T Nation

Are We Trading Brains for Brawn?

My fiance’ is about to graduate from Baylor and brought to my attention a fact she thinks is quite hillarious due to my supllementing AAS.

Apparently she learned in her nuerology class that taking AAS that increase testosterone lowers your IQ. FUCKIN CRAZY, right!? According to her professor the testosterone is makin us dumber.

Im not sure how quickly the rate of stupidty to muscle goes… but i do know that i have read many very inteligent posts here from people who seem quite bright. What do yall think? Are we getting dumber??

“The greater your weight, the lower your IQ, say scientists.”

“It is bad for your blood pressure, knocks years off your life and is a strain on your heart. Now scientists have discovered that gaining weight lowers your intelligence.”

Looks like you lose either way then.

I’d rather go for lean, muscular, horny and dumb, than fat and dumb.

haha, i agree. besides… ive been with alot of dumb chicks. not big ones, mind you… but some that werent too bright. and they were the hottest and better in bed than the smart ones. IMO.

As a recent graduate, and before I went the route I went, I wasted many years in college taking sports medicine concentrated classes.

NONE of what the college texts made any sense to me, as it was normally outdated, old information, just regurgitated in a new text book every semester which as you know, are EXPENSIVE! The info seemed, uh, stupid. For instance, my PhD. A and P instructor received his degree in like, 1968. Two of us in the class were BBer type guys with way more mass than the average college kid. The teach said he had an intern in the 70’s that died from amino acid tablets! This was 1999! WTF? This guy had ALL my respect up to that point, and when I threw the bullshit flag, and said something else had to be involved, he was adament it was too much protein!

Keep in mind this was at the height of the Adkins’ Diet, but right then I knew that common sense is more valuable than a degree in a personal sense, but as far as making money, you almost need a degree! So, I held my tongue, and went home and downed some Phosphagen HP and a Myoplex shake! Stupid me…

[quote]daveybaby wrote:
My fiance’ is about to graduate from Baylor and brought to my attention a fact she thinks is quite hillarious due to my supllementing AAS.

Apparently she learned in her nuerology class that taking AAS that increase testosterone lowers your IQ. FUCKIN CRAZY, right!? According to her professor the testosterone is makin us dumber.

Im not sure how quickly the rate of stupidty to muscle goes… but i do know that i have read many very inteligent posts here from people who seem quite bright. What do yall think? Are we getting dumber??[/quote]

You misspelled hilarious, supplementing, neurology, stupidity, and intelligent…

Sounds like she may be right… Lunkhead! 8^)

[quote]daveybaby wrote:
My fiance’ is about to graduate from Baylor and brought to my attention a fact she thinks is quite hillarious due to my supllementing AAS.

Apparently she learned in her nuerology class that taking AAS that increase testosterone lowers your IQ. FUCKIN CRAZY, right!? According to her professor the testosterone is makin us dumber.

Im not sure how quickly the rate of stupidty to muscle goes… but i do know that i have read many very inteligent posts here from people who seem quite bright. What do yall think? Are we getting dumber??[/quote]

In tests that match up intelligence to occupation, those that typically rate the highest in Testosterone are lawyers, physicians (mainly surgeons) and figher pilots, none of which are typically associated with low intelligence.

[quote]TC wrote:
daveybaby wrote:
My fiance’ is about to graduate from Baylor and brought to my attention a fact she thinks is quite hillarious due to my supllementing AAS.

Apparently she learned in her nuerology class that taking AAS that increase testosterone lowers your IQ. FUCKIN CRAZY, right!? According to her professor the testosterone is makin us dumber.

Im not sure how quickly the rate of stupidty to muscle goes… but i do know that i have read many very inteligent posts here from people who seem quite bright. What do yall think? Are we getting dumber??

In tests that match up intelligence to occupation, those that typically rate the highest in Testosterone are lawyers, physicians (mainly surgeons) and figher pilots, none of which are typically associated with low intelligence.

[/quote]

This is why I LOVE THIS SITE! TC, you came through again with some good words of wisdom… Question though, Is the reason most of these guys are fat and bald due to the DHT and Estrogen conversions from the life long elevated T levels?!

[quote]You misspelled hilarious, supplementing, neurology, stupidity, and intelligent…

Sounds like she may be right… Lunkhead! 8^)

[/quote]

hahahaha… guess so. but, i swear that stupidity was spelled spudity. i just cant see that ‘i’ fitting in. haha…

[quote]This is why I LOVE THIS SITE! TC, you came through again with some good words of wisdom… Question though, Is the reason most of these guys are fat and bald due to the DHT and Estrogen conversions from the life long elevated T levels?!
[/quote]

if that was the case, then… they say baldness comes from your mothers father. so if your father is fat and bald, then can you associate yourself with someone who has naturaly high T levels??

I personally think that it is IMPERATIVE to have the traits associated with high levels of test to reach the upper parts of any organization.

When it boils down to it, you could have graduated with honors from Harvard, but if your a passive aggressive, “small” man (i dont mean physical size), you will never make it to the top.

You will be doomed to a life of servitude to somebody who might not be as smart as you, but has the power to impose his will on others. And a strong handshake doesnt hurt either.

[quote]daveybaby wrote:
This is why I LOVE THIS SITE! TC, you came through again with some good words of wisdom… Question though, Is the reason most of these guys are fat and bald due to the DHT and Estrogen conversions from the life long elevated T levels?!

if that was the case, then… they say baldness comes from your mothers father. so if your father is fat and bald, then can you associate yourself with someone who has naturaly high T levels??[/quote]

I guess I’m safe then… My mom’s dad is 77 and has a thick ass head of hair! I’ve heard ur theory, but I don’t think they figured 'roids into the equation!

[quote]Chris (NZ) wrote:

“The greater your weight, the lower your IQ, say scientists.”

[/quote]

Because this kind of blanket correlation makes TOTAL sense. Especially because we all know that there are no OBESE people in the world to skew the correlation. And particularly because those obese people do not in fact have lower IQs correlated with that.

Right. See my next post.


1: Eat Weight Disord. 2006 Sep;11(3):126-32.

Decision-making in obesity: a study using the Gambling Task.

Pignatti R, Bertella L, Albani G, Mauro A, Molinari E, Semenza C.

Laboratory of Psychology, Istituto Auxologico Italiano IRCCS, Piancavallo (VB),
Italy. pignatti@virgilio.it

The present study addresses the issue of whether a “decision-making disorder”
could account for the behavioral problems of severely obese patients (BMI score

  1. who are not classified by traditional psychiatric Eating Disorder tests.
    The neuropsychological test employed, the Gambling Task (GT), is not directly
    related to the food domain, but it is sensitive to failure in making long-term
    advantageous choices. A comparison was made of 20 obese subjects (OS) and 20
    normal-weight subjects (NWS) matched in age, education and IQ. The subjects’
    personalities and food behavior were assessed from psychological questionnaires,
    and then the Gambling Task was administered. The number of “good” choices made
    by the two groups during GT performance differed significantly, and the OS did
    not learn to maximize advantageous choices like the NWS did. OS behavior could
    be consistent with a prefrontal cortex defect that implies difficulties in
    inhibition of excessive food intake.

2: Zhonghua Yu Fang Yi Xue Za Zhi. 1996 Mar;30(2):77-9.

[Harmfulness of obesity in children to their health]

[Article in Chinese]

Zhang H, Li Y.

Department of Child and Adolescent Health, Shandong Medical University, Ji’nan.

With the increase of obese children, harmfulness of obesity to their health was
studied to lay a basis for formulating corresponding intervention measures.
Blood sugar, intelligent quotient (IQ), thyroid function, cardiac and pulmonary
function, and index of gonad development were determined in 150 obese children
and 150 normal healthy children. Results showed baseline secretion of insulin
and C-polypeptide in obese children were significantly higher than that in
controls, and thyroid function, total IQ, speech IQ and operation IQ all were
relatively lower, cardiac and pulmonary function was significantly lower, and
gonad development and maturity took place earlier in the former than in those in
the latter. It indicated that there were a lot of risk factors harmful to their
health in obese children.


3: Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1995 May;19(5):355-7.

A study of intelligence and personality in children with simple obesity.

Li X.

Department of Hygiene of Children and Adolescents, Nanjing Medical University,
Jiangsu, PRC.

The objective of this study was to investigate differences in measures of
intelligence and personality between obese and normal-weight children. The
Wechsler Intelligence Scale (IQ) for Children (revised) and the Eysenck
Personality Questionnaire (EPQ) were administered to 102 children with simple
obesity and their controls in a case-controlled design. The mean age of the
children was 9.8 years and they all attended primary school in Nanjing, PRC. It
was found that children in the severe obesity category (> 50% overweight) had a
significantly lower performance IQ score than the controls, and a significantly
higher EPQ psychoticism score. These differences were not observed in children
with milder degrees of obesity.


4: Int J Obes (Lond). 2006 Sep;30(9):1422-32. Epub 2006 Mar 7.

Childhood IQ in relation to obesity and weight gain in adult life: the National
Child Development (1958) Study.

Chandola T, Deary IJ, Blane D, Batty GD.

Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London,
UK.

OBJECTIVE: To examine the relation of childhood intelligence (IQ) test results
with obesity in middle age and weight gain across the life course. METHODS: We
analysed data from the National Child Development (1958) Study, a prospective
cohort study of 17 414 births to parents residing in Great Britain in the late
1950s. Childhood IQ was measured at age 11 years and body mass index (BMI), an
indicator of adiposity, was assessed at 16, 23, 33 and 42 years of age. Logistic
regression (in which BMI was categorised into obese and non-obese) and
structural equation growth curve models (in which BMI was retained as a
continuous variable) were used to estimate the relation between childhood IQ and
adult obesity, and childhood IQ and weight gain, respectively. RESULTS: In
unadjusted analyses, lower childhood IQ scores were associated with an increased
prevalence of adult obesity at age 42 years. This relation was somewhat stronger
in women (OR(per SD decrease in IQ score) [95% CI]: 1.38 [1.26, 1.50]) than men
(1.26 [1.15, 1.38]). This association remains statistically significant after
adjusting for childhood characteristics, including socio-economic factors, but
was heavily attenuated following control for adult characteristics, particularly
education (women: 1.11 [0.99, 1.25]; men: 1.10 [0.98, 1.23]). When weight gain
between age 16 and 42 years was the outcome of interest, structural equation
modelling revealed that education and dietary characteristics in adult life
mediated the association with childhood IQ. CONCLUSIONS: A lower IQ score in
childhood is associated with obesity and weight gain in adulthood. In the
present study, this relation appears to be largely mediated via educational
attainment and the adoption of healthy diets in later life.