T Nation

Apologies for Being Misinformed

OK, so I questioned how good the majority of BJJ players s&c was, then during second hour of rolling projectile vomited into the toilet.

I pooh-poohed 25 rep range for jiu jitsu guys, then found out the s&c coach recommended that for jiu jitsu specific conditioning.

I argued against tonnes of peoples better knowledge that s&c was really important, then was informed on the mats that rolling is the only thing that really makes you better at rolling.

So yeah, this is me saying sorry for douching up the forums lol.

I didnt think you were douching up the forum dude, it’s just that it’s a discussion/thread that’s happened here A LOT

S&C always has a place for any athlete in any sport (whether it’s to improve strength, conditioning, or most importantly IMO - to prehab/rehab any muscle weakness/imbalances/injuries), the important thing is to always remember it’s secondary. Just remember, prioritize your training for your sport, not for the weight room.

Kudos to you bro. I know how you feel. We both found out the hard way. At least you didn’t gas in competition, on video, grappling a well known MMA fighter you outweigh by 10kg.

Notice the advanced tactic of putting yourself in an omoplata to get a breather.

And I never cut out road work again.

[quote]rundymc wrote:
Kudos to you bro. I know how you feel. We both found out the hard way. At least you didn’t gas in competition, on video, grappling a well known MMA fighter you outweigh by 10kg.

Notice the advanced tactic of putting yourself in an omoplata to get a breather.

And I never cut out road work again.[/quote]

Yeah that was the problem I think, I have not ran for six months and have been out of BJJ a couple months due to recurring knee problems, I now have zero stamina, but I was happy with my ability to push through the pain, was sick but carried on rolling for the second hour.

I actually disagree with 25 reps for BJJ players. What I mean is, for some it may help them or at least they think it helps, but I don’t think it’s cut and dried. I have always lifted heavier. I’ve also been doing BJJ for over 10 years. I lift because I love lifting and to get stronger. I don’t worry about what it may or may not do for BJJ. As far as getting in shape to do BJJ: I just try to do more BJJ. IMO, a better way to condition yourself for grappling, outside of actually grappling, is to do things like sledgehammer work, sandbags, the whole “GPP” thing. And even that won’t be as effective as doing BJJ drills and sparring.

“They” say that having bigger muscles hurts you because they fatigue quicker but, if you are doing BJJ correctly you shouldn’t be overworking your muscles in the first place. In other words: if your muscles feel tired while rolling (early on, not at the end of 2 hours) it’s not the fault of how you lift or the lack of lifting but rather it’s because of doing BJJ incorrectly.

You may see BJJers doing 25 reps or more but believe me, there are also those who train heavier. Those who train to get bigger and/or stronger and not just better conditioned.

Live and learn.

[quote]zecarlo wrote:
I actually disagree with 25 reps for BJJ players. What I mean is, for some it may help them or at least they think it helps, but I don’t think it’s cut and dried. I have always lifted heavier. I’ve also been doing BJJ for over 10 years. I lift because I love lifting and to get stronger. I don’t worry about what it may or may not do for BJJ. As far as getting in shape to do BJJ: I just try to do more BJJ. IMO, a better way to condition yourself for grappling, outside of actually grappling, is to do things like sledgehammer work, sandbags, the whole “GPP” thing. And even that won’t be as effective as doing BJJ drills and sparring.

“They” say that having bigger muscles hurts you because they fatigue quicker but, if you are doing BJJ correctly you shouldn’t be overworking your muscles in the first place. In other words: if your muscles feel tired while rolling (early on, not at the end of 2 hours) it’s not the fault of how you lift or the lack of lifting but rather it’s because of doing BJJ incorrectly.

You may see BJJers doing 25 reps or more but believe me, there are also those who train heavier. Those who train to get bigger and/or stronger and not just better conditioned. [/quote]

Nah, the issue the OP was referring to didn’t have much to do with the actual rep ranges. It was more him questioning the “sport-oriented” methods he witnessed because they don’t really follow the usual dogma being preached in S&C watering holes.

Anyway, good point on the whole efficiency thing. I’ve had matches that downright killed me, against skinny guys with better technique, and matches where I’d barely breath heavy, against 100kg dudes with inferior technique. Though granted, I think if you want to push the pace, the extra muscle will probably hurt.

Live and learn.

[quote]zecarlo wrote:
I actually disagree with 25 reps for BJJ players. What I mean is, for some it may help them or at least they think it helps, but I don’t think it’s cut and dried. I have always lifted heavier. I’ve also been doing BJJ for over 10 years. I lift because I love lifting and to get stronger. I don’t worry about what it may or may not do for BJJ. As far as getting in shape to do BJJ: I just try to do more BJJ. IMO, a better way to condition yourself for grappling, outside of actually grappling, is to do things like sledgehammer work, sandbags, the whole “GPP” thing. And even that won’t be as effective as doing BJJ drills and sparring.

“They” say that having bigger muscles hurts you because they fatigue quicker but, if you are doing BJJ correctly you shouldn’t be overworking your muscles in the first place. In other words: if your muscles feel tired while rolling (early on, not at the end of 2 hours) it’s not the fault of how you lift or the lack of lifting but rather it’s because of doing BJJ incorrectly.

You may see BJJers doing 25 reps or more but believe me, there are also those who train heavier. Those who train to get bigger and/or stronger and not just better conditioned. [/quote]