T Nation

Awkward Shoulder Pain


Alright I’ll try to explain this best I can. Standing upright, if I extend my right arm out straight forward from my body and lift it up straight I don’t feel any discomfort. However, if there’s any elbow flexion it becomes painful at my shoulder joint. Like a sharp pain not a dull throbbing type.

Also, with the shoulder flexion if I then swivel my shoulder upwards it hurts even more. In my left should I can do all of this with not even minimal discomfort.

I don’t ever feel it when I lift because I guess it’s not the most natural of range of motions, but I don’t want it to get worse and start affecting even more movements. Anybody know what it could be?

HAHA! Great diagram!

I thought it came out pretty good for MS Paint :stuck_out_tongue:

Based on how you are describing your pain, you may have strained your coracobrachialis or the short head of the biceps.

[quote]Skrussian wrote:
Alright I’ll try to explain this best I can. Standing upright, if I extend my right arm out straight forward from my body and lift it up straight I don’t feel any discomfort. However, if there’s any elbow flexion it becomes painful at my shoulder joint. Like a sharp pain not a dull throbbing type.

Also, with the shoulder flexion if I then swivel my shoulder upwards it hurts even more. In my left should I can do all of this with not even minimal discomfort.

I don’t ever feel it when I lift because I guess it’s not the most natural of range of motions, but I don’t want it to get worse and start affecting even more movements. Anybody know what it could be? [/quote]

[quote]dra wrote:
Based on how you are describing your pain, you may have strained your coracobrachialis or the short head of the biceps.

[/quote]

I agree. Could have also avulsed the tendon or ruptured it.

The “fucking ridiculous” addition to the diagram is awesome. Made me laugh.

I agree with the posters above. However, I would lean more toward the bicep because coracobrachialis really has very little to do with elbow flexion (actually none). The biceps brachii flex the elbow (obviously), but also weakly assist the shoulder during flexion (as you described).

I have nothing usefull to add other than to compliment the diagram. Fucking ridiculous! :slight_smile:

You get my vote for “OP of the Year” award!!!

[quote]FutureDoc wrote:
The “fucking ridiculous” addition to the diagram is awesome. Made me laugh.

I agree with the posters above. However, I would lean more toward the bicep because coracobrachialis really has very little to do with elbow flexion (actually none). The biceps brachii flex the elbow (obviously), but also weakly assist the shoulder during flexion (as you described).[/quote]

So a strain in my bicep would cause pain in my shoulder joint? Now that I’m messing around with it, it seems to be below my anterior deltoid. It’s not the actual muscle but maybe a tendon under it or maybe it’s still the joint just the part under the ant. delt.

The origin of the short head of the biceps is the coracoid process, which is that little knob on the anterior side of scapula. So yes, pain would be felt around the lower portion of the anterior delt. Usually tendon ruptures/injuries occur a the insertion, but not always.

My advice: Rest, ice, hope that it gets better.

What if it’s more the upper part? Like almost at the top. And it’s not recent it’s been like this for a while.

Sorry, I didn’t mean what I said. I meant to say the upper (superior) part of the anterior delt. Pain would be right around the area of the distal (acromial) end of the clavicle.

Honestly, I can’t give you much advice on how to get better. Normally a tendon problem would heal via rest, some ice, and, if it were bad enough, surgery. The fact that you aren’t in excruciating pain means it probably is minor or a bit of tendonitis. You might consider seeing a physical therapist if it is interfering with your workouts/life. I could be way off.