T Nation

Any Dentists Here?

I noticed today that the board where he has pics of his kid-patients is a lot more empty. Then, during a routine exam, I suddenly have two fillings that ‘need repair’.

Times are tough I know, but how does a layman know if dental/medical procedures are legit, or because someone lost money on his stock or real estate investments? Any metric to tell the scammers from the good guys?

Note that I have been with this dentist for 14 years, but desperate times make people do wrong things.

As with anything, I’m certain you can find someone to give you a second opinion without too much of a hassle.

Assuming, of course, you are serially looking for advice (ie, not trolling) and were stupid enough to overlook that obvious solution (which would be surprising).

Go to another dentist and see if he says the same thing.

This is your most insidious attack on Professor X yet, HH!

lol

[quote]anonym wrote:
As with anything, I’m certain you can find someone to give you a second opinion without too much of a hassle.

Assuming, of course, you are serially looking for advice (ie, not trolling) and were stupid enough to overlook that obvious solution (which would be surprising).[/quote]

No I’m not trolling. Things are bad around here. My General Practioner, for ex, has now decided that I should be seen every 6 months. I have elevated hematocrit and hemaglobin (was tested for polycythemia) and get a phlebotomy every 2 months. Now, all of a sudden, every 6 months to see him (don’t see him when the nurse does the phlebotomy).

I admittedly have a suspicious nature so maybe its me.

[quote]Iron Dwarf wrote:
This is your most insidious attack on Professor X yet, HH!

lol[/quote]

HAHA, no doubt! This is why I love HH! I anxiously await an Ayn Rand reference within the next 3 posts!

For someone with erythrocytosis, I always follow up at least every 6 mo, considering I’m responsible for not only the RX of the condition, the potential end organ damage of the condition, but also its underlying etiology; after all, an elevated Hgb is a sign, not a diagnosis.

[quote]rwwmd wrote:
For someone with erythrocytosis, I always follow up at least every 6 mo, considering I’m responsible for not only the RX of the condition, the potential end organ damage of the condition, but also its underlying etiology; after all, an elevated Hgb is a sign, not a diagnosis.[/quote]

If this is your first post here, then perhaps HH is correct in his assumption.

Are you the online version of an “ambulance chaser”? In other words, were you seeking out patients by roaming internet forums?

lol

[quote]Iron Dwarf wrote:

Are you the online version of an “ambulance chaser”? In other words, were you seeking out patients by roaming internet forums?

lol[/quote]

HAHA!

Actually we were just having this discussion the other day. My boss told a story how when he was younger every 6 months his dentist would tell him he had 4 or 5 or 6 small cavities, then drill and fill. Then after a few years of this, my boss went to another dentist and didn’t need a cavity filled but maybye one per year or less. I also remember having a LOT of fillings done from my childhood dentist.

So I believe there are some people who MAY take advantage of an unsuspecting consumer or services. After all, after the drilling is done, there is no way to tell if there in fact was decay or not correct?

V

Looks suspicious, doesn’t it ID? No, I’m just a long time lurker, who just never had anything semi intelligent to add until now; just not a lot of chatter about cancer and blood diseases here, for some reason. In terms of economic gain, I’d make a lot more if I didn’t monitor patients with erythrocytosis so closely and let them develop some end organ damage, but of course, thats not cool.

[quote]rwwmd wrote:
Looks suspicious, doesn’t it ID? No, I’m just a long time lurker, who just never had anything semi intelligent to add until now; just not a lot of chatter about cancer and blood diseases here, for some reason. In terms of economic gain, I’d make a lot more if I didn’t monitor patients with erythrocytosis so closely and let them develop some end organ damage, but of course, thats not cool.[/quote]

Welcome to the board, Doc.

I have this pain… :wink:

[quote]rwwmd wrote:
Looks suspicious, doesn’t it ID? No, I’m just a long time lurker, who just never had anything semi intelligent to add until now; just not a lot of chatter about cancer and blood diseases here, for some reason. In terms of economic gain, I’d make a lot more if I didn’t monitor patients with erythrocytosis so closely and let them develop some end organ damage, but of course, thats not cool.[/quote]

HH is on TRT is why he has poly.

Why doesn’t it surprise me that HH frequents internet forums with pictures of kids?

Just a note on second opinions; while I agree they are an excellent idea, its important that when one sees a doc (or dentist) for a second opinion not to ask if the first practitioner screwed up; we are all conditioned to say “no”. The right approach is to ask the dentist if he would have handled the situation in question the same way the first dentist did; then you’ll get an honest response, and allow the dentist not to directly impune the character of a colleague. (If I see someone for a second opinion who’s wearing a T-Nation shirt, however, I’ll give them the straight story).

A few years ago a dentist wanted to do $4500 worth of work on my mouth. I went to another dentist and he told me I only needed one filling. Second opinions can be a Good Idea.

[quote]nrt wrote:
A few years ago a dentist wanted to do $4500 worth of work on my mouth. I went to another dentist and he told me I only needed one filling. Second opinions can be a Good Idea.[/quote]

Yeah, more often than not you win on this sort of situation. However, what if the first dentist IS right, and you do need $4500 worth of work and your second dentist is wrong? I know this is highly unlikely (with the huge difference in money) but i totally agree that second opinions can be priceless.

Something like this happened to my father when he went to a new dentist after moving. Lot of fillings. Then he thought, Hey, I hadn’t had a cavity in years, where are these all coming from? and decided to see a different dentist.

I don’t know much about it, but I understand that dentists can take more or less aggressive or conservative approach. They might not all handle the same stuff the same way. One might watch a little patch of decay, while the other might say it would eventually need filling so do it now. I want the conservative approach. I’ve gone in for a crown, but then my dentist took X-rays and decided to try to fill it and was successful. He says that he uses a very small drill to take as little tooth out as possible, and has to repeatedly check to see if he’s gotten all the decay. And then once he had gotten all the decay, there was a possibility there wouldn’t be enough tooth left to hold a filling, and need a crown anyway. Fortunately, the filling worked. That saved me hundreds of dollars, but more importantly, a lot of natural tooth.

He says that his fellow dentists say he is crazy to take the time to do it this way, but he says that’s what he would want for himself or his family, so that’s what he does for his patients. (He does make up some of the time by being insanely efficient about everything. You’d think he had done time and motion studies on every procedure, and if his assistant is 2 seconds late handing him the tool he needs, she hears about it.) Needless to say, I’m very glad I found this dentist. Several different friends, who don’t know each other, all recommended him.