T Nation

Back Rounding on Deadlifting

(post deleted by the author)

You should probably read these:

Also, I don’t remember if it was mentioned in the above articles, but it has been recommended that you do not increase the weight until you can do it with correct form. I have also heard that some coaches will not let you deadlift from the floor until you demonstrate the required flexibility to do it correctly and will have you do a partial range of motion until you do.

ive been having the same problem. basically i have to “squat” mroe than deadlift the weight up scrping the heck out of my knees so as to keep my back from rounding.

Kane,

If you remember that Cressey video, then you may remember the dialogue that followed. A bunch of people pointed out the back rounding, and his response was that thoracic spine rounding is cool, so long as it’s low to moderate in degree; lumbar flexion is what causes back problems while deadlifting.

It may have been a cop-out, but I doubt it.

I’d second Vader’s recommendation for rack pulls until you get the flexibility to deadlift from the floor though.

[quote]cynical kane wrote:
So do you think I should stop deadlifting until I’m flexible enough to have a completely tight lower back at the bottom?[/quote]

You don’t need to quit deadlifting, you can try either of the suggestions until you can do it correctly. You can really screw yourself up doing deadlifts with bad form (experience talking here), so I’d always make sure my form was perfect.

[quote]Otep wrote:
Kane,

If you remember that Cressey video, then you may remember the dialogue that followed. A bunch of people pointed out the back rounding, and his response was that thoracic spine rounding is cool, so long as it’s low to moderate in degree; lumbar flexion is what causes back problems while deadlifting.

It may have been a cop-out, but I doubt it.

I’d second Vader’s recommendation for rack pulls until you get the flexibility to deadlift from the floor though.[/quote]

Yeah rounding of the thoracic spine won’t do any harm that I know of, Dave Tate actually recommends it to get more weight out of the lift.

http://www.T-Nation.com/article/supplements/the_dead_zone&cr=

Tate and Cressey are strong as f***, and they have a very specific goal, lift as much as humanly possible. Rounded back deadlifts shorten the distance you need to pull, and an advance lifter can use it to add a few pounds to the lift. Unless you’re an advanced lifter, keep your back straight and focus on your form. Worry about rounded back deads if you start competing.

They’re not talking about a rounded lower back, just a rounded upper back, pulling with the bar in front may be better for some although it doesn’t feel right for me. Keeping the the shoulder blades unlocked allows more weight to be moved.

The reason Dave Tate wants shoulders behind the bar is to get you on your heels, oly style pullers keep their shoulders in front of the bar, but if you pull sumo you want your shoulders back behind the bar or it will end up being a stiff legged sumo lift and those are not fun. Conventional can go either way, but I like to drag the bar up my shins, helps keep my back tight and feel stronger that way.

As far as shoulder blades that depends on the person imo. When I pull sumo I arch my back hard and pull my blades down and together. When I pull conventional I like to keep them back as well, however it is possible to let your shoulders relax and thoracic spine round, decreasing the distance you need to move the weight to complete the lift. I don’t think Cressey was copping out, I train w/ a couple of round back pullers. They all have long arms and legs and it seems to suit their leverages. But I always start people off with rack pulls and work down to the floor.

The shoulder blade/shin scraping method even helps a total newb pull alot more weight than he really should be pulling. It gives big leverage if you’re tall. Instead of avoiding this though, I’d just lift alot less than you can and progress slowly. I think it’s the best form for a tall person out there.

Lower back rounding shuold be avoided at all costs, just drop the weight and consider it a weighted active-flexibility drill. Eventually you’ll get there.

Even a little rounding and I’ll have a tinge of sciatica for a day or two. Think shooting hip, knee, foot pain. Think tingling, think chronic lower back ache.

Not worth it. Take it slow.