits off a bong and then stuff our faces before heading back for classes. Then came home after and got high twice more before any given day was over. Pulled all A’s this entire time, but I was getting deeper and deeper into a lifestyle and peer group that was unhealthy, to say the least. One day, we were smoking at some guys apartment and, while high, I had a stunning, almost blinding moment of clarity. I looked at the apartment, the stupid Bob Marley posters on the wall, the brain dead people I was with with the contents of their skulls oozing out of their ears as they vegetated in front of a TV screen, and I have always hated TV, sorry Fletch (^^)v, and I just heard the thought, THIS IS NOT FOR YOU, in my head before feeling the most intense paranoia and agitation of my life. After that moment, I could never again smoke weed without that feeling of paranoia, stress and general unease. It went from my favorite pastime to the most hated feeling I could imagine. After a couple more attempts at getting high, I just quit forever. All my friends, the non-loser ones, I kept hanging out with, and they kept smoking weed, and they just couldn’t understand it. They would offer me read every single time I was around for the first few months or so, and they just couldn’t understand that I just could not even imagine smoking anymore after that. After a while they got used to it and they started to get used to the fact that I could still enjoy myself without being high.

After my moment of clarity with marijuana, I later quit drinking, and the way I quit drinking (which I have explained here a few times) was very very similar to the way in which I quit smoking weed. And also similar to the way in which I quit smoking cigarettes. In every case, it involved pretty much a single moment where I went from intensely desiring thing, to not having any more desire for the thing at all. It was almost an overnight transformation. In cases such as these, I think the first, most important aspect of the quitting process, is that the person who is quitting has to truly, seriously, intensely desire to be free from the slavery of addiction to that drug. Anyone who doesn’t quit an addiction, never reaches this point. This point is the most important point in the process of quitting, and freeing oneself from addiction.[/quote]

Sounds like for you it was a suddle deep shift in something… even having an intuitive voice… very wise… I wish my brother could hopefully find the same soon, on a side note some of your posts indicate to me that you are pretty well connected to something, maybe you are like the buddha and don’t even know it lol

I am addicted to abortions
But no seriously addiction is a mofo.
Habits on the other hand usually aren’t so bad.
Having a gambling habit and a gambling addiction are two different problems.
For me I’ve quit ciggarrettes fairly easily after basic training I could not smoke anymore.
Weed was easy for the same reasons as Cortes. I just did not like the ppl or lifestyle it involved.
But drugs, real drugs. That’s always been a problem for me.
Be grateful for your tobacco addiction
B thankful u can’t get felonies for dip lol
And if u really want to stop I think I’d try making myself impossibly sick from it and eat a whole can or something so that the thought of dipping reviled you.

[quote]cstratton2 wrote:

[quote]Cortes wrote:

[quote]Fletch1986 wrote:

[quote]Cortes wrote:
For habits that are not strongly connected to a dopamine response (unfortunately both of yours appear to be), I have found that the best way, for me, to completely rid myself of a habit is to NOT quit it. What I do is WRITE DOWN my conviction first to just keep away from the object of my desire for 30 days. Recently I had a terrible addition to Red Bull. Before that Diet Coke. In both cases, I wrote something to the effect of: I will drink only water or juice for the next 30 days. (You should write in the positive, not the negative, so don’t write: I will NOT dip for the next 30 days).

As far as dopamine related addictions, the solution is not always so easy, but, again, it requires first visualizing yourself as someone who would NEVER indulge in such habits.

There are a couple of very, very good threads here about quitting internet porn. I highly recommend you read them. [/quote]

Don’t tell me you cut out caffeine for good!?!?

That would be my vice. TV for sure as well. I’m real good about the TV thing when I live on my own but when there’s other people in the house that watch it all the time it’s hard not to. And when you try to leave the room to be productive somewhere they always try to guilt me and play passive aggressive and tempt me. This is family I’m talking about.

I used to smoke a ton of pot, but when I had a really good reason to quit which is looking for a real job it wasn’t all that hard to stop. It sucked the first few weeks. To be totally honest I still crave it from time to time but it passes fairly quickly at this point. [/quote]

I didn’t cut out caffeine at all, which I’ve never really felt to be a problem of mine, but all the HFCS and the unnecessarily high expense of the Red Bull needed to go.

When from about 17 to 19 or 20 I smoked more weed than Snoop Dog. My best friend and I used to go to his house for lunch, take a bunch of hits off a bong and then stuff our faces before heading back for classes. Then came home after and got high twice more before any given day was over. Pulled all A’s this entire time, but I was getting deeper and deeper into a lifestyle and peer group that was unhealthy, to say the least. One day, we were smoking at some guys apartment and, while high, I had a stunning, almost blinding moment of clarity. I looked at the apartment, the stupid Bob Marley posters on the wall, the brain dead people I was with with the contents of their skulls oozing out of their ears as they vegetated in front of a TV screen, and I have always hated TV, sorry Fletch (^^)v, and I just heard the thought, THIS IS NOT FOR YOU, in my head before feeling the most intense paranoia and agitation of my life. After that moment, I could never again smoke weed without that feeling of paranoia, stress and general unease. It went from my favorite pastime to the most hated feeling I could imagine. After a couple more attempts at getting high, I just quit forever. All my friends, the non-loser ones, I kept hanging out with, and they kept smoking weed, and they just couldn’t understand it. They would offer me read every single time I was around for the first few months or so, and they just couldn’t understand that I just could not even imagine smoking anymore after that. After a while they got used to it and they started to get used to the fact that I could still enjoy myself without being high.

After my moment of clarity with marijuana, I later quit drinking, and the way I quit drinking (which I have explained here a few times) was very very similar to the way in which I quit smoking weed. And also similar to the way in which I quit smoking cigarettes. In every case, it involved pretty much a single moment where I went from intensely desiring thing, to not having any more desire for the thing at all. It was almost an overnight transformation. In cases such as these, I think the first, most important aspect of the quitting process, is that the person who is quitting has to truly, seriously, intensely desire to be free from the slavery of addiction to that drug. Anyone who doesn’t quit an addiction, never reaches this point. This point is the most important point in the process of quitting, and freeing oneself from addiction.[/quote]

Sounds like for you it was a suddle deep shift in something… even having an intuitive voice… very wise… I wish my brother could hopefully find the same soon, on a side note some of your posts indicate to me that you are pretty well connected to something, maybe you are like the buddha and don’t even know it lol [/quote]

One of my biggest “secrets”: Deep, intense, prayer. Don’t expect most people to take that seriously, but I could not have found my way out from certain of my addictions on my own. No way. I don’t possess that kind of strength.

[quote]tonypluto wrote:
I am addicted to abortions
But no seriously addiction is a mofo.
Habits on the other hand usually aren’t so bad.
Having a gambling habit and a gambling addiction are two different problems.
For me I’ve quit ciggarrettes fairly easily after basic training I could not smoke anymore.
Weed was easy for the same reasons as Cortes. I just did not like the ppl or lifestyle it involved.
But drugs, real drugs. That’s always been a problem for me.
Be grateful for your tobacco addiction
B thankful u can’t get felonies for dip lol
And if u really want to stop I think I’d try making myself impossibly sick from it and eat a whole can or something so that the thought of dipping reviled you.[/quote]

This is actually a good point. HABITS are quite different animals than ADDICTIONS, and should be approached in a completely different manner than the one I described in my first post on this thread. There are different numbers that get thrown around, but most psychologists and people who study the brain agree that it takes around one full month to start a new habit or rid oneself of an old one. That’s why I suggested one month. Also, I suggest the one month method because the brain naturally fights against having to give up something that it has already got momentum doing. We don’t like to give up things that we’ve already established a pattern of doing. However you can trick your brain, by telling it that you’re not actually giving it up, you’re just taking a break. I actually literally tell myself that, if I so desire, I can and will start doing that thing again after the 30 days is up. I just won’t do it for these 30 days. But what ends up happening is that I no longer have any desire to do that thing again after the 30 days. To tell the truth, I usually lose all desire for the thing after only about three days when I use this method.

Once again, though, I must reiterate that this method is ONLY good for habits. Actual addictions need to be approached in a completely different manner. I used to do 30 to 40 day periods of no drinking all the time back in my alcoholic days. For that addiction, I was literally counting the days until I could drink again. And as soon as I could drink again, buddy it was on.

[quote]Rico Suave wrote:
I always bite my fingernails…I’m working on it though, slowly but surely.[/quote]

http://www.hypnotictapes.com

Not joking. It’s a bit pricey but if you use the four part system in the manner in which he prescribes, I am almost completely confident that you will not only stop your habit, but that you won’t even notice you’ve stopped it for a while, it will be so effective.

Hypnotism does not work for everyone, and some people are far more susceptible than others, but for anyone who has this kind of obsessive-compulsive type addiction and has not yet tried it, I cannot recommend it strongly enough.

This can also apply to anything else one may want to start or stop, do more of or do less of. He has some really insane titles in his library. Fear of asteroids? No problem? Fear of urine? Not anymore. Have a browse through. There are some REALLY good titles, as well. I’ve spent quite a bit of money on his site and cannot, REALLY cannot recommend his method and CDs (no, they aren’t actually tapes) highly enough.

[quote]02Thief wrote:
Habits*

Correcting people’s spelling and grammar. Bad one for me.

Another habit I hate is that I can’t seem to summon the self discipline to stick to my diet. It’s affecting my training and football, but I just can’t stick to what I need to do :([/quote]

You need to employ visualization. This is the root of most diet and training failures. People put the cart before the horse and just jump right into a diet and training program for an elite athlete, while they still think of themselves as the type of person who doesn’t eat that way, doesn’t train that way, doesn’t look like that, and doesn’t live like that. Big mistake. The mind muscle connection is a lot more important than just something to be employed in the gym. This is why all diets and training programs by beginners and those not already in the habit should be WRITTEN, in detail, for at least 12 weeks in advance. All exercises, meals, your body, how your clothes fit, how you feel, the kinds of reactions you will get, even the cooking, should be vividly imagined beforehand. A lot.

As far as your first habit, we need MORE of that one. (^_^)b

I got a bad habit of being good looking. Its hard to quit.

[quote]Gettnitdone wrote:
Dude you look pretty big, how come we haven’t heard of you?[/quote]
because i never really had much to say i would just cruise the site for funny shit like im 19 6’10" 165lbs diet is beast and im running a gram of test tren deca winsrtol anavar a week. and laugh. but now im more of a personable person i guess i got rid of the nagging bitch that so much of my effort was directed towards and im up at night with the ol tren insomnia so i figured id start posting after 2 years of cruising.

Thanks for the insight Cortes.

  1. What was it about diet coke that you felt you needed to quit?
  2. What kind of habits/addictions lead to dopamine response? My main one I guess is sugar and that’s lead to not maintaining my diet or emotional responses as a result of falling off the wagon. I read your last post on planning ahead and will implement that more seriously. Also to write what I want to do in the positive.

I have others which I’d rather not bring up here, would it be okay to PM you?

[quote]tonypluto wrote:
I am addicted to abortions
But no seriously addiction is a mofo.
Habits on the other hand usually aren’t so bad.
Having a gambling habit and a gambling addiction are two different problems.
For me I’ve quit ciggarrettes fairly easily after basic training I could not smoke anymore.
Weed was easy for the same reasons as Cortes. I just did not like the ppl or lifestyle it involved.
But drugs, real drugs. That’s always been a problem for me.
Be grateful for your tobacco addiction
B thankful u can’t get felonies for dip lol
And if u really want to stop I think I’d try making myself impossibly sick from it and eat a whole can or something so that the thought of dipping reviled you.[/quote]

im actually kidding myself when i say its a bad habit as opposed to an addiction. Ive been on the other side of the fence and managed to get myself some charges and cought some state time among many county visits. I was in trouble from 18-26 all the time, assaults, possesions w/intent,duis. The day my son was born, things changed and now it seems so far in the past as if it never happened.

But when I look back on it all ive always had a chew in, even in prison i managed have some. I guess the fact that its legal has me programed to believe its a bad habit and not an addiction. As for the make yourself sick with it I did that one time in little league baseball my best friend stole his dads redman and 3 of us put little chaws in and went out to warm up with in 3 mins the whole outfield was spinning and we all puked eventually the other 2 kids parents took them home my punishment was i had to play sick.

I did quit for my blood test for life insurance i did that with beef jerky i might try that again im starting to get sick of it. When i go out on a date i leave it home so i dont gross the chick out immediatly and all i can think about is getting home for a chew unless shes throwing the vag at me right of the break.

[quote]Cortes wrote:
For habits that are not strongly connected to a dopamine response (unfortunately both of yours appear to be), I have found that the best way, for me, to completely rid myself of a habit is to NOT quit it. What I do is WRITE DOWN my conviction first to just keep away from the object of my desire for 30 days. Recently I had a terrible addition to Red Bull. Before that Diet Coke. In both cases, I wrote something to the effect of: I will drink only water or juice for the next 30 days. (You should write in the positive, not the negative, so don’t write: I will NOT dip for the next 30 days).

As far as dopamine related addictions, the solution is not always so easy, but, again, it requires first visualizing yourself as someone who would NEVER indulge in such habits.

There are a couple of very, very good threads here about quitting internet porn. I highly recommend you read them. [/quote]

Im going to try this with beef jerky like i did the last time i quit. I will only eat beef jerky for the next thirty days or something to that effect. I write my diet out and follow it so I see where your going with that ive never thought of this and its a great idea.

Cortes-do you recommend any sources for learning visualization? I have the book Psycho-Cybernetics by Maxwell Maltz, which is an excellent book for changing the self image. I’m serious about school, but I want to make myself much more focused.

I can relate to the moments of clarity. I used to do nothing but play videogames in my free time. One day I stopped, put down the controller and thought about it for awhile. I realized that I was doing absolutely nothing for my intellectual, or social development, and it just stopped being fun. I’ve played videogames perhaps ten times in the past five years.

There was another moment of clarity when I was younger. One day I was sick of being weak and unconfident, so I joined the football team. Nuff said.

Disclaimer: Long time lurker blah blah

[quote]roadwarrior83 wrote:

[quote]Gettnitdone wrote:
Dude you look pretty big, how come we haven’t heard of you?[/quote]
because i never really had much to say i would just cruise the site for funny shit like im 19 6’10" 165lbs diet is beast and im running a gram of test tren deca winsrtol anavar a week. and laugh. but now im more of a personable person i guess i got rid of the nagging bitch that so much of my effort was directed towards and im up at night with the ol tren insomnia so i figured id start posting after 2 years of cruising.[/quote]

Haha. I like you already man. You and I would have been friends quick back when I was still posting on the Steroid forum if we’d met there.

*edited