T Nation

Athletic Animals

Read about the fastest animals in the world.
http://www.athletic-animals.com/index.htm

so, I could run 65mph for 3 miles straight if i wanted to…

Article contains misinformation…no human being has ever come close to 27.89 mph…

Pit bull on a flirt pole must see!

http://www.break.com/index/superdawg.html

That was a pretty cool page. Some interesting info. Thanks.

I thought I had read something back in the day, when Michael Johnson and Donovan Bailey had their race, that they both approached 29 MPH…

[quote]belligerent wrote:
Article contains misinformation…no human being has ever come close to 27.89 mph…
[/quote]

Actually, it’s a bit low. Top speed during Powell’s 100m record was estimated to be just under 30mph. The best average speed for a 100m relay leg (100m run with a flying start) is just over 26mph, by Bob Hayes in the 1964 Olympics. I’d guess the top speed on that run was over 30mph.

[quote]larryb wrote:
belligerent wrote:
Article contains misinformation…no human being has ever come close to 27.89 mph…

Actually, it’s a bit low. Top speed during Powell’s 100m record was estimated to be just under 30mph. The best average speed for a 100m relay leg (100m run with a flying start) is just over 26mph, by Bob Hayes in the 1964 Olympics. I’d guess the top speed on that run was over 30mph.[/quote]

Whoever “estimated” that 30mph figure is a fucktard. The fastest speed ever officially recorded is 27.1 mph by Donovan Bailey in the 1996 Olympic final. No modern human will even approach 28mph. That would be well under 9.0 for 100m.

[quote]belligerent wrote:
Whoever “estimated” that 30mph figure is a fucktard. The fastest speed ever officially recorded is 27.1 mph by Donovan Bailey in the 1996 Olympic final. No modern human will even approach 28mph. That would be well under 9.0 for 100m. [/quote]

That 27.1 was during an 8.91 relay leg. Hayes’ time in 1964 was possibly 8.6, and most likely no more than 8.7. Assuming 8.6 and that the two had similar speed curves, that would mean Hayes was over 28mph.

The speed curves on good relay legs are awfully flat. Hitting top instantaneous speed is probably not useful when minimum time over 100m is the goal. These athletes are training and running to be the fastest over 100m, or whatever. If they were training and running for maximum instantaneous velocity, we would see higher speeds.

[quote]larryb wrote:
That 27.1 was during an 8.91 relay leg. Hayes’ time in 1964 was possibly 8.6, and most likely no more than 8.7. Assuming 8.6 and that the two had similar speed curves, that would mean Hayes was over 28mph.
[/quote]

You are misinformed. Bailey’s 27.1 occurred during the 100m final and this is stated in the IAAF handbook. Hays’ split was not officially timed (to my knowledge) and was certainly not measured for maximum velocity. As stated before, there is no way that any human being past or present has approached 28, no matter how brilliant a particular run may have been.

It is certainly possible that we would see greater maximum speeds if that was the nature of the competition, but they would only be slightly higher- hundreths or maybe a tenth of a meter per second.

[quote]belligerent wrote:
Article contains misinformation…no human being has ever come close to 27.89 mph…
[/quote]

You know, I agreed with you. It seemed just out of the question. Then I looked it up:

"America?s Maurice Greene is the fastest recorded running human being. During the 9.79 seconds it took him to set a world record for the 100 meters, he reached a top speed of 43.45kph/27mph.

Greene set the mark in Athens, Greece, on 16 June 1999, shaving 0.05 seconds off the previous world best, 9.84 secs, held by Canadian Donovan Bailey.

In addition to holding the world record time for the 100 meters, Greene also holds the best times for 50 meters (5.56 secs) and 60 meters (6.39 secs). He is the first athlete to hold all three records simultaneously.

Already a double World Champion in the 100 metres, in the recent Sydney Olympics, Greene took gold in both the 100 meters and the 4x100 meters relay."

http://www.speed101.com/now/fastest_0127_6.htm

You are all wrong. Asafa Powell broke Greene’s record, clocking 9.77 seconds in Athens last summer. Tim Montgomery previously broke Greene’s records as well, clocking 9.78 back in Paris in 2002. But there have been doping charges against Montgomery.

No similar charges or allegations against Powell. What is true is that no one has run at speeds approaching that stated in the article.

I guess I am wrong on one thing as well. If 9.79 is really 27 mph, then I guess 9.77 approaches 27.89 mph.

[quote]ZEB wrote:
You know, I agreed with you. It seemed just out of the question. Then I looked it up:

"America?s Maurice Greene is the fastest recorded running human being. During the 9.79 seconds it took him to set a world record for the 100 meters, he reached a top speed of 43.45kph/27mph.
[/quote]

27mph is not close to 27.89mph. That would represent an enormous difference in a 100m race.

For those who are interested, America’s Justin Gatlin has matched but not broken Powell’s record. And they are both running the 100m on July 28 at the London Grand Prix. It’s expected to be quite a showdown, with one of them possibly setting a new world record.

[quote]belligerent wrote:
ZEB wrote:
You know, I agreed with you. It seemed just out of the question. Then I looked it up:

"America?s Maurice Greene is the fastest recorded running human being. During the 9.79 seconds it took him to set a world record for the 100 meters, he reached a top speed of 43.45kph/27mph.

27mph is not close to 27.89mph. That would represent an enormous difference in a 100m race.[/quote]

Seems a little bit like nitpicking to me. Human beings have run over 27 mph. I think it’s fair to say that’s close to 27.89 mph.

[quote]jsbrook wrote:
I guess I am wrong on one thing as well. If 9.79 is really 27 mph, then I guess 9.77 approaches 27.89 mph.
[/quote]

No. An improvement of a couple hundredths of a second over 100m does not necessarily reflect a greater maximum velocity, and the world record holder is not necessarily the person with the fastest top speed. Also, a difference of 0.89mph between 27 and 28 mph respresent much, much more than 0.02 sec in a 100m race.

[quote]jsbrook wrote:
Seems a little bit like nitpicking to me. Human beings have run over 27 mph. I think it’s fair to say that’s close to 27.89 mph.[/quote]

within the context of a 100m race, 27.0 is not close to 27.89. There are light years between those numbers

[quote]jsbrook wrote:
For those who are interested, America’s Justin Gatlin has matched but not broken Powell’s record. And they are both running the 100m on July 28 at the London Grand Prix. It’s expected to be quite a showdown, with one of them possibly setting a new world record.[/quote]

Actually, Gatlin pulled out of that race. The showdown is off.

[quote]belligerent wrote:
jsbrook wrote:
I guess I am wrong on one thing as well. If 9.79 is really 27 mph, then I guess 9.77 approaches 27.89 mph.

No. An improvement of a couple hundredths of a second over 100m does not necessarily reflect a greater maximum velocity, and the world record holder is not necessarily the person with the fastest top speed. Also, a difference of 0.89mph between 27 and 28 mph respresent much, much more than 0.02 sec in a 100m race.
[/quote]

I did not say that it didn’t. I absolutely agree that it does. However, I think it amazing that a human being can run over 27 mph if only for a brief few seconds. And I consider it close enough to 27.89 to say that human beings approach it. If you want to say human beings have run 27 mph, the difference doesn’t mean much to me. Not enough to call attention to. The point is the same.