Anyone Gone to Italy?

Thinking of perhaps going in Sept for our 1 yr wedding anniversary.

Any idea how much spending cash we would need for 8-9 days? Basic stuff like food, transportation?

Would be staying in or just outside of Rome.

Anyone rent an apartment or something like that as opposed to a hotel?

You might want to consider a package deal with something like Expedia. You can get hotel and air fare for a better rate. When do you plan on going, what month? This is important, because July and August are miserable with the humidity, and lack of air conditioning.

X2 on the lack of AC. I’ve to Italy 5 times. If your going to be on your own no tour I would expect to spend about $2000-$2200 while there(not including hotel/airfair). Remember the dollar is shit so youll lose about 25% in the exchange. I wouldnd carry much cash though as there are a lot of pickpockets. ATM are pretty accesable though. Are you renting a car? If you go to a travle agent theyll take a comission but, will get you a good deal on airfair/hotels.

If you want to rent a place I dont know much because my family has a small house that we used. If you do rent a place its fun it will lose the vacaion feel. Buying food and other essentials will be a pain because most stores close in the afternoon. For 8-9 days you can find a hotel outside off a big city for ~1200$ american. Overall its NOT a cheap trip. Tell me more about what you plan to do and I can help you a lot more.

[quote]MaximusB wrote:
You might want to consider a package deal with something like Expedia. You can get hotel and air fare for a better rate. When do you plan on going, what month? This is important, because July and August are miserable with the humidity, and lack of air conditioning. [/quote]

Yeah, it’s actually cheaper or only $50 more/person to do the flight + hotel on Expedia, weird

Looking at end of Sept or mid Oct

On Expedia air + hotel (hotel about 8km outside of Rome, I’ve read mixed reviews on this), but it’s only $850-900/person. This is for like 9-10 days IIRC

Hoping that if we pack protein bars, powder, Superfood, etc we can save some on the food costs.

There’s always the “poor college student” way to find accomodation while traveling abroad: find someone who will host you for free. Couch Surfing is a great resource when I backpacked through Europe and it saved a me a ton of money. ( http://www.couchsurfing.org/ )

It’s not the most glamorous way to travel, but there are plenty of positives. It’s free, first of all. You also get to meet locals who are mostly willing to show you around town, and give you a more authentic traveling experience.

It really just depends on how far away you’re willing to step from your comfort zone.

[quote]jehovasfitness wrote:
Thinking of perhaps going in Sept for our 1 yr wedding anniversary.

Any idea how much spending cash we would need for 8-9 days? Basic stuff like food, transportation?

Would be staying in or just outside of Rome.

Anyone rent an apartment or something like that as opposed to a hotel?[/quote]

I spent 12 days there driving around site seeing Rome, Florence, Perugia, and grabbed a ferry from Aconna to Zadar, Croatia. I did my time in Italy for under $2500. It really depends on the level of hotel you demand. Like a lot of Europe, you can find some hotels that don’t meet American standards for under $75 a night.

Traveling around Rome is real easy. There are two train lines that go pretty much everywhere. I think just the Pantheon was a bit of a walk from the nearest train station. It’s cheap too. And at night I took cabs around mostly which wasn’t that expensive either.

Food is very epensive compared to here. The portion sizes are about 1/3-1/4 the size and the prices are a bit more. Definitely bring powder and bars.

Oh and I stayed in a hotel about 10 minutes walk from the Coliseum for 60 euro per night. Had air conditioning. I think it was called Hotel Mariano

I stayed in Trastevere and took the train to Piazza de Argentina. That will get you about anywhere.

The cool thing about the Trastevere district is that it is where all the locals live and hang out. I got a more Italian experience there than I would have if I stayed closer in Rome.

Yeah, the food pretty much sucks, overpriced and the meat quality is poor. It ain’t France or Greece.

I stayed in Trastevere as well, it was awesome. Remember that a 2 star hotel in Italy is the way to go. Any higher than that and your paying for crappy tourist shit. Go 2 star and you’ll get a shower, a comfy bed, and a local host. You’ll probably even get free breakfast which is pretty standard there even at the crappiest places.

Alright bud, you are golden in those months, should be perfect, like in the mid 70’s.

Some tips for you to consider, this is my homeland, so I know my backyard…

  1. When you land at Leonardo Da Vinci Airport, take the train to Termini Station. DO NOT TAKE A CAB, you are looking at a 80-100 Euro cab fare, and you will choke on the bastard driver who smokes like a chimney. The autostrada (freeway) is a nightmare, you will sit in traffic while the meter goes up. The train is fast and is 10 Euros per ticket.

  2. There are buses that take you to all the main sites (Coliseum, Trevi Fountain, etc) and they are much better than walking around the whole city. You will save your feet, trust me those cobblestone streets can be brutal on you.

  3. Eat where the locals eat, do not eat where tourists eat (the food is overpriced and not as good.) There areas where locals eat are near Castel San Angelo. There is a place called La Francescana which is OUT-FUCKING-STANDING. You can ask for the Bucatini All’Amatriciana, you will thank me. If you are near the Spanish Steps, I recommend Caffe Leonardo, the food is so good it might make you cry. Try the ice cream, the coffee, and the pasta, it is not like anything you have ever tried. The food is so fresh, it glows. Their standard for food is much higher than here, you will not see fast food joints there. These local places are cheaper, the food is better, two people can eat like royalty for 40 Euros, and I mean 6-7 dishes with dessert.

  4. Everyone speaks English there, so don’t worry about communicating.

  5. Change money a bit at a time, you will get raped when changing dollars to Euros.

  6. Enjoy yourself, be ready to see life at a much slower pace. Your food will take awhile to arrive because it is made fresh, and people move at a snail’s pace. Bring sunglasses to cover your eyes from staring at the beautiful women. You will lose between 5-10 lbs guaranteed. Bathrooms there are known as Water Closets, which are labeled with signs “WC.” They cost .50 Euros, but they are immaculately clean.

  7. The nightlife is huge there, people are out. Campo de’ Fiori is the oldest market, and it is a great place to walk around. Also Piazza Navona, the Pantheon, Via Del Corso are jumping too.

Gelato is waiting for you.

[quote]MaximusB wrote:
Alright bud, you are golden in those months, should be perfect, like in the mid 70’s.

Some tips for you to consider, this is my homeland, so I know my backyard…

  1. When you land at Leonardo Da Vinci Airport, take the train to Termini Station. DO NOT TAKE A CAB, you are looking at a 80-100 Euro cab fare, and you will choke on the bastard driver who smokes like a chimney. The autostrada (freeway) is a nightmare, you will sit in traffic while the meter goes up. The train is fast and is 10 Euros per ticket.

  2. There are buses that take you to all the main sites (Coliseum, Trevi Fountain, etc) and they are much better than walking around the whole city. You will save your feet, trust me those cobblestone streets can be brutal on you.

  3. Eat where the locals eat, do not eat where tourists eat (the food is overpriced and not as good.) There areas where locals eat are near Castel San Angelo. There is a place called La Francescana which is OUT-FUCKING-STANDING. You can ask for the Bucatini All’Amatriciana, you will thank me. If you are near the Spanish Steps, I recommend Caffe Leonardo, the food is so good it might make you cry. Try the ice cream, the coffee, and the pasta, it is not like anything you have ever tried. The food is so fresh, it glows. Their standard for food is much higher than here, you will not see fast food joints there. These local places are cheaper, the food is better, two people can eat like royalty for 40 Euros, and I mean 6-7 dishes with dessert.

  4. Everyone speaks English there, so don’t worry about communicating.

  5. Change money a bit at a time, you will get raped when changing dollars to Euros.

  6. Enjoy yourself, be ready to see life at a much slower pace. Your food will take awhile to arrive because it is made fresh, and people move at a snail’s pace. Bring sunglasses to cover your eyes from staring at the beautiful women. You will lose between 5-10 lbs guaranteed. Bathrooms there are known as Water Closets, which are labeled with signs “WC.” They cost .50 Euros, but they are immaculately clean.

  7. The nightlife is huge there, people are out. Campo de’ Fiori is the oldest market, and it is a great place to walk around. Also Piazza Navona, the Pantheon, Via Del Corso are jumping too. [/quote]

I still remember that comment you made about NZers lol, beware though; that man in your avatar is from good ol’New Zealand.

But you’re Italian, what can I say, I love italians. Bada bing bada boom, 'nuff said Tony.

I lived in Rome for 4 years. Some suggestions. Hotel star rating is purely mechanical and only bears a nominal relationship to quality. A pensione can be a good alternative, particularly in a good location. I had visitors staying at pensione Barrett. Hotel Piazza Navona was very pleasant and would be romantic in weird way (around a courtyard, creaky walkways and odd connections to plumbing).

First rule of eating: You pay for location and for white linen and dinner jackets, not for quality. Never eat near a tourist attraction or in places where the menu is on a painted board in English. Walk to a parallel street and look where people are actually going to eat. suggestion: Filetteria di Santa Barbara on Largo dei Librari (deep fried baccala in wrapping paper and cheap local wine, heavenly, or Ambasciata de Abruzzo. Massive meal, where the only question is “red or white”. The region is famous for salamis and cold cuts.

Moretti is much better than Nastro Azzuro.

[quote]TQB wrote:
I lived in Rome for 4 years. Some suggestions. Hotel star rating is purely mechanical and only bears a nominal relationship to quality. A pensione can be a good alternative, particularly in a good location. I had visitors staying at pensione Barrett. Hotel Piazza Navona was very pleasant and would be romantic in weird way (around a courtyard, creaky walkways and odd connections to plumbing).

First rule of eating: You pay for location and for white linen and dinner jackets, not for quality. Never eat near a tourist attraction or in places where the menu is on a painted board in English. Walk to a parallel street and look where people are actually going to eat. suggestion: Filetteria di Santa Barbara on Largo dei Librari (deep fried baccala in wrapping paper and cheap local wine, heavenly, or Ambasciata de Abruzzo. Massive meal, where the only question is “red or white”. The region is famous for salamis and cold cuts.

Moretti is much better than Nastro Azzuro.[/quote]

Peroni FTW !!!