T Nation

Anyone Eat (Real) Yams or Taro?


#1

Hi, I've looked in the archives, and noticed a few Yam threads, but they almost all ended up talking about the American Sweet Potato -- not the same critter at all.

So, I want to ask,, does anyone here eat real yams? I'm most interested in whether or not anyone in North America eats yams, since they tend to be difficult to get, but to me they taste extremely good, and a lot more neutral-flavored than sweet potatoes.

I became rather enamored with this plant from my time in west Africa, especially because dry-fried it makes something similar tasting to french fries, except they can be stored all day without getting soggy, and when cooked properly have very little fat.

Hmm, on the general topic of non-standard root plants, does anyone here eat taro as their starch (apart from in natural tapioca)? I've just located a store near me that sells bulk taro flour, and I'm about to experiment with taro breads and other recipes.

Any experiences or suggestions with either of these plants (and their products), in relation to both bodybuilding nutrition and general healthy cooking, would be appreciated.


#2

I eat yams.


#3

Unless what you're eating is from Africa it's not.

American sweet potatoes were called Yams because they resembled the African Yam.

Actually saw it on Food Network last week.


#4

So I yam apparently not what I yam?

So, what is a real yam?


#5

I remember learning the differences and how true yams seemed clearly inferior (nutritionally)

As for taro, well specifically those pan fried taro cakes as part of a dim sum spread, absolutely phenomenal


#6

Correction: I'm eating yam-labeled yams at the grocery store.


#7

there's two things at the grocery store: yams and sweet potatoes. What yam I eating if I'm not eating yams? Yam know what I'm saying?


#8

Mr. Andy -- are they fresh, or canned? May I ask what type of store you found these in?

I'm on the west coast. Sometimes I find the east Asian style of yams in some of the more interesting grocery stores, but those are generally on the sweet side -- I am hoping to find the more potato-like (white to white-yellow flesh) yams -- the ones that in their raw form, are about 5 times bigger than sweet potatoes and 10 times bigger than baker potatoes and have a skin that looks almost like thin bark.

Ultimately, they might not have as good a nutritional profile as sweet potatoes but for various reasons I want to mix things up a bit.


#9

Fresh. Dominick's.


#10

Wow. Cool! I wasn't expecting any American to be much of a yam person. How do you like to prepare them? Is it a common carb meal item for you?


#11

Usually I make a hash out of it. In a skillet I brown chopped up yams, w/ chopped green pepper/onion/olive oil. I cook it on medium, covered, for ~15 minutes and put in a splash of water for more moisture. Shake the pan every now and then to cook evenly.

It's kind of a bitch to cut up yams though so I think I'm gonna start baking 'em soon. I eat more basmati rice than I do yams, though.


#12

Sam I yam?


#13

do Red Garnett Yams count? I eat at least 10 of those per week, never more than 99c / pound and like a big ass plate of them chopped and baked is only like 30-40g of carbs.


#14

Here's a good link describing the difference between sweet potatoes and yams:
http://www.marksdailyapple.com/difference-yams-sweet-potatoes/#axzz1h2EkEJXu