Backpack for Weighted Pull-ups?

Backpacks work fine to a point. I’ve used and still use them to load pushups, hspu, dips pullups and rows. They’re not the ideal loader…but they work

I’ve used a weighted backpack for pull ups in the past. Pack it with some clothes or blankets, throw a single 10 or 25 lb. plate in there and pack some clothes/blankets on top to center the plate.

A tidbit of advice: I found it far easier to balance myself front loading the backpack, i.e. wearing the backpack in front of chest as opposed to on my back.

I’ve used a weighted vest and prefer this over the belt. I have a long-standing back problem and it flared up badly following a session using heavy weights on a belt. That was the first thing my chiro told me to drop during treatment.

That said, a belt is fine with lighter loads. I have also experimented with chains (good - and you feel like Rocky in the process!); and I have also looped a band around my waist and slung a DB in it. The downward band stretch from the momentum creates a different type of resistance compared to standard belt.

So for me it would be vest or chains.

[quote]JamesBrawn007 wrote:
I’ve used a weighted vest and prefer this over the belt. I have a long-standing back problem and it flared up badly following a session using heavy weights on a belt. That was the first thing my chiro told me to drop during treatment.

That said, a belt is fine with lighter loads. I have also experimented with chains (good - and you feel like Rocky in the process!); and I have also looped a band around my waist and slung a DB in it. The downward band stretch from the momentum creates a different type of resistance compared to standard belt.

So for me it would be vest or chains.[/quote]

The spectre of a low back injury is always on my mind (which, as counter-intuitive as it may seem to some people, is why I deadlift on a consistent basis).

I see guys cinching up on the chain length so the plates are practically squishing their junk. This, I theorize, makes the movement easier (less stabilization required) but the cost is it makes it easier to drive the pelvis into anterior tilt (which is often a precursor to low back irritation or injury). Of course, the belt design also makes a difference and how well it’s broken in (for the leather ones, anyway).

I’m not trying to marginalize your comment. And I’m not saying the above applies to you. However, I am curious as to the nature of your low-back injury, the belt you use, and the set up.

I ask this because weighted pull ups with a belt actually improves my low back health. The weight helps decompress the spine. And the way I set up the belt (weight hanging as low as possible without touching the floor during the movement) forces me to drive my pelvis into posterior tilt and thereby strengthens my rectus/tva/obliques - which obviously helps with low-back health. I will say that my belt has broken in and better conforms to me now; and this definitely makes a difference.