T Nation

Assistance in Determining Issue in Hip Area


#1

So I’ve been having a issue squatting. As I reach the bottom of back squat/front squat movement, I feel a stinging pain that comes from only the left side of my hip. It prevents me from going past parallel yet I still struggle to reach almost parallel. It also makes it difficult to push the hips back when back squatting.

For front squats, the stinging pain isn’t as bad but I do feel a small pain when coming out of the hole. This has happened to my right side before and it took almost 12 weeks for the pain to subside. Doctor told me I ruptured a tendon but trainers who powerlift and so on at my gym have told me it’s an IT band issue. My girlfriend has told me mobility issues. I’ve recently started doing resistance clamshells from her advice as she is a kines major.

The pain is mostly around the outside side of my left hip if that helps. However, I was just curious as to what exactly this issue is. Any ideas?


#2

Post some videos of your squat.


#3

What test did the doctor do to diagnosis a ruptured tendon, also which tendon. If your IT band is super tight, that could contribute to some pain and also decrease your mobility in getting to the bottom of the squat. Pound it with a lacrosse ball if that’s the case. Doing clams is going to strengthen your glute medius.

When you squat make sure your actively trying to push out at the knee, “spread the floor” this will turn on your glute med and help with pelvic stabilizing (avoiding the butt wink). This is all of course if you don’t have a ruptured tendon, that would be something requiring a lot more help.


#4

He just pressed the general area with his fingertips to determine where I was tender and then made me lay on my side and raise my left leg (left hip issue) and describe the pain. Nothing too extensive. Then, he diagnosed me with a ruptured tendon and told me to lay off for awhile and that I should be fine.

I will try that! “Spreading the floor” is your cue for it I’m guessing?


#5

Ive experienced a similar issue in the past and was able to clear it up through ART and a lot of foam rolling of the IT Band. However I’ve also experienced a different issue in the same hip that was caused by a pelvic tilt brought on by the amount of rotation I was doing playing baseball. Where is the pain located? Is it beneath the joint at the bottom of a squat or is it posterior to the hip joint? If it’s beneath my guess would be the IT Band is the major issue. If it’s posterior, looking into how your pelvis is positioned, specifically while moving through a squat pattern and addressing any imbalances between the glutes and hip flexors would be the next option.

This is where something like the clam would definitely come in handy. If “spreading the floor” helps the issue, it would also point more towards a pelvic positioning issue. I personally use this cue as well and found it alleviated the second issue I had a lot. Another good cue for the eccentric phase is “open the taint” (excuse my language) which is something I heard Ed Coan referencing in a supertraining seminar.


#6

[quote]Canadiathlete wrote:
Ive experienced a similar issue in the past and was able to clear it up through ART and a lot of foam rolling of the IT Band. However I’ve also experienced a different issue in the same hip that was caused by a pelvic tilt brought on by the amount of rotation I was doing playing baseball. Where is the pain located? Is it beneath the joint at the bottom of a squat or is it posterior to the hip joint? If it’s beneath my guess would be the IT Band is the major issue. If it’s posterior, looking into how your pelvis is positioned, specifically while moving through a squat pattern and addressing any imbalances between the glutes and hip flexors would be the next option.

This is where something like the clam would definitely come in handy. If “spreading the floor” helps the issue, it would also point more towards a pelvic positioning issue. I personally use this cue as well and found it alleviated the second issue I had a lot. Another good cue for the eccentric phase is “open the taint” (excuse my language) which is something I heard Ed Coan referencing in a supertraining seminar. [/quote]

Well i’m not entirely sure. The issue comes from squatting and getting into the hole. I don’t have any pain going down the leg but it is very much so concentrated beneath the hip area. Its hard to say but I think its the joint area that is affected. So would stretching out and foam rolling other muscles around the area before attempting any leg movements help?

Also, I know I can look some of this stuff up but I appreciate the help you guys are bringing to the table but can anyone tell me how a ruptured tendon is suppose to feel? I go up and down the stairs fine, I can run, box jump for height with no added weight fine, and on really good days the pain is bearable for front squats. A ruptured tendon just sounds like something that would be hard to deal with for the immediate future.


#7

A ruptured tendon would probably cause a lot more discomfort, and would more than likely be painful during any movement pattern instead of just in the hole of a squat. My best guess is that you’re experiencing some impingement in the joint. Like mentioned before do some rolling on the IT Band and quadriceps. If you can get someone to do ART on your legs that would be ideal. If after a few weeks that doesn’t help I’d check with a physiotherapist. On another note, try doing some rolling, static stretching of the anterior and lateral portions of the leg, and some glute activation drills before doing a set of light squats. If it alleviates some of the pain you’re probably moving on the right path.