T Nation

Any One Use The Warrior Diet

Hello, i remember reading about Ori Hofmekler’s “Warrior Diet” a while ago. It shocked me that a strong guy could become strong from eating once a day (i noramlly eat about 5 meals). I realized that i wanted to try this and see if it could work for me.

Has anyone hear ever heard of it or tried it? thanks.

[quote]Satanicuslupis wrote:
Hello, i remember reading about Ori Hofmekler’s “Warrior Diet” a while ago. It shocked me that a strong guy could become strong from eating once a day (i noramlly eat about 5 meals). I realized that i wanted to try this and see if it could work for me.

Has anyone hear ever heard of it or tried it? thanks.[/quote]

I was intrigued by it because that’s primarily how I eat-Nothing all day until after my 5:00 PM workout-in fact I didn’t want to eat for a couple hours after that. Now, I was indiscriminate in what I ate after that, and it was 50% junk and 50% meat and milk.

I never had a problem getting stronger eating once per day.

I gained weight, both muscle and fat, pretty consistently eating this way but

I never got lean.

However, I never tried to make that one big meal cleaner.

I think he has some flaws in his reasoning though. Early humans were not genetically predisposed to eat a diet that would be healthy for a 70+ year lifespan, they just had to hunt, eat and reproduce vigorously for 35-40 years and then die and let their kids take over.

But, I think there is something wrong about the “never go hungry” mentality because hunger may increase some anabolic hormones if it doesn’t go on too long. A hungry cave-man had to be strong. It does also cause a fight or flight response however which increases lipolysis.

I think, what may be happening is this:

An 18 hour fast depletes liver and some muscle glycogen-especially with exercise. This causes rebound growth like the post workout window of opportunity. If you can adapt to burn fat and use up liver glycogen during the day, and then re-fill the liver glycogen, it may work.

Do not do this diet. It is unhealty. You are about to get majorly flamed.

[quote]keaster wrote:
Do not do this diet. It is unhealty. You are about to get majorly flamed.[/quote]

I’ve been on it for about 3 months now. I’ve gone from 11% to 7% BF. My weight has gone from 196lbs to 188lbs @ 5’8" tall. Therefore my LBM has gone up about 0.5lbs while losing 8.5lbs of fat. Also my 5 rep bench has gone from 295 to 315.

Plus…I FUCKING LOVE having energy and mental alertness all day, PLUS not having to worry about eating all the time…PLUS having more time to make money, have fun, spend time with friends…PLUS enjoy a sweet meal once per day of steak and eggs and roasted potatoes with butter, whole grain bread, salad, fruit, cheese and usually a couple dishes of ice cream for desert. YUMMY!!!

If you want to look like Ori Hofmekler, then by all means use the “Warrior Diet.” But some people don’t like looking like a refugee from a concentration camp.

But wait…

Some people can appear thin but actually be quite strong. You remember that kid in Gym class right? The one who could do all the Push-ups and hoist a great deal of weight, but was rail thin.

Well…that’s not Ori!

In all fairness, I would say that Ori, while looking like he never touched a weight in his life, is actually weaker than he appears to be!

I had the misfortune of purchasing one of Ori’s training tapes. When I saw his arms shaking Benching 135 pounds for a few reps I knew I was looking at the wrong training and nutritional program.

But of course it all comes down to goals. If you want to train with baby weights and look like you could be beaten up by the Pee Wee Herman…then by all means go with Ori Hofmekler’s programs.

(This was sort of mean huh? But, so is charging people for crap programs)

[quote]ZEB wrote:
If you want to look like Ori Hofmekler, then by all means use the “Warrior Diet.” But some people don’t like looking like a refugee from a concentration camp.

But wait…

Some people can appear thin but actually be quite strong. You remember that kid in Gym class right? The one who could do all the Push-ups and hoist a great deal of weight, but was rail thin.

Well…that’s not Ori!

In all fairness, I would say that Ori, while looking like he never touched a weight in his life, is actually weaker than he appears to be!

I had the misfortune of purchasing one of Ori’s training tapes. When I saw his arms shaking Benching 135 pounds for a few reps I knew I was looking at the wrong training and nutritional program.

But of course it all comes down to goals. If you want to train with baby weights and look like you could be beaten up by the Pee Wee Herman…then by all means go with Ori Hofmekler’s programs.

(This was sort of mean huh? But, so is charging people for crap programs)
[/quote]

Huh? I wasn’t refering to his training program but the diet itself. Hey, it works for me. It works for Mike Mahler.

Whoever posted the original question, if you want to bench 315 for reps, squat 365 ass to grass for reps and press 250+ overhead like me, do the diet. If instead you want to struggle to bench over 2 plates, constantly have people ask “Do you work out?” followed by “Oh…really???” and look like a smooth version of Tobey MCGuire (all refering to Zeb), then don’t do the diet.

Everyone is different. Old bodybuilder - think steve reeves days and jack lalane eat three squar meals a day and they werent exactly weak or out of shape. Some curent natural bodybuilders eat 6-8 times a day and look awesome and are strong, some people eat ones a day and are strong and look good.

The point is try it out and see if it works if it doesnt then try something else.

[quote]Pound4Pound wrote:
ZEB wrote:
If you want to look like Ori Hofmekler, then by all means use the “Warrior Diet.” But some people don’t like looking like a refugee from a concentration camp.

But wait…

Some people can appear thin but actually be quite strong. You remember that kid in Gym class right? The one who could do all the Push-ups and hoist a great deal of weight, but was rail thin.

Well…that’s not Ori!

In all fairness, I would say that Ori, while looking like he never touched a weight in his life, is actually weaker than he appears to be!

I had the misfortune of purchasing one of Ori’s training tapes. When I saw his arms shaking Benching 135 pounds for a few reps I knew I was looking at the wrong training and nutritional program.

But of course it all comes down to goals. If you want to train with baby weights and look like you could be beaten up by the Pee Wee Herman…then by all means go with Ori Hofmekler’s programs.

(This was sort of mean huh? But, so is charging people for crap programs)

Huh? I wasn’t refering to his training program but the diet itself. Hey, it works for me. It works for Mike Mahler.

Whoever posted the original question, if you want to bench 315 for reps, squat 365 ass to grass for reps and press 250+ overhead like me, do the diet. If instead you want to struggle to bench over 2 plates, constantly have people ask “Do you work out?” followed by “Oh…really???” and look like a smooth version of Tobey MCGuire (all refering to Zeb), then don’t do the diet.[/quote]

Yes, I’m aware that you were talking about his diet. However, I wanted to also comment on his training program as well.

I was expanding on the question…
You see this is a message board and people do that sort of thing.

From what I understand, sumo wrestlers eat this. Like Mertdawg mentioned, the prolonged fast does this to your body, which includes messing with your metabolism, and that one big meal or meals that you eat at night really gets absorbed.

People who are predisposed to being lean seem to have success on this plan. Pavel Tsatsouline and Mike Mahler are cited as people who thrive on this diet. I don’t think either of them ever had a weight problem. People who are predisposed to being on the heavy side (i.e., former fat boys or current fat boys) struggle on this plan. I tried this diet and gained weight.

Hofmekler was a writer for Penthouse. He ain’t no scientist or fitness expert.

The diet is not based on science. Hofmekler just made it up based on his observations from history. If you were a soldier in the Roman Army circa 300 a.d. then I’m sure you would have been forced to eat like this and I’m sure your body would have adapted. And you probably would not have gotten fat given the amount of physical activity you performed each day. It’s now 2006. Think about that.

I tried it for a while. I did get pretty ripped on it, maybe even below 8% bf. I had veins everywhere and I did eat as much as I could during the evening. And I ate everything.

However, I did lose quite a bit of strength and also some muscle size on it. It also hurted my stomach to eat all the food at once, because I’d be so hungry that I ate so much it would actually hurt. Also I had a hard time falling asleep.

So for a short period of time to cut up, it would be good. However, I wouldn’t use it for more that 2 or 3 months.