T Nation

Anyone Strict Press BW (or More)?

Topic as above.

Let’s share some routines/tips etc…

A BW strict OHP is one of my main lifting goals.

I don’t do the barbell version as I have a bad wrist,so I do it with a 12’ log.

Best lift was 85kg at 93kg BW.

Yes. During my (short lived) olympic lifting days I strict pressed 150 lbs. at a bodyweight of 147. Routine was lots of back squats, front squats, cleans, and strict presses.

Every time I got close, my body weight went up. Not sure what I can strict press right now.

I’m getting closer. 15 more pounds on my strict press and I’m there.

[quote]Donut62 wrote:
I’m getting closer. 15 more pounds on my strict press and I’m there.[/quote]

By then you will have added 5 or 10lb of weight haha.

A strict BW press is cool. It too is a goal of mine.

Lets see some videos!

[quote]elano wrote:

By then you will have added 5 or 10lb of weight haha.

[/quote]

buries head in sand

here is me in my peak days training. This is 1.6 times bodyweight

good one axelrod.

This is me at a bodyweight of 205

After you hit body weight…practice the tuck, rolling out (with arms still bent) and press up into a handstand. Doing this in your warm up will allow you to always maintain at least a body weight press.

Oh yeah, for routine, I was following a westside template at the time, but Pavel’s 3-5 with overhead press as a movement helped as well.

Yes, although I rarely do standing barbell military press and don’t consider myself that good at them. Friend of mine just did 250x3 at 240 bw.

BTW some people define a “strict” military press as heels together along with no leg drive.

I’ve done 80kg @ about 84kgs bodyweight.

I’ll give 85kg a crack before the year’s end, I’m a powerlifter so I compete in a weight class, my weight isn’t going anywhere :smiley:

[quote]Tim Henriques wrote:
Yes, although I rarely do standing barbell military press and don’t consider myself that good at them. Friend of mine just did 250x3 at 240 bw.

BTW some people define a “strict” military press as heels together along with no leg drive.[/quote]

I didn’t see this topic as being specifically about the military press, but just the strict press itself.

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:
Tim Henriques wrote:
Yes, although I rarely do standing barbell military press and don’t consider myself that good at them. Friend of mine just did 250x3 at 240 bw.

BTW some people define a “strict” military press as heels together along with no leg drive.

I didn’t see this topic as being specifically about the military press, but just the strict press itself.[/quote]

My point was some people would say it is not strict if you don’t keep your heels together. I see a press as used in this definition and a military press (or a shoulder press) as the same thing. In the videos shown nobody had their heels together.

The olympic press came to accommodate virtually any backbend,and some leg drive (possibly depending on judges’ politics).
It was supposed to be much more strict in the early days. But I think that would make a good measure; no visible knee bending, incline optional.

[quote]with the end of the second world war, new countries applied for membership into the International Weightlifting Federation (IWF). The most influential of these countries was the Russian Soviet Union (USSR). Voted to be accepted into the IWF by just one vote in 1946, the USSR soon demonstrated a determination to excel and lead in the sport of Olympic lifting.

Thus began an assault on world weightlifting records that had not been matched previously. It was also evident, by the rate that the press world records were exceeding snatch and clean and jerk records combined, that many presses were not being performed according to the way the press rules were written! The rules at that time did not allow for any back bend when performing a press.

However, the Soviet lifters were encouraged by their officials and coaches to ignore this rule, and soon a new form of Press was introduced that became to be known as the “Russian style” Olympic press. This double lay back or back bending style soon crept into international competitions, and with uninformed crowds, thinking such lifts were good, many referees got intimidated into passing bad lifts.

Now rather than standing up to the USSR and saying, “NO, THIS FORM OF PRESS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED”, the IWF capitulated and in 1956 changed the wording of the press rules! The new rule had the words “without exaggerated back bend”. Thus any interpretation by a referee was an “individual judgment call”. What may have been an “exaggerated back bend” to one referee could be perfectly acceptable to another.
[/quote] jva.ontariostrongman.ca/PRESS.htm

[quote]Alffi wrote:
The olympic press came to accommodate virtually any backbend,and some leg drive (possibly depending on judges’ politics).
It was supposed to be much more strict in the early days. But I think that would make a good measure; no visible knee bending, incline optional.[/quote]

Exactly, that’s how I interpret it. I figure the press and the military press are different moves.

IMO, heels together might as well be saying “put your feet on the bench when you’re bench pressing”

Not an optimal (or even normal) way to stand.

Lets define strict OHP as NO leg drive,position of heels does not matter.

For me,I put my stronger feet slightly forward.

According to Keith Wassung,

“To place yourself in the strongest standing position, you should place one foot approximately 3-4 inches in front of the other in a staggered stance. This will place you in a much stronger stance permitting more work to be performed. Boxers, martial artists, baseball players and track and field athletes also use the staggered stance. If you ever see pictures of past Olympic lifters such as Vasily Alexeev or Paul Anderson, you will notice that their feet are staggered when elevating weights overhead.”