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Backpack for Weighted Pull-ups?


#1

Is it effective to use a weighted backpack for weighted pull-ups? I don't have one of those belts.


#2

Stick your legs through the straps and it will hang down like a weight belt…


#3

It’s more effective than NOT using a backpack. Why not just get one of those belts though?

Alternatively, you can take a lengthy of 3/8 chain, run it through a plate/dumbbell and clip it around your waist with a heavy duty carabineer.


#4

Stick the dumbell between your legs… Not too high though ouch.

Great for drop sets.


#5

Thank you. So I assume the belt is more effective.


#6

[quote]bobby bennett wrote:
Thank you. So I assume the belt is more effective.[/quote]

Yup.


#7

[quote]bobby bennett wrote:
So I assume the belt is more effective.[/quote]

Backpack works in a pinch and it’s obviously better served for push ups, one arm push ups, things like that.

A good belt should last you a lifetime. Just visit an old school gym and take a look at the house belt they let members use.

I bought a mediocre belt back in 2010 and the only thing I had to replace was the clip.

As you get stronger, the shoulder straps on a heavily loaded backpack (without waist straps) might interfere with scapular movement. This is just a theory on my part because I primarily use a belt for dips and pulls.

The only time I use a weighted backpack on pull up variation is a movement where you do a dip with one arm and simultaneously pull up with the another; with the torso and legs forming an ‘L’ position. Unlike traditional weighted pull ups or dips, it’s not something I can go really heavy on and I just move better with a pack for that particular exercise. If/when I get strong enough to ditch the pack, I’ll have to figure out how to incorporate a belt that doesn’t hinder execution.

Another advantage of using a belt is it’s a good way to blast the core. It takes practice but once you learn to squeeze the pelvis into posterior tilt and hold it for the set, it forces the rectus, tva, internal/external obliques into an isometric contraction. The tilt doesn’t have to be exaggerated at all; point the knees slightly out, squeeze the glutes, feel the lower back go into a neutral position. I wouldn’t consider it a main core movement - just a nice benefit to doing weighted pull ups with a belt.

Do not attempt to kip, butterfly or do any laughable swinging with a belt and weight on. If you don’t believe me, try to visualize what that would look like. And for the sake of healthy elbows, more isn’t better.


#8

Hey!
I’ve been playing with weighted pull ups for a long time now, because they are a classic training for climbers. In my experience, a backpack will very soon become very uncomfortable due to how it will pull your shoulders down when heavily loaded. The straps become a bulky hindrance when lowering because they will be pressed by your delts.

A belt is far better and will last you a lifetime.
Usually you see people wearing the belt in the normal way, attaching the weights on the front, usually to the buckle. I’ve done this for years, and I’ve found that it’s far better to wear the belt so that the buckle and the weights are at your back.

Having the weight on the front exaggerates the anterior tilt of the pelvis and can become very very dangerous for your lower back because with a heavy load it will arch a lot.
I hope this helps.


#9

I have second the chain method with carabiner clips. I used foam on top of the chain though. The weighted back pack good for about 50lb.
I have an old jacket which I loaded with little sandbags too.

I used to do an exercise where I would hang from a bar with as much weight as possible . I don’t recommend it though. I used a barbell eventually. False grip over scaffolding.

The chain method is good for belt squats too. I don’t like the sold versions , they are inferior to what you can build cheaply. The ironmind one might be good but it will also be expensive.


#10

[quote]lorenzino wrote:

Usually you see people wearing the belt in the normal way, attaching the weights on the front, usually to the buckle. I’ve done this for years, and I’ve found that it’s far better to wear the belt so that the buckle and the weights are at your back.
[/quote]

Not sure what type of belt you’re using.

The one I own has long enough chains (as all good models should) so the weight moves towards the plum line. And because I squeeze my glutes to go into posterior pelvic tilt (most people who do non-kip pull ups do this instinctively to better engage mid traps/rhomboids), the weight shifts in line with the hips or slightly behind. Therefore, what you’re describing is a non-issue for me. If anything, the stiff and wide back support on my belt SUPPORTS my lumbar spine from danger because I know immediately if it goes out of neutral.

The good dipping/pull up belts have that specific design (wide in the back; taper towards the front) for a reason. So unless a person is doing unconventional pull ups, I see no logic in wearing it backwards.


#11

[quote]lorenzino wrote:

Having the weight on the front exaggerates the anterior tilt of the pelvis and can become very very dangerous for your lower back because with a heavy load it will arch a lot.
I hope this helps. [/quote]

Thank you for the info! I too used to love doing weighted pullups until I started having back issues stemming from incorrect weight lifting.
I found as the weight got higher that I started having problems with the weighted pullups which I initially thought would be safe for my back. So I have gotten away from doing them but will now give this a try with the buckle being behind me.


#12

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:
It’s more effective than NOT using a backpack. Why not just get one of those belts though?

Alternatively, you can take a lengthy of 3/8 chain, run it through a plate/dumbbell and clip it around your waist with a heavy duty carabineer. [/quote]

This.

Although, in my experience, a belt will be cheaper than the chains.


#13

[quote]dagill2 wrote:

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:
It’s more effective than NOT using a backpack. Why not just get one of those belts though?

Alternatively, you can take a lengthy of 3/8 chain, run it through a plate/dumbbell and clip it around your waist with a heavy duty carabineer. [/quote]

This.

Although, in my experience, a belt will be cheaper than the chains.[/quote]

Depending on the belt, definitely. But 3/8 chain will also never break, haha. At least, not with the loads that a human would use for weighted dips.

I use the Ironmind dip belt, which is a little pricer than most, but weighs next to nothing while being indestructible. I’ve had some more tragic experiences with some cheaper belts.


#14

Thank you very much for your input.


#15

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:

[quote]dagill2 wrote:

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:
It’s more effective than NOT using a backpack. Why not just get one of those belts though?

Alternatively, you can take a lengthy of 3/8 chain, run it through a plate/dumbbell and clip it around your waist with a heavy duty carabineer. [/quote]

This.

Although, in my experience, a belt will be cheaper than the chains.[/quote]

Depending on the belt, definitely. But 3/8 chain will also never break, haha. At least, not with the loads that a human would use for weighted dips.

I use the Ironmind dip belt, which is a little pricer than most, but weighs next to nothing while being indestructible. I’ve had some more tragic experiences with some cheaper belts.
[/quote]

I’ve used a cheap/nasty belt for the last year or so. It does have a major flaw/bonus in that the weight plates hang at about ball-level, which is one of the best incentives to keep your reps smooth and controlled that I’ve come across yet.


#16

Thank you for your helpful comments.


#17

[quote]MinotaurXXX wrote:

[quote]lorenzino wrote:

Usually you see people wearing the belt in the normal way, attaching the weights on the front, usually to the buckle. I’ve done this for years, and I’ve found that it’s far better to wear the belt so that the buckle and the weights are at your back.
[/quote]

Not sure what type of belt you’re using.

The one I own has long enough chains (as all good models should) so the weight moves towards the plum line. And because I squeeze my glutes to go into posterior pelvic tilt (most people who do non-kip pull ups do this instinctively to better engage mid traps/rhomboids), the weight shifts in line with the hips or slightly behind. Therefore, what you’re describing is a non-issue for me. If anything, the stiff and wide back support on my belt SUPPORTS my lumbar spine from danger because I know immediately if it goes out of neutral.

The good dipping/pull up belts have that specific design (wide in the back; taper towards the front) for a reason. So unless a person is doing unconventional pull ups, I see no logic in wearing it backwards. [/quote]
I get what you mean.
I was using the waist belt of a climbing harness with the weights attached to the belay loop, so pretty out of the middle line of the body.
I imagine that the good dipping belts are much longer and designed to sit more along the hips than specifically around the waist.


#18

I only use them for weighted pull ups when I lift at home and I have loaded over 60 pounds in them before. The only downside is that as it gets heavier it pulls you back unless you have a second back pack to counter balance. There is also skin pinching and it can be uncomfortable. Aside from that you shouldn’t run into any issues. Keep the straps loose, have a firm set of steel balls, and go have fun doing heavy ass pull ups.

Also I will personally never buy a dip belt, I like this set up for the most for my home gym.


#19

[quote]Destrength wrote:
Also I will personally never buy a dip belt, I like this set up for the most for my home gym. [/quote]

You’ll be amazed the things you end up buying if you stick with this long enough.

I’ve got a Metal Jack Deadlifter in my garage that I’ve only worn twice, and never in competition, haha.


#20

[quote]Destrength wrote:
I only use them for weighted pull ups when I lift at home and I have loaded over 60 pounds in them before. The only downside is that as it gets heavier it pulls you back unless you have a second back pack to counter balance. There is also skin pinching and it can be uncomfortable. Aside from that you shouldn’t run into any issues. Keep the straps loose, have a firm set of steel balls, and go have fun doing heavy ass pull ups.

Also I will personally never buy a dip belt, I like this set up for the most for my home gym. [/quote]

I own a pretty nice internal frame back pack with padded shoulder straps, padded waist straps and various gizmos that allow the pack to move surprisingly well with the body. I guess that’s an option but it’ll end up being more costly than the average belt.

I just don’t know what the upper limit is on how much a typical backpack can hold before the seams burst.

So, I still say a good or very good dipping/pull up belt is a worthy investment for anyone strong enough to graduate to heavier weights.

I purchased a cord from a rock climbing shop that’s rated above and beyond what I need. I use this cord to extend the overall effective length of the chain. This allows the plates to hang lower and drift towards that plumb line.

And because this set up forces me to engage my core (as stated in earlier post), I get more bang for my buck. I also have to stabilize a bit more due to the longer distance the plates are from my body.

The way I see it, compound movements are SUPPOSED to reveal weakness(es) so I can address them. Once those weakness(es) are brought up, I can, at my choosing, use little tricks to move more weight.