T Nation

Back Hypertrophy: Deadlift vs. Rack Deadlift

Does the greater range of motion of a standard dead lift lead to more muscle gain or the use of a heavier load with less range of motion in regards to the rack dead lift?

Snactch grip deadlifts

deadlift off the floor thickens me up, whereas rack deadlifts dont do shit and i notice im not as thick after a few weeks. but im a short guy so maybe thats why. rack deadlift range of motion for me is literally 3 inches lol.

snatch grip rack pulls (w/ scap retraction at lockout) do more for my upper back

full rom deads do more for my lower back

neither one does shit for lats.

experiment, figure out what works best for you, blah blah blah.

this shit again…

try them and see how they work for you

some people get huge off of deadlifts and dl variations…
personally,they never did shit for me mass wise
when i played ball and did PL meets, i deadlifted a fair ammount more than i could now, and my back and legs were much smaller than they are now

and then some other people blow up when they include some form of heavy pulling

just try it out yourself

[quote]peteskeet wrote:
Does the greater range of motion of a standard dead lift lead to more muscle gain or the use of a heavier load with less range of motion in regards to the rack dead lift?[/quote]

Figure it out.

[quote]Anus Bleach wrote:
snatch grip rack pulls (w/ scap retraction at lockout) do more for my upper back

full rom deads do more for my lower back

[/quote]

Well said; I agree with the above post.
[note: Rack Pulls start with the bar below the knee]

In general, I’d say stick with regular full ROM.

For upper back specifically I would say the two most effective dl variations for me are the snatch grip deadlift and the rack pull from right at the knee or just above. I’m a reasonably tall fellow so rack pulls from the knee still leave a fair range of motion. That being said, you should be doing them for reps of 5 or more for hypertrophy, because IMVHO the TUT of a 3 or 1 rep set is not enough for fhypertrophy, even thpugh it’s good for strength.

As a combination–reverse band deadlifts are amazing for my back. Heavier bands for overloading the top. But be aware that heavier band tension might not necessarily drive your actual deadlfit numbers up. It does, however work great for thickness. The other thing I like are heavy good mornings, even though they are mostly lower back.

[quote]Aragorn wrote:
For upper back specifically I would say the two most effective dl variations for me are the snatch grip deadlift and the rack pull from right at the knee or just above. I’m a reasonably tall fellow so rack pulls from the knee still leave a fair range of motion. That being said, you should be doing them for reps of 5 or more for hypertrophy, because IMVHO the TUT of a 3 or 1 rep set is not enough for fhypertrophy, even thpugh it’s good for strength.

As a combination–reverse band deadlifts are amazing for my back. Heavier bands for overloading the top. But be aware that heavier band tension might not necessarily drive your actual deadlfit numbers up. It does, however work great for thickness. The other thing I like are heavy good mornings, even though they are mostly lower back.[/quote]

All of this. Throw in some reeves deads and/or wide snatch grip partials and you’re set. the reverse band deads are the shit!!

[quote]Mateus wrote:
All of this. Throw in some reeves deads and/or wide snatch grip partials and you’re set. the reverse band deads are the shit!!
[/quote]

And if you don’t have bands, but you have chains, I must say chain deadlifts are pretty sweet too.

How long is a piece of string?

Find which one works for you. I like full ROM.

[quote]CrushKillDestroy wrote:
How long is a piece of string?

.[/quote]

Twice the length from the middle to either end :wink:

Do both.

Full ROM conventional Deads.

In most cases, fuller ROM movements are superior for overall muscle or strength gain. These are more difficult to perform, of course, but pay-off well when done over time. I’d keep the abbreviated ROM work for speciality cases.