Autism Cure-Fishoil?

http://www.nj.com/printer/printer.ssf?/base/news-11/117177694297300.xml&coll=1

For some reason the only link I could get to work is the print page one. So just cancel the print window when it comes up.

Hey, it can’t hurt to try it! Cool article.

This kind of stuff helps point out the fact that nutritional factors are involved in a lot of vital bodily processes.

I’m constantly amazed that nobody with any credentials who isn’t an online quack is willing to discuss common health ailments in terms of them being consequences of inappropriate nutrition based on modern processed and convenience foods.

Where is the simple chart saying if you don’t eat foods like “X, Y and Z” you are likely to suffer from issues related to “P, D and Q”. So, STFU and stop eating crap-in-a-box or you may end up paying the piper down the road.

Hello, human body, nutrition, exercise, cognition, endocrine roadmap and owners manual… hello? Where’s my time machine?

[quote]vroom wrote:
I’m constantly amazed that nobody with any credentials who isn’t an online quack is willing to discuss common health ailments in terms of them being consequences of inappropriate nutrition based on modern processed and convenience foods.
[/quote]

the reason that people with legitimate health creds don’t often harp about nutrition is probably because these links are primariliy inferred rather than proven. doctors don’t want to sound like the QUACKS in alternative medicine who insist that every ailment under the sun represents a nutritional problem.

[quote]belligerent wrote:
vroom wrote:
I’m constantly amazed that nobody with any credentials who isn’t an online quack is willing to discuss common health ailments in terms of them being consequences of inappropriate nutrition based on modern processed and convenience foods.

the reason that people with legitimate health creds don’t often harp about nutrition is probably because these links are primariliy inferred rather than proven. doctors don’t want to sound like the QUACKS in alternative medicine who insist that every ailment under the sun represents a nutritional problem.

[/quote]

The reason that “people” with legitimate health credentials don’t say much about nutrition is because they - usually being doctors- are not taught about nutrition in medical school and have been brain-washed into thinking that drugs will and can treat and cure every disease known to man when, in fact, that still has yet to be proven.

They’re taught pretty much only drugs and surgery because a person has to take it upon themselves to change their diet and life style- not there doctor, nor their drugs. Not to mention, no supplement could even say it “treats or cures” a disease since “only a drug can”.

I’m sure if you went into every home that had children who had severe autism, and observed their life style and diet, you’d find that they usually spend hours watching tv, slamming down 3-6 sodas a day, along with other junk food that their mom gives them because she fears that she will be deemed a monster of a parent for making her daughter exercise 30 minutes a day and eat less junk food.

The average adult ISN’T educated on nutrition, so thats when they take it upon themselves to rely on drugs and thats were their doctor usually fails to advice them to make healthy diet changes. It has nothing to do with sounding like “QUACKS in alternative medicine.”

[quote]vroom wrote:
This kind of stuff helps point out the fact that nutritional factors are involved in a lot of vital bodily processes.

I’m constantly amazed that nobody with any credentials who isn’t an online quack is willing to discuss common health ailments in terms of them being consequences of inappropriate nutrition based on modern processed and convenience foods.

Where is the simple chart saying if you don’t eat foods like “X, Y and Z” you are likely to suffer from issues related to “P, D and Q”. So, STFU and stop eating crap-in-a-box or you may end up paying the piper down the road.

Hello, human body, nutrition, exercise, cognition, endocrine roadmap and owners manual… hello? Where’s my time machine?[/quote]

You hit the nail on the head.

[quote]Cthulhu wrote:

The reason that “people” with legitimate health credentials don’t say much about nutrition is because they - usually being doctors- are not taught about nutrition in medical school and have been brain-washed into thinking that drugs will and can treat and cure every disease known to man when, in fact, that still has yet to be proven.

They’re taught pretty much only drugs and surgery because a person has to take it upon themselves to change their diet and life style- not there doctor, nor their drugs. Not to mention, no supplement could even say it “treats or cures” a disease since “only a drug can”.

I’m sure if you went into every home of a child who had severe autism, and observed their life style and diet, you’d find that they usually spend hours watching tv, slamming down 3-6 sodas a day, along with other junk food that their mom gives them because she fears that she will be deemed a monster of a parent for making her daughter exercise 30 minutes a day and eat less junk food.

The average adult ISN’T educated on nutrition, so thats when they take it upon themselves to rely on drugs and thats were their doctor usually fails to advice them to make healthy diet changes. It has nothing to do with sounding like “QUACKS in alternative medicine.”

belligerent wrote:

the reason that people with legitimate health creds don’t often harp about nutrition is probably because these links are primariliy inferred rather than proven. doctors don’t want to sound like the QUACKS in alternative medicine who insist that every ailment under the sun represents a nutritional problem.
[/quote]

Belligerent’s post is itself an excellent response to your response. If doctors are “brain washed,” it’s brainwashing into relying on scientifically and statistically demonstrated practices rather than those based on some random jackass’s supposition or the traditional medicinal practices of some tribe that still thinks female circumcision is a good idea.

Those later two sources of information are fine startingpoints for research but awful endpoints for giving actual advice to the general public.

Anyway, the rudimentary nutritional advice given by doctors now- eat less crap, eat more fruits and veggies- is already well beyond what most people are doing.

Also, you should read about what autism actually is, how it develops and the populations in which it’s most prevalent before spouting a half baked theory on it.

[quote]Cthulhu wrote:
I’m sure if you went into every home that had children who had severe autism, and observed their life style and diet, you’d find that they usually spend hours watching tv, slamming down 3-6 sodas a day, along with other junk food that their mom gives them because she fears that she will be deemed a monster of a parent for making her daughter exercise 30 minutes a day and eat less junk food. [/quote]

You… Wrote this incorrectly? I’m assuming you meant the average American home operates this way, and you said this is how households with autistic children operate instead because you were talking about autism and you got the two confused.

If that’s not the case, I can assure you that any responsible parent of an autistic child, much less “severe” autism, is all over every facet of the life of their child, including nutrition. Autistic children, obviously, have specific nutritional preferences just like they have preferences in all other things, and many have never touched ‘junk’ food or soda.

They’d never accept it if it was given to them past a certain stage in their development unless it was slowly worked into a daily routine (and I don’t know anyone that’s going to slowly work Mountain Dew into their autistic kids meal plan).

The parents of autistic children have been using fish oil supplements for quite some time, although the evidence of positive change has been sketchy. Primarily they’ve been using it because it helps with depression, and they’ve been recommended it by other parents of autistic children.

Most parents only have other parents in the autism community to rely on anyway, since federal funding has been scarce to the point of absurdity and no one has stepped up in the last 15 years to truly champion the cause.

It will be interesting to see how this pans out. One thing about the autism epidemic that never gets mentioned is that they changed the definition of what is autism back in the 90’s. That is why we are seeing this explosion of autism, because they created a new form of autism called Autism Spectrum Disorder.

If this does pan out as an objective means of testing for autism, it will be interesting to see how many of the Autism Spectrum Disorder Diagnosis hold up as actually being autism.

[quote]Cthulhu wrote:
The reason that “people” with legitimate health credentials don’t say much about nutrition is because they - usually being doctors- are not taught about nutrition in medical school and have been brain-washed into thinking that drugs will and can treat and cure every disease known to man when, in fact, that still has yet to be proven.

They’re taught pretty much only drugs and surgery because a person has to take it upon themselves to change their diet and life style- not there doctor, nor their drugs. Not to mention, no supplement could even say it “treats or cures” a disease since “only a drug can”.
[/quote]

I probably have more contempt toward doctors than anyone on this board, but the “drugs and surgery” rhethoric is just tired. Whenever medical science doesn’t support the alternative quackery worldview, just accuse doctors of being stuck on drugs and surgery. Great argument. You’ve proven nothing except how suceptible you are to the hyperbole of people like Kevin Trudeau and Gary Null.

You just made up the results of an experiment that you never even conducted. Yeah, screw doctors, CTHULU’s got the real science… good job.

[quote]Sifu wrote:
It will be interesting to see how this pans out. One thing about the autism epidemic that never gets mentioned is that they changed the definition of what is autism back in the 90’s. That is why we are seeing this explosion of autism, because they created a new form of autism called Autism Spectrum Disorder.
[/quote]

It’s not a “new form” of autism. Autism Spectrum Disorder is an UMBRELLA TERM for disorders with many similar characteristics. Some kids have more severe forms, others don’t. But they all fall under that UMBRELLA or SPECTRUM.

[quote]etaco wrote:
Cthulhu wrote:

The reason that “people” with legitimate health credentials don’t say much about nutrition is because they - usually being doctors- are not taught about nutrition in medical school and have been brain-washed into thinking that drugs will and can treat and cure every disease known to man when, in fact, that still has yet to be proven.

They’re taught pretty much only drugs and surgery because a person has to take it upon themselves to change their diet and life style- not there doctor, nor their drugs. Not to mention, no supplement could even say it “treats or cures” a disease since “only a drug can”.

I’m sure if you went into every home of a child who had severe autism, and observed their life style and diet, you’d find that they usually spend hours watching tv, slamming down 3-6 sodas a day, along with other junk food that their mom gives them because she fears that she will be deemed a monster of a parent for making her daughter exercise 30 minutes a day and eat less junk food.

The average adult ISN’T educated on nutrition, so thats when they take it upon themselves to rely on drugs and thats were their doctor usually fails to advice them to make healthy diet changes. It has nothing to do with sounding like “QUACKS in alternative medicine.”

belligerent wrote:

the reason that people with legitimate health creds don’t often harp about nutrition is probably because these links are primariliy inferred rather than proven. doctors don’t want to sound like the QUACKS in alternative medicine who insist that every ailment under the sun represents a nutritional problem.

Belligerent’s post is itself an excellent response to your response. If doctors are “brain washed,” it’s brainwashing into relying on scientifically and statistically demonstrated practices rather than those based on some random jackass’s supposition or the traditional medicinal practices of some tribe that still thinks female circumcision is a good idea.

Those later two sources of information are fine startingpoints for research but awful endpoints for giving actual advice to the general public.

Anyway, the rudimentary nutritional advice given by doctors now- eat less crap, eat more fruits and veggies- is already well beyond what most people are doing.

Also, you should read about what autism actually is, how it develops and the populations in which it’s most prevalent before spouting a half baked theory on it.[/quote]

The majority of doctors do not give much diet advice. They take the band-aid approach and prescribe drugs instead of using drugs as a last-resort to treat disease.
I had a younger cousin, who I grew up with, who suffered from severe autism. After I helped him make diet and life style changes 90% of it went away. How do I not know anything about it? Have you ever took care of a kid who had severe autism?

[quote]belligerent wrote:
Cthulhu wrote:
The reason that “people” with legitimate health credentials don’t say much about nutrition is because they - usually being doctors- are not taught about nutrition in medical school and have been brain-washed into thinking that drugs will and can treat and cure every disease known to man when, in fact, that still has yet to be proven.

They’re taught pretty much only drugs and surgery because a person has to take it upon themselves to change their diet and life style- not there doctor, nor their drugs. Not to mention, no supplement could even say it “treats or cures” a disease since “only a drug can”.

I probably have more contempt toward doctors than anyone on this board, but the “drugs and surgery” rhethoric is just tired. Whenever medical science doesn’t support the alternative quackery worldview, just accuse doctors of being stuck on drugs and surgery. Great argument. You’ve proven nothing except how suceptible you are to the hyperbole of people like Kevin Trudeau and Gary Null.

I’m sure if you went into every home that had children who had severe autism, and observed their life style and diet, you’d find that they usually spend hours watching tv, slamming down 3-6 sodas a day, along with other junk food that their mom gives them because she fears that she will be deemed a monster of a parent for making her daughter exercise 30 minutes a day and eat less junk food.

You just made up the results of an experiment that you never even conducted. Yeah, screw doctors, CTHULU’s got the real science… good job.[/quote]

When did I say to castrate all doctors? I have nothing against their “medical” science, however, some of it is greatly flawed. The same medical science that says eating cholesterol and fat makes your cholesterol levels go up? Unfortunately, you’ve missed my point. There is plenty of medical science and doctors who support this “alternative quackery” that you stated. For example, Fish oil is given as a replacement for statin drugs, with much success, for lowering your cholesterol in England-unlike here. How is there not any medical science supporting alternative medicine?

Great post dweezil, however, I would have to disagree with you. You’re right, every responsible parent does, but most parents, unfortunately, are not as responsible as they should be these days- especially since most parents work two jobs just to keep their kids stomachs full and in school.

As I said earlier, the only thing most Americans know about eating healthy is to eat their fruit and vegetables. It’s not what you do, but also what you don’t do that helps. I can assure you the most households that have three kids or more, and have both parents working, are not attending to their children’s needs nutriton-wise. The average kid drinks three sodas a day.

I was watching a program on TV a few nights ago where they built a new home for a family who were severely in debt. Four of the five children had autism, and I did notice that they were drinking quite a bit of orange sodas and eating a lot of twinkies. Once again, one soda isn’t going to be the cause of every disease known to man, but how can most kids who do have serious health conditions who are already on drugs be sure they’re doing everything they can do when they’re not exercising much or eating right?

[quote]Dweezil wrote:
Cthulhu wrote:
I’m sure if you went into every home that had children who had severe autism, and observed their life style and diet, you’d find that they usually spend hours watching tv, slamming down 3-6 sodas a day, along with other junk food that their mom gives them because she fears that she will be deemed a monster of a parent for making her daughter exercise 30 minutes a day and eat less junk food.

You… Wrote this incorrectly? I’m assuming you meant the average American home operates this way, and you said this is how households with autistic children operate instead because you were talking about autism and you got the two confused.

If that’s not the case, I can assure you that any responsible parent of an autistic child, much less “severe” autism, is all over every facet of the life of their child, including nutrition. Autistic children, obviously, have specific nutritional preferences just like they have preferences in all other things, and many have never touched ‘junk’ food or soda.

They’d never accept it if it was given to them past a certain stage in their development unless it was slowly worked into a daily routine (and I don’t know anyone that’s going to slowly work Mountain Dew into their autistic kids meal plan).

The parents of autistic children have been using fish oil supplements for quite some time, although the evidence of positive change has been sketchy. Primarily they’ve been using it because it helps with depression, and they’ve been recommended it by other parents of autistic children.

Most parents only have other parents in the autism community to rely on anyway, since federal funding has been scarce to the point of absurdity and no one has stepped up in the last 15 years to truly champion the cause.[/quote]

HIGHLY unlikely. If you speak to those in the autistic community, you’ll see that this isn’t new news. Many parents give their autistic children high doses of fish oil. It’s not a cure. But the reason they do it is that it causes real and noticeable improvement in cognitive functioning and quality of life. But it’s not a panacea and doesn’t make autistic children ‘normal.’

The more interesting thing is the implications it has for the etiology of autism which is poorly understood, and investigation into how it helps and the deficiences in autistic childrens’ metabolism of fatty acids might help researchers DEVELOP a cure. But to say that fish oil itself is a cure is like saying beta-carotene is good for eyesight, so it must be a cure for blindness.

[quote]Cthulhu wrote:
belligerent wrote:
vroom wrote:
I’m constantly amazed that nobody with any credentials who isn’t an online quack is willing to discuss common health ailments in terms of them being consequences of inappropriate nutrition based on modern processed and convenience foods.

the reason that people with legitimate health creds don’t often harp about nutrition is probably because these links are primariliy inferred rather than proven. doctors don’t want to sound like the QUACKS in alternative medicine who insist that every ailment under the sun represents a nutritional problem.

The reason that “people” with legitimate health credentials don’t say much about nutrition is because they - usually being doctors- are not taught about nutrition in medical school and have been brain-washed into thinking that drugs will and can treat and cure every disease known to man when, in fact, that still has yet to be proven.

They’re taught pretty much only drugs and surgery because a person has to take it upon themselves to change their diet and life style- not there doctor, nor their drugs. Not to mention, no supplement could even say it “treats or cures” a disease since “only a drug can”.

I’m sure if you went into every home that had children who had severe autism, and observed their life style and diet, you’d find that they usually spend hours watching tv, slamming down 3-6 sodas a day, along with other junk food that their mom gives them because she fears that she will be deemed a monster of a parent for making her daughter exercise 30 minutes a day and eat less junk food.

The average adult ISN’T educated on nutrition, so thats when they take it upon themselves to rely on drugs and thats were their doctor usually fails to advice them to make healthy diet changes. It has nothing to do with sounding like “QUACKS in alternative medicine.”[/quote]

Doctors are actually taught about nutrition in medical school At least today’s programs. Have you ever talked to anyone whose been through medical school in recent years? But it is true that the culture of this country and the medical establishment is not geared towards preventative medicine. The focus is really only on treating disease once it manifests. And it’s a damn shame.

Some general practitioners don’t even ask their patients about their diet and exercise regime. They just tell them to lose weight without any advice as to how or even just give a pill without even telling them to lose weight.

Even mainstream nutrition has come a really long way.It’s not as sophisticated as it should be, and there still are some myths. Protein is still demonized without basis. But the focus is generally on the right kinds of foods. Fruits, veggies, and whole grains. Protein, albeit not enough. And unsaturated fat is no longer seen as the enemy, [Though saturated fat is still too demonized in mainstream nutrition-it shouldn’t be gorged on but some is not bad and important for proper hormone functioning.]

But even doctors who undetsand bascially sound nutrition rarely inform their patients about it.

[quote]jsbrook wrote:
Cthulhu wrote:
belligerent wrote:
vroom wrote:
I’m constantly amazed that nobody with any credentials who isn’t an online quack is willing to discuss common health ailments in terms of them being consequences of inappropriate nutrition based on modern processed and convenience foods.

the reason that people with legitimate health creds don’t often harp about nutrition is probably because these links are primariliy inferred rather than proven. doctors don’t want to sound like the QUACKS in alternative medicine who insist that every ailment under the sun represents a nutritional problem.

The reason that “people” with legitimate health credentials don’t say much about nutrition is because they - usually being doctors- are not taught about nutrition in medical school and have been brain-washed into thinking that drugs will and can treat and cure every disease known to man when, in fact, that still has yet to be proven.

They’re taught pretty much only drugs and surgery because a person has to take it upon themselves to change their diet and life style- not there doctor, nor their drugs. Not to mention, no supplement could even say it “treats or cures” a disease since “only a drug can”.

I’m sure if you went into every home that had children who had severe autism, and observed their life style and diet, you’d find that they usually spend hours watching tv, slamming down 3-6 sodas a day, along with other junk food that their mom gives them because she fears that she will be deemed a monster of a parent for making her daughter exercise 30 minutes a day and eat less junk food.

The average adult ISN’T educated on nutrition, so thats when they take it upon themselves to rely on drugs and thats were their doctor usually fails to advice them to make healthy diet changes. It has nothing to do with sounding like “QUACKS in alternative medicine.”

Doctors are actually taught about nutrition in medical school At least today’s programs. Have you ever talked to anyone whose been through medical school in recent years? But it is true that the culture of this country and the medical establishment is not geared towards preventative medicine. The focus is really only on treating disease once it manifests. And it’s a damn shame.

Some general practitioners don’t even ask their patients about their diet and exercise regime. They just tell them to lose weight without any advice as to how or even just give a pill without even telling them to lose weight.

Even mainstream nutrition has come a really long way.It’s not as sophisticated as it should be, and there still are some myths. Protein is still demonized without basis. But the focus is generally on the right kinds of foods. Fruits, veggies, and whole grains. Protein, albeit not enough. And unsaturated fat is no longer seen as the enemy, [Though saturated fat is still too demonized in mainstream nutrition-it shouldn’t be gorged on but some is not bad and important for proper hormone functioning.]

But even doctors who undetsand bascially sound nutrition rarely inform their patients about it.[/quote]

Yes, I have. Unfortunately, unlike medicine, Nutrition isn’t mandatory in medical school. Great post though.

[quote]Cthulhu wrote:
jsbrook wrote:
Cthulhu wrote:
belligerent wrote:
vroom wrote:
I’m constantly amazed that nobody with any credentials who isn’t an online quack is willing to discuss common health ailments in terms of them being consequences of inappropriate nutrition based on modern processed and convenience foods.

the reason that people with legitimate health creds don’t often harp about nutrition is probably because these links are primariliy inferred rather than proven. doctors don’t want to sound like the QUACKS in alternative medicine who insist that every ailment under the sun represents a nutritional problem.

The reason that “people” with legitimate health credentials don’t say much about nutrition is because they - usually being doctors- are not taught about nutrition in medical school and have been brain-washed into thinking that drugs will and can treat and cure every disease known to man when, in fact, that still has yet to be proven.

They’re taught pretty much only drugs and surgery because a person has to take it upon themselves to change their diet and life style- not there doctor, nor their drugs. Not to mention, no supplement could even say it “treats or cures” a disease since “only a drug can”.

I’m sure if you went into every home that had children who had severe autism, and observed their life style and diet, you’d find that they usually spend hours watching tv, slamming down 3-6 sodas a day, along with other junk food that their mom gives them because she fears that she will be deemed a monster of a parent for making her daughter exercise 30 minutes a day and eat less junk food.

The average adult ISN’T educated on nutrition, so thats when they take it upon themselves to rely on drugs and thats were their doctor usually fails to advice them to make healthy diet changes. It has nothing to do with sounding like “QUACKS in alternative medicine.”

Doctors are actually taught about nutrition in medical school At least today’s programs. Have you ever talked to anyone whose been through medical school in recent years? But it is true that the culture of this country and the medical establishment is not geared towards preventative medicine. The focus is really only on treating disease once it manifests. And it’s a damn shame.

Some general practitioners don’t even ask their patients about their diet and exercise regime. They just tell them to lose weight without any advice as to how or even just give a pill without even telling them to lose weight.

Even mainstream nutrition has come a really long way.It’s not as sophisticated as it should be, and there still are some myths. Protein is still demonized without basis. But the focus is generally on the right kinds of foods. Fruits, veggies, and whole grains. Protein, albeit not enough. And unsaturated fat is no longer seen as the enemy, [Though saturated fat is still too demonized in mainstream nutrition-it shouldn’t be gorged on but some is not bad and important for proper hormone functioning.]

But even doctors who undetsand bascially sound nutrition rarely inform their patients about it.

Yes, I have. Unfortunately, unlike medicine, Nutrition isn’t mandatory in medical school. Great post though.
[/quote]

I guess it depends on the program. The people I know at U of M have to learn about nutrition. It’s part of the standardized curriculum. But I guess it’s not required across the board at all med schools.

[quote]Cthulhu wrote:
Great post dweezil, however, I would have to disagree with you. You’re right, every responsible parent does, but most parents, unfortunately, are not as responsible as they should be these days- especially since most parents work two jobs just to keep their kids stomachs full and in school.

As I said earlier, the only thing most Americans know about eating healthy is to eat their fruit and vegetables. It’s not what you do, but also what you don’t do that helps. I can assure you the most households that have three kids or more, and have both parents working, are not attending to their children’s needs nutriton-wise. The average kid drinks three sodas a day.

I was watching a program on TV a few nights ago where they built a new home for a family who were severely in debt. Four of the five children had autism, and I did notice that they were drinking quite a bit of orange sodas and eating a lot of twinkies. Once again, one soda isn’t going to be the cause of every disease known to man, but how can most kids who do have serious health conditions who are already on drugs be sure they’re doing everything they can do when they’re not exercising much or eating right?

Dweezil wrote:
Cthulhu wrote:
I’m sure if you went into every home that had children who had severe autism, and observed their life style and diet, you’d find that they usually spend hours watching tv, slamming down 3-6 sodas a day, along with other junk food that their mom gives them because she fears that she will be deemed a monster of a parent for making her daughter exercise 30 minutes a day and eat less junk food.

You… Wrote this incorrectly? I’m assuming you meant the average American home operates this way, and you said this is how households with autistic children operate instead because you were talking about autism and you got the two confused.

If that’s not the case, I can assure you that any responsible parent of an autistic child, much less “severe” autism, is all over every facet of the life of their child, including nutrition. Autistic children, obviously, have specific nutritional preferences just like they have preferences in all other things, and many have never touched ‘junk’ food or soda.

They’d never accept it if it was given to them past a certain stage in their development unless it was slowly worked into a daily routine (and I don’t know anyone that’s going to slowly work Mountain Dew into their autistic kids meal plan).

The parents of autistic children have been using fish oil supplements for quite some time, although the evidence of positive change has been sketchy. Primarily they’ve been using it because it helps with depression, and they’ve been recommended it by other parents of autistic children.

Most parents only have other parents in the autism community to rely on anyway, since federal funding has been scarce to the point of absurdity and no one has stepped up in the last 15 years to truly champion the cause.

[/quote]
I have to call bullshit on that.
I saw that same show and there was NOT ANY sodas on that episode. Companies have to pay big bucks for their product to be on a show like that…like Sears. Everything was very nondescript…i saw a bottle of red wine on the counter.

The one kid spilled something which looked like soy milk in the kitchen. Many Autistic kids eat a GFCF diet (Gluetin and caesin free). There is no way anyone in their right mind is giving an autistic kid sodas. I think you got your shows mixed up with the carnival of idiots on Wife Swap

[quote]vroom wrote:
This kind of stuff helps point out the fact that nutritional factors are involved in a lot of vital bodily processes.

I’m constantly amazed that nobody with any credentials who isn’t an online quack is willing to discuss common health ailments in terms of them being consequences of inappropriate nutrition based on modern processed and convenience foods.

Where is the simple chart saying if you don’t eat foods like “X, Y and Z” you are likely to suffer from issues related to “P, D and Q”. So, STFU and stop eating crap-in-a-box or you may end up paying the piper down the road.

Hello, human body, nutrition, exercise, cognition, endocrine roadmap and owners manual… hello? Where’s my time machine?[/quote]

Because, doctors make oodles and gobs of money treating sick people. If people keep themselves healthy, doctors make no money.