T Nation

Army Training

I’m 17 years old and i will be drafted soon to the army.
i need your help when it comes to training. the workout i had in mind look like this:

Day 1 - running 6 km
Day 2 - whole body workout
Day 3 - running 7 km
Day 4 - running 8 km +whole body workout
day 5 - rest
day 6 - whole body workout
day 7 - running 7 km

whole body workout :
pull ups (changing grips) - 4Xmax
bp - 4X15
dips - 4Xmax
shoulder press - 4X15
biceps - 3X15

the running will take plac at the beach or outside

fell free to change anything
*sorry but english is not my first language

[quote]ido777 wrote:
I’m 17 years old and i will be drafted soon to the army.
i need your help when it comes to training. the workout i had in mind look like this:

Day 1 - running 6 km
Day 2 - whole body workout
Day 3 - running 7 km
Day 4 - running 8 km +whole body workout
day 5 - rest
day 6 - whole body workout
day 7 - running 7 km

whole body workout :
pull ups (changing grips) - 4Xmax
bp - 4X15
dips - 4Xmax
shoulder press - 4X15
biceps - 3X15

the running will take plac at the beach or outside

fell free to change anything
*sorry but english is not my first language[/quote]

Try doing some squats or deads on the days you aren’t running. You won’t be able to do much but keep your strength up at least.

Plus with all that long distance running, I recommend you employ some stretching/mobility work, check out Magnificent Mobility by Eric Cressey for that.

If either suggestion interferes with the training the Army recommends, It’s up to you.

I don’t know what army you’re joining, but the American army’s physical training is mostly calisthenics and running. You should incorporate pushup variations (change the position of your hands) and situps and crunches.

We also do a bunch of completely worthless movements that have no benefit at all. Your army’s pt program might be different though.

If I had to train for basic training again, I would eliminate all weightlifting and just focus on body weight exercises and running since that’s all you’ll be doing. I would try to adapt to doing certain exercises (pushups and situps) on a daily basis well before I got to basic.

push ups, sit ups, body weight squats and running. that’s all we need here. might as well put some good stretching/flexibility work in there. don’t bother putting on too much weight. they need people that can do a lot, for a long time, with as little food as possible and are easy to transport.

tho some explosive, full body exercises shouldn’t hurt too.

[quote]sabaz wrote:
they need people that can do a lot, for a long time, with as little food as possible and are easy to transport.

[/quote]

in other words, the skinnny people that most people on this website strive not to be, lol.

sad but true. unless you can keep your strength eating oatmeal with water and a little bit of pork in it 3 times per day you should not put too much effort in it. good thing I’m there only on some weekends - being a volunteer has its own pluses. it’s like a good weekend job that way.

Are you just training for Boot Camp? If so, add push-ups and something that will help you with long hikes with 80 lbs on your back.

Now, if you are actually trying train to be a better soldier (recommended), add several different things. First, you could look up some of the things the Marines are doing to prepare for urban warfare (someone posted a link here a while back, search on it).

Add sprints, crawl on your hands and knees, drag a sled, jump over obstacles, carry odd objects over long distances, build your tolerance to extreme heat, practice combat conditioning (Also several articles on that here), in short use your imagination and do a little research to prepare for your role.

Finally, thank you very much for choosing to serve in the military (as long as it is with the US or a friendly nation).

I am hearing from a few friends in the Army that they are using “stress cards” now. So when the trainies get too stressed out they can use it and the DI has to leave them alone for a little bit.

that was a short experiment that very few companies actually participated in. but yeah, it did happen for a few.
The army times newspaper quoted a DS during the initial bus ride to basic, and it was something like…

“welcome to fort jackson, the finest training facility in the army, please exit the bus in an orderly fashion.”
what a joke, they wanted to see if low stress environments would promote learning and make a better soldier. I don’t know if the companies that did this had to repeat basic training the right way, but I sure hope so.

and the stress cards were supposed to be like mood rings, pressing your thumb against it and changing colors based on stress level.

Stress cards in a firefight would also be a great improvement. “Don’t shoot, I’m fatigued!”

[quote]Mr ian wrote:
I am hearing from a few friends in the Army that they are using “stress cards” now. So when the trainies get too stressed out they can use it and the DI has to leave them alone for a little bit.[/quote]
http://www.snopes.com/military/stress.htm

[quote]sabaz wrote:
…eating oatmeal with water and a little bit of pork in it …[/quote]
Oatmeal + pork??
That ain’t right.

[quote]subdivision wrote:
“Don’t shoot, I’m fatigued!” [/quote]

ha ha, that should work …

[quote]Matthew9v9 wrote:
sabaz wrote:
…eating oatmeal with water and a little bit of pork in it …
Oatmeal + pork??
That ain’t right.

[/quote]

it’s not America here …

Out of all you guys that gave advice, how many of you have been through basic? Forget all that crap, have fun, spend time with your family and friends, you will not have the opportunity to spend time with them like you did in the past for a while.

If you want, do some push ups, sit ups, and pull ups, but don’t stress over it. Regardless what shape you come in they are going to break you down and build you back up. I can’t tell you for sure about soft skill basic, but on the infantry OSUT side that is the way it works, they will put you in the shape you will need to be in, trust me.

The mental part is the key to basic, the physical will come. I drank beer every night for 2 months on the delayed entry program and quit working out, you know why, because I knew they would get me back in shape, and they did.

You being underage, I wouldn’t recommend it, but have some fun, enjoy your freedom while you got it and DON’T GET IN TROUBLE WITH THE LAW from now til then. Enjoy life for fucks sake, you may be in Iraq in 5 months. There is nothing that can prepare you for the change you are going to make in your life, except a drill sargeant and trust me, he will, at least if you go to Benning he will.

[quote]Matthew9v9 wrote:
Mr ian wrote:
I am hearing from a few friends in the Army that they are using “stress cards” now. So when the trainies get too stressed out they can use it and the DI has to leave them alone for a little bit.
http://www.snopes.com/military/stress.htm

[/quote]

that page is copyrighted 2003, I read about stress free basic in the army times, a newspaper published by the army itself, this was in 2006.

I’m trying to be a fight pilot for the israel Army

Israel are allies with America and such, right?

it’s a bit different for the pilots if I’m not mistaken. but still some tough preparation.

[quote]ido777 wrote:
I’m 17 years old and i will be drafted soon to the army.
i need your help when it comes to training. the workout i had in mind look like this:

Day 1 - running 6 km
Day 2 - whole body workout
Day 3 - running 7 km
Day 4 - running 8 km +whole body workout
day 5 - rest
day 6 - whole body workout
day 7 - running 7 km

whole body workout :
pull ups (changing grips) - 4Xmax
bp - 4X15
dips - 4Xmax
shoulder press - 4X15
biceps - 3X15

the running will take plac at the beach or outside

fell free to change anything
*sorry but english is not my first language[/quote]

well, as a fighter piolt, you’re gonna want to stay lean, and not get too big. i know they disqualify guys for that…

i’ve been in the Army for almost 14 years (Infantry squad leader), and feel that having a good combination of strngth and endurance is key. weighing more for vanity’s sake is not…

i’d suggest focusing on pushups, pullups, situps, deadlifts (5x5) and then alternating with running (long distance AND sprints).

i can PM you a rotuine i used to prep for Ranger school, too, but i think that these are good guidlines.

i do agree with enjoying life before you leave, too. they’ll get you in the shape you need to be-just develop a broad base to work from.

also, if you do a search on Stew Smith, he has some decent military workouts…

good luck!