T Nation

Anyone Had Vasectomy Issues

My lady and I are shopping around for more permanent birth control options down the road, and one of the options I’m looking into is having a vasectomy after having a number of sperm samples stored for later use. I took a look at cost, and it seems that there’s ~20% fertility rate when it’s done right with young healthy people.

Just wondering if anyone has had any personal experience in this arena or maybe vasectomy reversals. I’m going to chat with a facility in Indy when I get a chance for a professional opinion too, but what individuals have experienced would be great to hear as well. If you’re not comfortable sharing in the open forums, I’d appreciate any PM’s too.

Thanks,

Dan

There has been a documented link between vasectomies and autoimmune disorders. It’s not 100% proven but it is something worth investigating.

I had mine done two years ago and have not had one single side affect from it. I was out of the gym one week…started just doing a light maintainence workout after that…took about three weeks to get all the way back to full strength. But other than that, it was an easy thing to deal with.

Had mine several years ago. Outpatient procedure under a local anesthetic. Mine required a little extra cutting. Other than the 2 days of REAL SORENESS. Day one was bad pain. Like someone cracking your balls w/ a 5lb sledge hammer.

After that no worries. Literally.

First off, you should not go into a vasectomy with any ideas of having it reversed. It should be considered a permanent procedure. This is not to say it can’t be reversed, but reversals are unsuccessful for the most part. If you’re unsure and are thinking “hey, I can always get it reversed later”, you should not have the v.

My own experience is atypical. I got snipped two years ago and it was not a great time for me. The anestetic did not really work and I felt 98% of the procedure, with the exception being the initial sack slice. I felt the snips, the tugs, the cauderization, the stitches, etc. It was highly unpleasant and I nearly passed out a couple of times. But hey, it builds character, right?

The aftermath wasn’t all that bad, I was in bed for the rest of the day and was able to move around gingerly for the next 2 days. I had pretty much full mobility on day 3, but I was still moving a little slow. I “tested” myself after 5 days - no problem. However, I still had tenderness for several months afterward and I still feel a twinge every now and then if I brush my nuts wrong.

Given how much I hate condoms and bc pills screwed up my wife’s body, it was definitely worth it. If I had to do it over again, I would go under a general anesthesia rather than local.

DB

Check out Shugs blog, he just had the snip and wrote a good article about it. After my wife and I have our kid (Eventualy) I’m going to go for it as well.

la’
Redsol1

Five years ago. No serious issues as long as I get off about every day or two. If it’s much longer than that, there is a weird, unpleasant situation that comes along with the great, toe curling sensations.

[quote]doogie wrote:
Five years ago. No serious issues as long as I get off about every day or two. If it’s much longer than that, there is a weird, unpleasant situation that comes along with the great, toe curling sensations.[/quote]

Damn, that’s a great story you’ve designed there that a lot of guys should be using. (j/k)

I got cut 9 yrs ago after watching 4 cesaerians. I did desk duty the next day and was good to go from then only with a horrible fear of being kicked in the nuts by anyone I passed or spoke with. No complications, only a lower fluid out-put but I’ve found that this is actually desireable. I’m in my early forties now and looking back I had no choice, birth control pills didn’t work for her, but I don’t think I would do it again and I certainly would not if I were in my 20’s. Good luck.

I had the snip 22 years ago as a personal treat for my 30th birthday :slight_smile:
The operation itself was easy & all I suffered was a small bruise on one side of my scrotum.
Long term it has caused a few problems, mainly from inflammation of the epydidimus (the curly tube from the balls). This is a common problem for long term vasectomies so be prepared for it.

Two years ago I has a lump on my right ball & arranged a quick scan. It was a sperm granuloma which disappeared naturally but it gave me a shock. I was advised that granulomas are also a long-term problem but less common.

The comment about a link between vasectomies and autoimmune diseases is interesting. Nine years ago I was clinically diagnosed with multiple sclerosis after an MRI scan. I have conquered the illness thankfully. If I had known the actual side-effects 30 years ago I don’t honestly think I would have had it done but it’s always easy looking back with hindsight.
Good luck with yours :slight_smile:

[quote]SBB wrote:
doogie wrote:
Five years ago. No serious issues as long as I get off about every day or two. If it’s much longer than that, there is a weird, unpleasant situation that comes along with the great, toe curling sensations.

Damn, that’s a great story you’ve designed there that a lot of guys should be using. (j/k)

[/quote]

Oh, she doesn’t participate in half of them. They’re self-inflicted.

I have experienced alot of these similar symptoms.
doogie wasn’t joking about not letting any back pressure build. Nothing like that good feeling quickly followed like a kick in the nuts. I also have permanetly enflammed epidimis on one gonad. Super sensitive.

I don’t know if it could be related but 6 yrs later. hypogonadal, vitaligo just showed up(an auto imune disease)

Yeah the auto-immune/vasectomy link isn’t solid but there are numerous reports of men needing to go on T replacement years after the snip. At this point I think it’s more conjecture and anecdotal. None the less it should be on people’s radar. If any men notice something is “off” after the procedure I think a thorough physical would be a good idea.

Of course, there are many men that are perfectly fine afterwards, so it’s not a matter of every vasectomy procedure leading to autoimmune problems.

I’ve read about a vasectomy clip that they put on instead of cutting it, it works well, and it may be easier to reverse.

[quote]Finalyear wrote:
I’ve read about a vasectomy clip that they put on instead of cutting it, it works well, and it may be easier to reverse.[/quote]

I have the clips. I don’t know about reversing it, though. Don’t ever care to.

I’ve noticed that the bar skanks I bang don’t mind as much if I dump loads on them. I just tell them I’ve been neutered and all kinds of fun stuff happens.

I had mine back in January of '78. I already had 3 kids, all in diapers. There has not been even the slightest physical problem from my end. Long term monogamy, now that’s 'nother can of worms.

answer: a great divorce and a girlfriend of over 4 years who thinks and acts and swears by the fact that I am “The world’s most wonderful man” Also I’d like to thank T-Mag for about 8 years of the “BEST” in terms of information, motovation, utilization, transformation and transsubstantiation of the “Whirlpool of Crap” into the best site you’d ever want to have a desktop icon for. and to CT, it was great to see you out a Venice beach.

Thanks for all the feedback guys. Sounds like a little bit of a mixed bag when it comes to side effects, I’ll take a deeper look into those and see if it has anything to do with the surgeon’s skill or any existing issues in the literature.

Bri, the autoimmune thing is definately interesting. I know you mentioned it’s mostly conjecture at this point, but do you know of any formal research being done that I could look into?

Have a good one,

Dan

Had mine done about ten years ago, after our fourth kid was born. No side effects at all. No drop in t levels, no issues at all.

[quote]buffalokilla wrote:
Thanks for all the feedback guys. Sounds like a little bit of a mixed bag when it comes to side effects, I’ll take a deeper look into those and see if it has anything to do with the surgeon’s skill or any existing issues in the literature.

Bri, the autoimmune thing is definately interesting. I know you mentioned it’s mostly conjecture at this point, but do you know of any formal research being done that I could look into?

Have a good one,

Dan[/quote]

I found these on pubmed. They show there may be a link between autoimmune diseases and vasectomies.

There’s a bunch of info on google as well if you use the search criterion “vasectomy” and “autoimmune”.

1: Br J Gen Pract. 1997 Jun;47(419):381-6.

Is vasectomy harmful to health?McDonald SW.
University of Glasgow.

Since the late 1960s, vasectomy has been a popular and widely used form of contraceptive in Britain for couples who do not want to have any more children. However, throughout the past decade there has been considerable concern about the safety of this procedure. This paper reviews the current opinion on the possible health considerations associated with this operation and shows that the latest news is mostly reassuring.

PIP: Since the late 1960s, vasectomy has been a popular contraceptive option in Great Britain for couples who have achieved their desired family size. In recent years, however, considerable concern has been expressed about possible associations with cardiovascular disease and testicular and prostate cancer as well as long-term localized effects. This article reviewed the literature published during 1986-96 on these health concerns. Although vasectomized monkeys fed atherogenic diets appear to have a higher risk of peripheral artery disease, long-term studies of vasectomized men have failed to detect increased cardiovascular disease. No evidence has been found that vasectomy predisposes to testicular cancer or accelerates the growth of early testicular cancer. Studies demonstrating a 2-fold increase in the risk of prostate cancer after vasectomy were conducted in the US, where prostate cancer is common, and contained possible biases. European studies have not detected such an increased risk. Even if a relationship between vasectomy and prostate cancer is proven, further investigations would be required to determine if vasectomy causes prostate cancer through mechanisms such as hormonal changes, immunologic responses, or failure of growth inhibitors to reach the prostate due to obstruction of the reproductive tract, or whether vasectomized men are more exposed to the real causal agent. Moreover, even if the risk for vasectomized men in the UK is doubled, only 6/1000 men 65-74 years old would be expected to develop prostate cancer each year. The local effects of vasectomy on the reproductive tract are not fully determined. Distention of the epididymal duct occurs in most patients and granuloma formation is common. Vasectomy may also induce autoimmune orchitis. While many men develop structural changes in the reproductive tract after vasectomy, only a minority report discomfort. Although men considering vasectomy should be told that some studies have suggested a small increased risk of prostate cancer, they can be reassured that other health concerns are without foundation.

1: J Reprod Immunol. 1994 May;26(3):167-216.

Immunology of the testicular excurrent ducts. Pollanen P, Cooper TG.

Centre for Reproductive Medicine and Developmental Biology, University of Turku, Finland.

The sperm autoantigen concentration in the epididymis equals or exceeds that in the testis. This makes the epididymis a probable site of initiation of an antisperm autoimmune response. The mechanisms regulating antisperm antibody formation in the testicular excurrent ducts and some related aspects with clinical interest are reviewed.

1: Ugeskr Laeger. 1994 Apr 18;156(16):2373-4.

[Vasectomy][Article in Danish]
Iversen HG.

PIP: The first vasectomy operation was carried out 100 years ago in patients with prostate hyperplasia with symptoms. Then it became extensively used for hereditary hygiene purposes/eugenics, especially after the passing of the sterilization law in Denmark in 1935. In Nazi Germany, vasectomies and castrations were also used for forced sterilization of undesired races. Vasectomy has become a popular method of fertility control, especially in the US. In Denmark it is also popular, and since the 1973 sterilization law, approximately 100,000 procedures have been performed with a 95% rate of satisfaction. Vasectomy seems not to be as harmless as previously thought. The blockage of the transport route from the testes does not stop spermatogenesis. Spermatozoa are a certain kind of foreign matter which are first produced in puberty and act as antigens vis-a-vis other organisms. Certain immune complexes are formed that can have implication for a number of autoimmune diseases. Later in life vasectomy can be a potentiating factor in arteriosclerosis according to rhesus monkey experiments. Men with hypertension, hyperlipidemia, or heavy smokers should not undergo vasectomy. On the other hand, a 1990 epidemiological study showed no increased risk of cardiovascular diseases in vasectomized men. Yet the immune complexes could have other, more serious biological consequences. In large cohort studies the connection to testicular cancer has not been proven with certainty, but there may be an increased risk of prostate cancer among the vasectomized. The American Urological Association (AUA) has recently recommended that men over 40 who had been vasectomized should undergo examination and tests for prostate-specific antigen every year for early detection of cancer. There has been no indication of an increased mortality from prostate cancer among vasectomized men in the above epidemiological studies, but the AUA advises counseling patients about the possible connection.

1: Urology. 1994 Apr;43(4):521-4.

Relationship between antisperm antibodies and testicular histologic changes in humans after vasectomy.

Jarow JP, Goluboff ET, Chang TS, Marshall FF.
Department of Urology, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

OBJECTIVE. To determine whether or not there is an association between testicular histologic changes and antisperm antibodies in vasectomized men. METHODS. Morphometry was performed on testicular biopsy specimens obtained from 19 vasectomized men and 21 fertile control subjects. Antisperm antibody status was determined on the serum of each patient and control subject using the indirect immunobead assay. RESULTS. Significant increases in seminiferous tubule wall thickness (p < 0.001), focal interstitial fibrosis (p < 0.001), and percent composition of interstitium (p < 0.01) were observed in vasectomized men as compared with control subjects. Serum antisperm activity was present in 74 percent of the vasectomized men but none in the control subjects (p < 0.001). There was no association between testicular histologic changes and immune status. CONCLUSIONS. Vasectomized men exhibit significant testicular histologic changes and increased autoimmune activity as compared with fertile control subjects. These histologic changes are not directly associated with antisperm antibody status, suggesting that some other pathophysiologic process must be responsible.