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Attention Runners! Shin Splints?

Can someone please describe shin splints for me?

I’ve a fairly nagging pain in my right leg, running from my knee down the outer side of my leg to my ankle…I’m guessing these are what they call shin splints, but am unsure.

[quote]Right Side Up wrote:
Can someone please describe shin splints for me?

I’ve a fairly nagging pain in my right leg, running from my knee down the outer side of my leg to my ankle…I’m guessing these are what they call shin splints, but am unsure.[/quote]

Shin splints is another one of those garbage terms; it basically describes any of a number of overuse conditions in the lower leg.

For me… Shin splits occur in these conditions for me:

(1) Super hard surface and uneven surface

(2) Pounding into the ground sprinting a lot.(harder surface)

Runs on the inside of my calf and on the top shin of my calf.(both sides of shine)

Also ankles become very tight.

Best I can describe it from my own experience

-Get Lifted

Thanks.

As far as solutions go, icing post-run/workout and quality/new sneakers seem to be the typical recommendations.

Anything else?

i get that shit on both legs when i run/sprint or do treadmill work…i’m kinda heavy and that doesn’t help…but what does help is working the muscle on the front of the lower leg, opposite the calves…i’ve forget the name of the motion…it’s either dorsal flexion or plantar flexion or something like that…get a DARD from on ebay…puts stress on the motion of raising your toes toward your face…same thing can be done with a dumbbell, but it’s not as mechanically efficient…good luck

[quote]Right Side Up wrote:
Can someone please describe shin splints for me?

I’ve a fairly nagging pain in my right leg, running from my knee down the outer side of my leg to my ankle…I’m guessing these are what they call shin splints, but am unsure.[/quote]

Again what Cressey said… but can be caused by a number of things.

AKA:
Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome

Can be a result of many things namely:
Changing terrain, new or old shoes, increased work load (distance, volume, etc).

Usually rated in three degrees… based on pain after, during + after, and constant.

Best bet is again Rest Ice Compression Elevation after every run. Do it for about 20 minutes every 2 hours.

What type of running are you doing?

Inclines?

This sounds like it is right over your peroneals.

Oh boy, shin splints…

They haunted me this track season… See i was running and stuff all fine and everything during football and wrestling season, then during track maybe i pushed a little too hard… i quickly developed a case of horrible shin splints… They said Ice every 20 minutes for 15 minutes, use heat packs before running, do calf raises with accentuated eccentrics on one foot (up on 2, down on 1). I saw a phys therapist and they gave me excercises. I did the exercises.

and lo and behold, i still have painful “shin splints”.

But don’t worry i’m probably just getting a bad case of it. If anyone else can help me/us out with this it would be great though…

Hmm i’m never able to run a good distance with road running as my ‘toe flexors’ Muscle that run at front of shin get too tight and almost seize up, although when i run on a treadmill the problem rarely occurs. The shoe issue is a problem as well, both my work shoes cause me grief with the toe flexors even when only walking to the train station (10 min walk) Though they settle down later in the day.

Anyone have this pain accompanied by bruising??

Thanks,

Top-MI-Sirloin

I’ve had terrible shin splints over the years du to bball on a hardwood floor that wasnt supported properly. Nike SHOX actually helped quite a great deal. Give those a try. The Cross-Trainer ones have the most heavy duty cushining I believe. They are really a great sneaker.

Yup, it’s a blanket term. Fortunately, it does sound like you have these rather than a more acute injury. If the pain is localized and hurts during the workout it’s more likely a more actue injury like a stress fracture. The discomfort from shinplints should also ease up after warming up. Stretch your calves out good. Make sure that you’re doing calve exercises in the gym. Strong calve muscles are important for preventing shinsplints. Walk around the house on your toes.
Also on your heels.

Do stretches for your shins. Go to do a sitting hamstring strech, but have your knee bent slightly rather than flat on the ground, pull backwards on your feet. Ice, anti-inflammatories. Do some low or non-impact cross-training. Shinplints come from too much, too fast. Hard surfaces exaserbate them. Sidewalk is the worst. Try to do some of your runs on trails, gravel, grass and softer surfaces,

Thanks for everyone’s input.

[quote]TriGWU wrote:
Usually rated in three degrees… based on pain after, during + after, and constant.[/quote]

I seem to be issues #2. Previously it hurt only in the beginning and eased off as I ran. Yesterday, though, it lasted for the duration of my run and for about an hour after.

[quote]

Best bet is again Rest Ice Compression Elevation after every run. Do it for about 20 minutes every 2 hours.

What type of running are you doing?[/quote]

Very, very light running–2 miles in about 18-20 minutes on the street. I’d like to increase the pace on this to about 15 minutes and then increase the distance…but my progress will go nowhere if I have to deal with that pain during the run. I felt like I was limping during the whole run.

What might this mean? It’s only in my right leg, if that matters.

I always learned in high school that shin splints were cased due to having too strong of a calf muscle versus the muscle on the front of the shin, thus when the calf muscle would fir hard, it could overstreth or damage the other muscle if it was not strengthened properly. We always started every track season dong lots of duck walks and other excercises for the front of the shin, I nor anyone I could remeber ever had shin splints in track?

V

Way back I used to do a lot of running (4 1/2 miles every day). I found if I let my feet pound the pavement I got shin splints.

I stopped this by getting a good pair of running shoes and by running differently. I would let my feet settle onto the pavement rather than let them fall or pound them into the pavement. I had to hold the foot up just before it touched the pavement. It took a while to get how to do it. The key is that the foot settled down instead of striked the pavement.

Stretch before and more importantly after running.

After Basketball Tournaments in High School I was frequently unable to walk right for days due to shin splints. A little Larry Scott trick from Ironman before it went soft solved them in a week and they’ve never returned. Sit on an old fashioned leg curl bench as if you were going to do extensions, so your legs are straight and toes are pointed under the foot pad, then just pull your toes up repeatedly. Walking around dorsiflexed on your heels and the DARD work too, but this movement delivered far better results for me. Good Luck.

[quote]jsbrook wrote:
Shinplints come from too much, too fast.[/quote]

I think this might have something to do with it. While my current level is rather low intensity and not much distance, I started with it from not much (meaning none) running at all.

This will be a last resort, as I have a pretty sweet and convenient route carved out at the moment.

I’m first going to up for some new sneakers soon and I’ll also ensure a more proper warm up/stretch prior to running.

In the event that the pains continue, I’ll RICE it afterward.

Once I can begin weight training again I’ll pay special attention to my calves and my tibia (?)…I think what Vegita said may be the problem in my case – calves are too strong to the point that they are out of balance…

thanks again.

Basically:
Peroneals are two muscles, Peroneus Longus and Peroneus Brevis attaching on the fibula, running on the lateral side of your lower leg passing behind/around your lateral malleoulus (ankle) and inserting on your first metatarsal and fifth metatarsal respectively. Both of which plantar flex and evert the foot.

Did you pick up this 2 mile run all at once?

[quote]TriGWU wrote:
Did you pick up this 2 mile run all at once?[/quote]

Yes, basically.

[quote]Right Side Up wrote:
TriGWU wrote:
Did you pick up this 2 mile run all at once?

Yes, basically.[/quote]

This is probably the issue.

You would be surprised… even a sudden pick up of one-mile could send someone hurtin’.

I noticed that you are training for a marathon in December?

You still have plenty of time to get your training down. You’d be surprised how fast your body can adapt to that type of distance.

Surprisingly, you might notice that the new shoulds may exacerbate your situation. Take it easy when you get the new shoes and let them really break in.

Take the first part of training slowly. From my experience, the first few mile jumps are a lot worse then the last few.

It may just seem like a trick of math but really, 1 > 2 miles is a twofold increase. Where as, 13 > 14 miles is not nearly as much. Your body’s metabolic adaptation, from my experience, tends to treat it like this as well.

I’ve always had terrible cases of these … football … track … etc…

I’ve basically eliminated them now. A few things you should try.

  1. Go to a sports shoe store and get their recomendation. Make sure they have experience, they will look at your old shoes, the wear patterns, even how you walk or run sometimes. Then recommend a shoe that will offset it. You will pay more but this helped me a LOT.

  2. Before you run, hang your toes off a step and stretch them up and down a few times (think backwards calf press). Also, trace the alphabet with your toe, only using your ankle and foot (leg remains immobile).

  3. After running, ice cube per shin (or whichever has pain) up and down motion until ice cube melts away. Doesn’t feel the best, but hey, we’re hardcore here.

  4. Another stretch that helped me. Sit on your legs so your toes are pointed backwards. (hope that makes sense) Essentially, you are standing there, kneel down, then sit back on your calves pointing your toes directly behind you. (this will probably stretch your quads too, as well as your shins).

These are the ones that has helped me the most…I have a pretty big list I could PM to you if you want, basically info I have gathered on shin splints when I was looking into them. Let me know.

One other thing, start slow. Jumping in from nothing to 2 miles is a little much. Start off slower and build up (that is how i build up to my 5Ks, running one this weekend actually, and slow and steady usually works a lot better). I could tell you how I build up too. Although it is not very ‘hardcore’, it works pretty well.

Hope this helps, I know how much shin splints hurt. :frowning: