T Nation

Atom Smasher Switched on Tomorrow

http://www.collegeotr.com/university_of_iowa/hadron_collider_atom_smasher_switched_on_tomorrow_world_may_end_11374

I can only hope that Ironman, Captain America, and the Incredible Hulk are on their way to Switzerland to stop this shit from going on. Seriously why risk this shit? Can’t they do this on the moon or something.

Seriously? I think “Dr. Manhattan” possesses far less credibility than the comic book characters you mentioned.

If not… At least I get to skip tomorrow’s boring cardio session!

[quote]EstoVir wrote:
Seriously why risk this shit? Can’t they do this on the moon or something.[/quote]

If it opens up a massive black hole, I’m pretty sure we are equally fucked if it occurs anywhere within our galaxy, let alone on the f’ing moon a stones throw away from us.

[quote]Bauer97 wrote:
EstoVir wrote:
Seriously why risk this shit? Can’t they do this on the moon or something.

If it opens up a massive black hole, I’m pretty sure we are equally fucked if it occurs anywhere within our galaxy, let alone on the f’ing moon a stones throw away from us.[/quote]

Too true. This made me laugh – thanks.

It’s been mathematically demonstrated that if our sun collapsed into a black hole, earth would orbit it and not be sucked in. Based on its current mass (and the assumption its mass didn’t magically increase), the event horizon would be well inside our distance from it.

Actually, the concern with the LHC is that it will open a small one that would essentially work toward the center of the earth, picking up mass and therefore size as it went. We’d have some time to consider the error of our ways before we all went bye-bye.

But for it to happen would require that a lot of what we know about gravity is wrong. And tiny (and the LHC product will more than qualify, assuming it even happens) black holes theoretically (Hawking) evaporate very quickly unless sufficient mass exists within its event horizon when it opens. A black hole that small has an event horizon of incredibly tiny area, and it’s not uniform – it would be a disc shape around the hole, and some angles of approach might even produce repulsion from it.

So, while it’s (incredibly remotely) possible, I don’t think I’d lose any sleep over it.

Damn. Here I was, hoping to NOT get thrust threw a black-hole into a universe where I have the most amazing superpowers and have to fight an alien god of evil to save the Earth . . .

crosses fingers

[quote]sdspeedracer wrote:
Actually, the concern with the LHC is that it will open a small one that would essentially work toward the center of the earth, picking up mass and therefore size as it went. We’d have some time to consider the error of our ways before we all went bye-bye.
[/quote]

Wow… can you imagine the chaos on Earth if that happened? What kind of ‘time’ do they estimate we’d have?

[quote]EstoVir wrote:
Seriously why risk this shit?[/quote]

yeah…why risk making the greatest scientific advance in the last 100 years? damn you progress!!!

seriously, do people actually think that this is going to cause massive black holes to form thus ending life as we know it? i don’t. CERN clearly doesn’t. besides, even if they do form, it doesn’t really matter where it’s located. if it’s on the moon, they’ll still destroy the earth.

anyway…they’re only firing up the beam tomorrow. the first particle smash isn’t going to happen for at least a year so you’ve got at least that long to live…

Well, from what I understand, even if a black hole is form and even if it is stable, it will only consume tens of atoms a year, if that.

[quote]Bauer97 wrote:
sdspeedracer wrote:
Actually, the concern with the LHC is that it will open a small one that would essentially work toward the center of the earth, picking up mass and therefore size as it went. We’d have some time to consider the error of our ways before we all went bye-bye.

Wow… can you imagine the chaos on Earth if that happened? What kind of ‘time’ do they estimate we’d have? [/quote]

I don’t know. I don’t know if there is any way to predict the behavior of the event horizon and theorize how available mass would likely cross it. You have to think that the more liquid the environment, the more likely mass would cross the horizon. But it’s so unlikely, it’s hard to imagine.

Such an event would launch a pretty massive party, though. Not to mention some of us walking down the street to take our neighbor’s Lambo Murcielago for a spin…

I don’t understand it. Science has got to stop somewhere. Endangering, oh, life as we know it generally raises a red flag for me. Yes, the chance is remote, but any chance at all is more than I’m willing to risk.

Nice knowing y’all.

Hope you guys got your crowbars purchased and at the ready.

Black Mesa all over again…

[quote]SSC wrote:
Science has got to stop somewhere. [/quote]

science will never, and should never, stop.

[quote]iamthewolf wrote:
EstoVir wrote:
Seriously why risk this shit?

yeah…why risk making the greatest scientific advance in the last 100 years? damn you progress!!!

seriously, do people actually think that this is going to cause massive black holes to form thus ending life as we know it? i don’t. CERN clearly doesn’t. besides, even if they do form, it doesn’t really matter where it’s located. if it’s on the moon, they’ll still destroy the earth.

anyway…they’re only firing up the beam tomorrow. the first particle smash isn’t going to happen for at least a year so you’ve got at least that long to live…[/quote]

According to CERN, the first collisions at 5 TeV are scheduled for 31 days from tomorrow with ramping up to 10 TeV taking approximately 6-8 weeks. The full-force collisions (15 TeV) will begin in early 2009.

DB

[quote]dollarbill44 wrote:
iamthewolf wrote:
EstoVir wrote:
Seriously why risk this shit?

yeah…why risk making the greatest scientific advance in the last 100 years? damn you progress!!!

seriously, do people actually think that this is going to cause massive black holes to form thus ending life as we know it? i don’t. CERN clearly doesn’t. besides, even if they do form, it doesn’t really matter where it’s located. if it’s on the moon, they’ll still destroy the earth.

anyway…they’re only firing up the beam tomorrow. the first particle smash isn’t going to happen for at least a year so you’ve got at least that long to live…

According to CERN, the first collisions at 5 TeV are scheduled for 31 days from tomorrow with ramping up to 10 TeV taking approximately 6-8 weeks. The full-force collisions (15 TeV) will begin in early 2009.

DB[/quote]

perhaps i misremembered what i had read. maybe it actually said “will begin early next year” or something to that effect, and i read it as “in a year.” no matter. your news is much more exciting to me. i was upset i was going to have to wait a year before the lhc did anything. now i get to hear about it in a month. yay.

[quote]SSC wrote:
I don’t understand it. Science has got to stop somewhere. Endangering, oh, life as we know it generally raises a red flag for me. Yes, the chance is remote, but any chance at all is more than I’m willing to risk.[/quote]

Ya can’t make an omelette…

I honestly believe the media is over-hyping the chances of catastrophe to draw attention to an otherwise mundane event.

Hell, space travel is routine these days, page 47 of paper (if it even gets mentioned).

Good way to justify spending billions of dollars…

[quote]iamthewolf wrote:
dollarbill44 wrote:
iamthewolf wrote:
EstoVir wrote:
Seriously why risk this shit?

yeah…why risk making the greatest scientific advance in the last 100 years? damn you progress!!!

seriously, do people actually think that this is going to cause massive black holes to form thus ending life as we know it? i don’t. CERN clearly doesn’t. besides, even if they do form, it doesn’t really matter where it’s located. if it’s on the moon, they’ll still destroy the earth.

anyway…they’re only firing up the beam tomorrow. the first particle smash isn’t going to happen for at least a year so you’ve got at least that long to live…

According to CERN, the first collisions at 5 TeV are scheduled for 31 days from tomorrow with ramping up to 10 TeV taking approximately 6-8 weeks. The full-force collisions (15 TeV) will begin in early 2009.

DB

perhaps i misremembered what i had read. maybe it actually said “will begin early next year” or something to that effect, and i read it as “in a year.” no matter. your news is much more exciting to me. i was upset i was going to have to wait a year before the lhc did anything. now i get to hear about it in a month. yay.[/quote]
I’m skeptical that anything will come of it. I’ve been running similar experiments under my house for about 9 years now. I dug out a circular tunnel that is approximately 100 meters in circumferance. Several years ago, I kidnapped a set of identical twins from the Jamaican Olympic track team. I outfitted them with special helmets with little baskets on the front, in which I place whatever items I will be colliding in that experiment.

I have them run around at full speed in opposite directions, running head-on into each other. The only time that was really exciting was when I had a small oxygen tank on one and a small acetylene tank on the other. I had to get out the cutting torch after that one, but their burns were only minor as it set off the halon extinguisher system. The twins took a little while to recover, however, since one of them was without oxygen for over 4 minutes(ironically the one who carried the oxygen tank).

DB

This may be a stupid question, but…what’s the difference between this super-collider and previous super-colliders? (Please explain in a way that will not make my head explode.)

I�??m unclear on what everyone means by �??opening�?? a black hole. The way I understand it, it�??s just a very dense portion of matter. All the other Fermi Accelerators make them when they crash atoms to make new elements (all the �??Un�?? ones at the end of the periodic table). I don�??t see the huge deal with this one? Is it just faster?

On a side note, spagettification is a cool word.