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Back Exercises Without Dumbbells?

I have a gym in my garage but i cant afford to buy dumbbells and i dont have a pull up bar either. So, im limited to the barbell. What are some good back exercises that you can use a barbell for? I know about rows but then ive heard that those are hell for the shoulder and rotator cuffs.

I deadlift but i dont think that that is a complete back workout.

Thanks.
Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Just deadlift (or do power cleans/power snatches) and do handstand pushups. These two exercises will take care of all muscles you could think of.

[quote]LCCHSathlete wrote:
I have a gym in my garage but i cant afford to buy dumbbells and i dont have a pull up bar either. So, im limited to the barbell. What are some good back exercises that you can use a barbell for? I know about rows but then ive heard that those are hell for the shoulder and rotator cuffs.

I deadlift but i dont think that that is a complete back workout.

Thanks.
Any help would be greatly appreciated.[/quote]

I think you can probably find something to do pull-ups on. Find a playground, a swing set, a tree-limb–anything really. For my back, nothing does more for it than chins. You’ll sell yourself short if you don’t do them.

Also, deadlift–try snatch grip deadlifts (they work the upper back a little more). Reverse push-ups are also an exercise to check out. Basically, row yourself to a low hanging bar (even your barbell) with your feet on the floor or a bench.

Good luck

Bent Over Barbell Rows, Bent Over 2 Arm Long Bar Rows, and Dead Lifts to name a few…

These effectively target your middle and lower back. Unfortunately, I can’t really think of an effective Lat exercise you can do with just a barbell.

Thanks for the help. Great responses, greatly appreciated

Is BB Bent-over Rows really that bad on the shoulder-joints?

With improper form and technique, any exercise can be “bad” for you.

Im sure you could pick up a pull up bar for very little money if you look around.

Thanks for the help.

I have a question about the DL.

I recently started to deadlift about 2 wks ago and today is the first day i went somewhat heavy. Is it normal to feel tight in the lower back immediately after the lift? Im not sure if it feels tight because i am working it or if i am doing something wrong.

Look for the no pullup bar, pullup.

The Home Gym:

Click on “more from this user” for more great ideas.

Don’t screw around. Make sure you are doing it right.

Some people, like myself, do feel fairly tight in the lower back after a heavy deadlift day. See if contracting the abs, while standing for example, which will rotate the hip area a bit, eases the feeling.

Personally, I’ll often do a bit of simple ab work after the deadlift, not so much to work the abs, but to help relax the back.

[quote]LCCHSathlete wrote:
Thanks for the help.

I have a question about the DL.

I recently started to deadlift about 2 wks ago and today is the first day i went somewhat heavy. Is it normal to feel tight in the lower back immediately after the lift? Im not sure if it feels tight because i am working it or if i am doing something wrong.[/quote]

Yes. After all, your lower back muscles are just like every other muscle group you train, and can get sore after an effective workout. You can, however, feel the difference between muscular soreness, which is understandable and expected, and actual pain in your lower spine itself, in which case, your technique was probably to blame.

I used to feel the latter kind of pain sometimes at first, but once I began perfecting my technique, I stopped getting that kind of pain in my lower back. Remember to always make sure you flex your core and keep it as tight and upright as possible during the dead lift motion, as this helps protect and support your spine during the exercise and keeps the majority of the stress on your core muscles muscles, and not the spine itself.

Thanks man. I read some articles and got some great ideas from him.

[quote]Velz wrote:

Yes. After all, your lower back muscles are just like every other muscle group you train, and can get sore after an effective workout. You can, however, feel the difference between muscular soreness, which is understandable and expected, and actual pain in your lower spine itself, in which case, your technique was probably to blame.

I used to feel the latter kind of pain sometimes at first, but once I began perfecting my technique, I stopped getting that kind of pain in my lower back. Remember to always make sure you flex your core and keep it as tight and upright as possible during the dead lift motion, as this helps protect and support your spine during the exercise and keeps the majority of the stress on your core muscles muscles, and not the spine itself.[/quote]

Thanks. That makes me feel better. Next time I DL ill give that a try.