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Assess Functional Upper Body Str.

I just finished reading Mike Boyles Book, “functional training for sports”

Even though I train for aesthetic purposes I got a lot out of this book. I highly recommend it.

I wanted to see where I stack up functional wise since I train mostly for hypertrophy…

Here are the 3 exercises he listed for Assessing Functional Upper Body Strength.

Males up to 225

Chin Up (shoulder with underhand)-
*National 20-25
*College 15-20
*High School 10-15

Inverted Row (feet on bench and bar set at bench press height)-
*National 20-25
*College 15-20
*High School 10-15

push ups-
*National 42
*College 35
*High School 25

He did state these are not set in stone and just a guideline…

I scored…

Chin-ups 12
Inverted row 19
Pushups 30

Not too bad considering I dont play any sports and I do not train as if I do.

How do you score? Give it a shot.

I don’t know exact numbers. With chins I tend to do them weighted for low reps, I don’t do inverted rows very often, and I haven’t maxed on push-ups in a while. I’ll guess:

chin-ups: 15-20
inverted rows: 15
push-ups: 30-40

Those are with strict form, except for rows; I’d probably come shy of touching my chest to the bar after 10 or so.

is there a different test or different numbers for males over 225?

I had Mike for a few classes in college. He was great to listen to talking about various topics. I loved that class. However, Mike is all about these functional tests. I definitely agree that they are important to evaluate functional ability but his numbers do not take into account the weight of an individual or their active ROM. Those strength to weight ratio’s are not consistent at higher weights. But I do have to say the tests are telling because I scored:

10-12-39

Haha you guys fucken suck.

What does muscle endurance have to do with functional strength? And where the fuck are the leg movements? Lunges? Single-leg squats?

Technically those aren’t ‘Upper Body’ movements really, are they?

[quote]m0dd3r wrote:
is there a different test or different numbers for males over 225?[/quote]

no, I think the numbers are just lower.

[quote]Roy wrote:
What does muscle endurance have to do with functional strength? [/quote]

He explains it in detail in the book…

[quote]Roy wrote:

And where the fuck are the leg movements? Lunges? Single-leg squats?[/quote]

I titled this topic, “Assessing Functional Upper Body Strength” as I wanted to only discuss UPPER BODY STRENGTH…

his test for lower body strength
is vertical jumping…

Height/Bodyweight have a lot to do with those numbers. I am bulking and weight around 215 now and can do 15-12-50, at 200 pounds a few months ago I could easily do 25-20-100+.

A better measure of pushing or pressing strength would be handstand pushups. When I weigh 190, I can do 20+, at 205, just 12 and at 215 only 8, even though my military press for reps has gone up by more than my bodyweight!

[quote]dswithers wrote:
Height/Bodyweight have a lot to do with those numbers. I am bulking and weight around 215 now and can do 15-12-50, at 200 pounds a few months ago I could easily do 25-20-100+.

A better measure of pushing or pressing strength would be handstand pushups. When I weigh 190, I can do 20+, at 205, just 12 and at 215 only 8, even though my military press for reps has gone up by more than my bodyweight![/quote]

those are awesome numbers at 200lbs…do you train primarily for strength or bodybuilding?

So functional = light weight for high reps?

Seems a bit silly.

[quote]unearth wrote:
So functional = light weight for high reps?

Seems a bit silly.[/quote]

yes, it is.

What if the desired “function” is to lift a heavy object over your head?

How is one supposed to know how much weight to add to the bar when performing inverted rows?

Chin-up=68
Inverted Row=50, then it became boring.
Pushup=100+

[quote]Fulmen wrote:
Chin-up=68
Inverted Row=50, then it became boring.
Pushup=100+[/quote]

That must be you in your avatar. Who needs functional strength when you can shoot fireballs?

[quote]disciplined wrote:
How is one supposed to know how much weight to add to the bar when performing inverted rows?[/quote]

I’m assuming the inverted row is an upright row with a 45-pound olympic bar?

No - its like a reverse push up, hanging below a bar, legs extended, feet either on the floor or elevated. Pull your chest to the bar, while keeping your core tight and body straight.

[quote]disciplined wrote:
disciplined wrote:
How is one supposed to know how much weight to add to the bar when performing inverted rows?

I’m assuming the inverted row is an upright row with a 45-pound olympic bar? [/quote]

not exactly. you know rows, you are face down. for inverted rows, Invert the body,suspend under a bar, the bar is fixed in its position, you pull you up to it.
another picture is doing a chin, horizontal, rigid body position.

22 chin ups
30 inverted rows
82 push-ups

5’7" 140lbs

Pullups (overhand) 19

Inverted Rows I would assume likewise

Pushups 81

5-7, 205, not national level at anything but jacking off…these guidelines don’t do it for me.