T Nation

Anterior Shoulder Pain During Certain Movements

Hey guys, I had put off posting this for a few reasons, one being that I have been absent from the boards for quite some time and two being its another shoulder thread, and so many go unread. I have had great luck with help from yall so Ill give it a go again. Not entirely sure where to start… in my absence I have trained about 75 percent consistently, diet has been way out of whack and all that.

Sometime mid to late last year I started having mild discomfort in the front of my shoulder during front raises. I pretty much ignored it and moved on and dealt with it. At this time I was doing 5/3/1 and after the overhead press would superset lateral raises, front raises, and overhead press with DB’s. Looking back I think my form was off with the bar tracking a little too far forward on the OH Press, and a little out of whack on the lateral raises.

I cant quite remember the exact progression, but at some point I added in direct bicep movements, and the pain progressed some, to pain in the front of the shoulder after non supported curl movements. (I found that preacher curls, even done maximally, do not seem to cause much aggravation of the area)

Around the end of the year I pretty much had a constant pain in the front of my shoulder when I decided to take time away from training to take a break, be around family, take a vacation, holidays etc. That was sometime around the beginning of December.

During the same time (unrelated or not, which is one thing that is really bugging me that I am not sure) I have had a tight knot and pain in my back, around my shoulder blade towards the inside of the back. Im not familiar with what muscle is exactly causing the issue here, but after some time off work and from the gym it started to feel better. Actually it was pain free after a week off work, so I believe it was due to stress at work, as well as a crappy work position of always being on the phone, having my right arm extended for mouse use, as well as always looking left to stare at the computer screen. I started to think about that this year after returning to work and I believe the pain came on when I switched desks at work, to a much worse set up and less ergonomic. I have since started massaging the area with a tennis ball nearly every day and have fixed my work situation as best I can, and the pain is nearly gone, but still nags if my posture slips or I dont roll it out or am overly stressed.

This brings us up to the first of the year, front of the shoulder is pain free, and I am doing my best to keep the pain in the rear of my shoulder near the shoulder blade pain free and relaxed. I was having liposuction the fist half of january to rid myself of some lingering crap from spending the bulk of my life on this planet as a fat blob so I stayed out of the gym until that was done and well.

A week after my surgery the Dr. gave me the green light for upper body work, and I figured it was a good time to clean the diet back up and diet in honor of my 30th birthday to be in the best shape ever. That first week was mostly BI-TRI work and immediately the pain in the front of my shoulder was back. I started taking ibuprofen in the AM and icing the front of the shoulder for 5-15 minutes after working out depending on time available. usually after ice im pain free for the rest of the day, sometimes its a little sore for the day and ill pop another ibuprofen if it flares up.

I think that sums it up for the most part.

Movements that cause pain directly : bench press, floor press, lateral raise, hammer curls. the pain is also accompanied by weakness during these movements as well. While I may not have pain doing, for example, DB OH press, I have pain trying to hoist a DB into a starting position.

I have been trying to educate myself on the shoulder and well… we all know how complicated that joint is. I ping pong between bicep tendonitis, impingement, some sort of rotator cuff issue.

I freely admit that I haven’t spent enough time with upper body pulling movements, but now I have band system to mimic a pulley system so I have already begun more rowing and such.

My Current Plan:
I have a small electro massage device, and I plan on trying to use that on the area in the evenings. I plan on icing the area after workouts, mid day and trying to do so at night, after the electro massage. I am considering bumping the ibuprofen from one pill a day (I believe 200mg) to one 3 times a day.

I believe I know most of the trigger type movements, so I will be avoiding known curls that cause a flare up, horizontal pressing, and some of the shoulder work that was causing issue, and add in light or no weight rotator cuff rehab work.

I have also tried stretching more in the chest and doing more foam roller work and trying to work the chest with the tennis ball and the shoulder area as well, as these items have been inconsistent at best in my training.

Oh, and depending on how this goes I may go ahead and see an Ortho, but the only one I know of, which I have used when I nearly severed my finger, does not have any appointments until the end of the year, so I figured I would come up with a plan to try and fix the situation in the mean time, and maybe save myself a trip, who knows.

Same issue here. Back of shoulder and extends to the shoulder blade. I haven’t benched in a year.

I don’t do push ups anymore. for chest i do iso contractios “flexing” for as long as i can and it does burn. i also only use bands and mainly focus on conditioning. welcome to my world.

[quote]jch6565 wrote:
I don’t do push ups anymore. for chest i do iso contractios “flexing” for as long as i can and it does burn. i also only use bands and mainly focus on conditioning. welcome to my world. [/quote]

With all due respect, I don’t intend on being in that world long, I would like to go back to training normally, as soon as possible.

Also, the pain in the rear of my shoulder is not a major concern, as I feel its posture and stress related and is going away… its the pain and weakness in the front that is my concern and needs addressing.

I’m assuming you have pain during bench pressing at the very bottom of the movement?

Do you lean on your elbows a lot? Think about your whole day. Working, driving, any rec things, etc.

What position do you sleep in?

And what rotator cuff are you doing?

I didn’t read your article all the way through, but I’ve had consistent shoulder problems and these are things that worked for me:

-Give forearm dexterity, flexibility, and strength a focus. Forearm strength and dexterity have a direct influence on the mechanics of the elbow and shoulder (it’s where you first make contact with the bar; if that’s fucked up, everything else will be, too). I’ve been doing sand bucket training (fill bucket with sand, dig hands down, practice finger movement[blast fingers out, dig, etc…]) and I’ve had chronic shoulder issues (two dislocations) and it has had the most marked effect on my shoulder stability. This can also be referenced to squeezing the bar harder as you press.

-Recognize when you are fucking your body up. Sitting at a desk using a mouse for 8 hours is horrible for the body, and forcing it into a workout at 6 pm after said work day will only push you farther away from healthy shoulders. You have to understand that with your lifestyle constant maintenance of your shoulders is necessary just for the possibility of “feeling good” throughout your day. Roll that shit out and stretch (if people are looking at you funny from their cubicle, you’re doing it right).

-Do some extra upper back work. I’m not saying devote another workout to your back, but throw in some face-pulls, rear-delt raises, hell, even incline shrugs; mostly after your chest/shoulder workout. This simple act of reestablishing your mind-muscle connection can do wonders.

-Pressure points, pressure points, PRESSURE POINTS. Practice self-myofascial release techniques and get to know your body. Recognizing where you hold stress can open up many doors to eventually becoming relaxed.

-This sounds ridiculous, but “know” the muscles you are training. An example of this is as I tried to improve my bench: I would focus on retracting my scapula, arching my back, pushing through the floor, packing my neck, flexing my glutes, tucking my elbows, breathing into my stomach, bringing my “chest to the bar”, when in the end I really just needed to focus on squeezing my pecs. I’m not saying this automatically work for you, but it was a revelation that, while simple, did a lot for me (felt my right shoulder blade squeeze forward for the first time in a great while).

Good luck with your shoulders, they can (and will) be a bitch.

[quote]BReddy wrote:
I’m assuming you have pain during bench pressing at the very bottom of the movement?
[/quote]
Correct. As well as lifting DBs into, for instance, an OH Press.

at the moment, unfortunately i do put a lot of strain on my right side, between the computer mouse and day to day activities. I am still trying to correct these issues, as I think they have the most affect on the rear of my shoulder. My “desk” is counter height, and I am progressively spending more time standing than sitting on my stool, and that has helped some.

I try and sleep on my left side or my stomach as much as possible, I usually don’t feel any pain or discomfort if I sleep on my right side, but I try to limit it as much as I can manage just to be on the safe side.

I am currently doing… is it called shoulder dislocations? with a broom handle, and on Fridays I do some external rotations, internal rotations, wall slides, i may be missing something else, but I am not too sure what else I COULD be doing.

I appreciate it, I know I can be long winded, but I also wanted to give as much info as possible, to try and get a response

I have never heard of this, but it sounds good, and different, and I will look into it some more and give it a shot. I bet my wife will enjoy this too, as one of her limiting issues in the gym is a weak grip. I do have a weird issue with my right wrist, I pulled something in it at work, but the dr. prescribed OTC NSAIDS and work the wrist with light curls with a soup can. That kinda comes and goes…

I am constantly trying to evolve how my posture is at work. I sell automotive parts, so I “sit” at a counter all day, and lately have been standing more, and trying to adjust my monitor/keyboard/mouse so help. It does help, but I am considering bring a tennis ball to work to roll out my upper back, where the pain I have is. I run and lift in the morning, foam roll, use the tennis ball and stretch and I come in to work feeling great. Usually mid day, more or less especially depending on stress, it will get worse. I wish I could figure out a way to hook up my electro massage do-dad myself to that area, as I feel it would be amazing to sit at lunch and let it do its thing.

This is one thing I have managed to neglect progressively over the past 2 years or so, as I got fatter or this or that, Chin ups would drop out, then I got rid of the pulley system, so other things dropped out, until just recently how imbalanced my workouts were. I am correcting that as of a few weeks ago, adding in more back work and pulling.

working very hard with this, and is something I need to make myself do midday at work. Its quite an amazing thing and I wish I had realized lots of this sooner, or I should say, made myself do it.

And another thing that I am trying to work on. I had a lot of what I call “ah ha!” moments in the past few months, was it turning 30 and having some revelation I dont know, but its disappointing that I realized a lot of things and have more drive now that in the past few years, and I have an injury.

[quote]
Good luck with your shoulders, they can (and will) be a bitch.[/quote]

Thank you for all your input, it helps to drive home the things that I know I should be doing, and that I need to make sure I maintain doing them

Those “Ah HA!” moments will keep coming, so use them as inspiration. You sound like your head is in the right place and it’s actually a good thing that you have had more drive in the past few years as you’re having to focus more specifically on your body. Stay patient and don’t get discouraged; as you start to put all of these things together and they become “regular” you will get more complete results. Good luck out there

[quote]Bmacres wrote:
Those “Ah HA!” moments will keep coming, so use them as inspiration. You sound like your head is in the right place and it’s actually a good thing that you have had more drive in the past few years as you’re having to focus more specifically on your body. Stay patient and don’t get discouraged; as you start to put all of these things together and they become “regular” you will get more complete results. Good luck out there [/quote]

Thanks, Im a lot more self aware these days, I think a lot of it has to do with being older and wiser, as well as having a decent strength foundation so that the last thing I am generally concerned with is how much weight is on the bar. Usually…

still trying to figure out this shoulder issue though, this morning I skipped bench presses, and hit:
pushups - no pain
cable flys - no pain if I made sure my elbows and hands did not go behind my body
DB press, which gave no pain if, I again, kept my elbows above my body.

Ice afterward and some ibuprofen and ive felt pretty good today. Just hope in a few weeks maybe whatever is whacked out in there will correct itself.

[quote]johnward82 wrote:

[quote]Bmacres wrote:
Those “Ah HA!” moments will keep coming, so use them as inspiration. You sound like your head is in the right place and it’s actually a good thing that you have had more drive in the past few years as you’re having to focus more specifically on your body. Stay patient and don’t get discouraged; as you start to put all of these things together and they become “regular” you will get more complete results. Good luck out there [/quote]

Thanks, Im a lot more self aware these days, I think a lot of it has to do with being older and wiser, as well as having a decent strength foundation so that the last thing I am generally concerned with is how much weight is on the bar. Usually…

still trying to figure out this shoulder issue though, this morning I skipped bench presses, and hit:
pushups - no pain
cable flys - no pain if I made sure my elbows and hands did not go behind my body
DB press, which gave no pain if, I again, kept my elbows above my body.

Ice afterward and some ibuprofen and ive felt pretty good today. Just hope in a few weeks maybe whatever is whacked out in there will correct itself. [/quote]

I haven’t seen you, but I’d put a lot of money on you having humeral anterior glide. (It’s how I knew you lean on your elbows a fair amount.)

You’re getting pain in front of the shoulder because the front of the capsule is irritated. The “humerus” is “gliding” “anteriorly” too often.

For example, you lean on your elbows, this will cause the humerus to glide forward. Think leaning on your elbows and notice how much bonier your shoulder is all of a sudden. Touch where that bony shoulder now is…this is likely where you are having your pain.

Anything where your elbows travel behind your torso is causing you pain because this is when the humerus is likely to glide forward. Again, stick your elbow behind your torso, like a DB row, or the bottom portion of a bench press, you’ll notice your shoulder is boney and this is where you are having pain.

Look at this video. Notice the front of the shoulder and how it is “gliding” towards the bench. This is where this woman used to have pain:

Now look at this video. No glide = no more pain:

Doing a bunch of rowing and upper back work will NOT solve this. It’s a long reason why, but, succinctly, this condition is typical in those with overactive lats. The lats are used in nearly all pulling movements. NOT something you want. You want to train the subscapularis. One of the cuff muscles. An often weak one.

Unfortunately, just ice and ibuprofen won’t solve this either. The pain will come back because you aren’t solving the issue. From watching the first video you can tell the issue is how the woman’s shoulder is moving. Correct the movement and you get rid of the pain.

Some massage type work on your posterior cuff / lats will help too. Think of it this way: You’re too mobile in the front of your shoulder capsule (notice how by elimnating how much the woman’s shoulder joint could move forward we helped alleviate her pain), when you’re too mobile in one direction you’re too stiff in another. Thus, you are too mobile anteriorly and too stiff posteriorly.

Oh, and stop leaning on your elbows! :).

Hope this helps!

FYI, here’s more on anterior glide: http://b-reddy.org/2011/06/19/best-exercises-for-the-subscapularis/

[quote]BReddy wrote:

[quote]johnward82 wrote:

[quote]Bmacres wrote:
Those “Ah HA!” moments will keep coming, so use them as inspiration. You sound like your head is in the right place and it’s actually a good thing that you have had more drive in the past few years as you’re having to focus more specifically on your body. Stay patient and don’t get discouraged; as you start to put all of these things together and they become “regular” you will get more complete results. Good luck out there [/quote]

Thanks, Im a lot more self aware these days, I think a lot of it has to do with being older and wiser, as well as having a decent strength foundation so that the last thing I am generally concerned with is how much weight is on the bar. Usually…

still trying to figure out this shoulder issue though, this morning I skipped bench presses, and hit:
pushups - no pain
cable flys - no pain if I made sure my elbows and hands did not go behind my body
DB press, which gave no pain if, I again, kept my elbows above my body.

Ice afterward and some ibuprofen and ive felt pretty good today. Just hope in a few weeks maybe whatever is whacked out in there will correct itself. [/quote]

I haven’t seen you, but I’d put a lot of money on you having humeral anterior glide. (It’s how I knew you lean on your elbows a fair amount.)

You’re getting pain in front of the shoulder because the front of the capsule is irritated. The “humerus” is “gliding” “anteriorly” too often.

For example, you lean on your elbows, this will cause the humerus to glide forward. Think leaning on your elbows and notice how much bonier your shoulder is all of a sudden. Touch where that bony shoulder now is…this is likely where you are having your pain.

Anything where your elbows travel behind your torso is causing you pain because this is when the humerus is likely to glide forward. Again, stick your elbow behind your torso, like a DB row, or the bottom portion of a bench press, you’ll notice your shoulder is boney and this is where you are having pain.

Look at this video. Notice the front of the shoulder and how it is “gliding” towards the bench. This is where this woman used to have pain:

Now look at this video. No glide = no more pain:

Doing a bunch of rowing and upper back work will NOT solve this. It’s a long reason why, but, succinctly, this condition is typical in those with overactive lats. The lats are used in nearly all pulling movements. NOT something you want. You want to train the subscapularis. One of the cuff muscles. An often weak one.

Unfortunately, just ice and ibuprofen won’t solve this either. The pain will come back because you aren’t solving the issue. From watching the first video you can tell the issue is how the woman’s shoulder is moving. Correct the movement and you get rid of the pain.

Some massage type work on your posterior cuff / lats will help too. Think of it this way: You’re too mobile in the front of your shoulder capsule (notice how by elimnating how much the woman’s shoulder joint could move forward we helped alleviate her pain), when you’re too mobile in one direction you’re too stiff in another. Thus, you are too mobile anteriorly and too stiff posteriorly.

Oh, and stop leaning on your elbows! :).

Hope this helps!

FYI, here’s more on anterior glide: http://b-reddy.org/2011/06/19/best-exercises-for-the-subscapularis [/quote]

Thank you, I THINK, I understand your bony example… at least, I know I can feel where it is tender easier when I rest my elbow forward on the counter.

I really appreciate the info, and while I cant view the videos at the moment as I am at work, I will be sure to view them later. Hopefully it will all become clear then. I get the basics of what you are saying, I guess I just need to know what exactly to do now.

And, I have had what you had said on my mind the past day or so, and I am tring to stand a lot more at work, and not lean on my elbows so much… but its proving very tough, one just because of my day to day work, but because well… I am naturally a lazy leaner. :slight_smile:

Johnward82, I had the same biceps tendonitis pain that you described for about 2-3 years before getting surgery to fix the problem. After trying every variety of rehab work for about 2 years, I could not get the biceps tendonitis (and supraspinatus tendonitis) to go away. I could not do bench press, overhead press, or pull-ups/lat pull-downs without pain. I ended up getting A/C joint surgery and subacromial scoping. The subacromial decompression completely got rid of the tendonitis.

I wish I would have done the surgery a lot sooner. I’m a big fan of pre-hab and re-hab exercises first and foremost. However, if that doesn’t work, you may want to talk to an orthopedic surgeon about the subacromial scoping. You could also have more serious issues, like a labrum tear, so an MRI would be helpful to let you know what your up against.

I’m have been able to resume all exercises again; however, I now substitute flat bench press with incline bench press. Incline bench press (in my opinion) put the humerus and scapula in a much more shoulder friendly position for pressing.

[quote]RMichael wrote:
Johnward82, I had the same biceps tendonitis pain that you described for about 2-3 years before getting surgery to fix the problem. After trying every variety of rehab work for about 2 years, I could not get the biceps tendonitis (and supraspinatus tendonitis) to go away. I could not do bench press, overhead press, or pull-ups/lat pull-downs without pain. I ended up getting A/C joint surgery and subacromial scoping. The subacromial decompression completely got rid of the tendonitis.

I wish I would have done the surgery a lot sooner. I’m a big fan of pre-hab and re-hab exercises first and foremost. However, if that doesn’t work, you may want to talk to an orthopedic surgeon about the subacromial scoping. You could also have more serious issues, like a labrum tear, so an MRI would be helpful to let you know what your up against.

I’m have been able to resume all exercises again; however, I now substitute flat bench press with incline bench press. Incline bench press (in my opinion) put the humerus and scapula in a much more shoulder friendly position for pressing. [/quote]

Thanks for sharing! I hope to not have to have surgery, but if things do not get better in about 6 weeks (I have a vacation coming up) I will see the ortho upon returning. There are a few things that I want to have happen and get in line before I actually head that direction. I do not wish to string this along any longer than needed.

@BReddy-

So let me see if I have things straight-

More or less, the posterior pain is caused by sloppy posture, and its long term consequence has become the anterior shoulder pain.

Would correcting my posture, and any related sloppy form on lifts correct the underlying issues causing the pain, in your opinion? In viewing the pictures you have on your website of the distance in the rear of the shoulder from it being rounded forward, I realized my shoulders look similar.

What I have done up until this point, as of reading what your thoughts were, as well as reading the page you linked me to:

As of this morning I have began an effort to correct my rounded shoulders. Back and low with the chest out, with respect to “matching” the shoulder position in your photos. (My right shoulder, which is also the one with the pain, does hang lower than the left, but it always has.) Has this helped any in the pain in the rear of my shoulder? Maybe, but my main stressor at work was not here today (a coworker) and I have also changed up my work station.

When I got to work, my boss gave me a new bracket for my monitor, so it now is closer to eye level while I am standing. I have adjusted to position of my keyboard and mouse in an effort to stop leaning forward so much and looking down. I have also managed to not ONCE lean on my elbows… every time I went to do it, I thought of this thread… guess thats a positive.

Today I did some bicep work, and left the gym pain free. Preacher curls, concentration curls, very light weight hammer curls. In my back work I also added in some face pulls. I had never done them before, but at the end of my session my back felt great. I was pleased.

Assuming all this is getting on the right track…
Viewing your website with your suggestions on rotator cuff exercises, would you pick a few and incorporate them every day? A few times a week? Would you do them before your workout… or would/could I do them at a different time of day altogether?

I think that is all of my thoughts on the subject at the moment, though as it is nearing the end of the day the pain in the rear of my shoulder has starting to become noticeable.

@Johnward, I know your last question was not posed to me, but here’s my two cents. Your approach seems to be on the right track. You can do rehab exercises daily or 2-3 times per week…just do them. Your not trying make them big and strong like your legs or chest, for example (which require a lot of rest and recovery)…you’re goal is to get them proficient at pulling your humerus down and back in the glenohumeral joint and keeping it there. The more space you create under your acromion for your biceps tendon and supraspinatus to move, the more you’ll reduce the tendonitis inflammation. So, you’ll want to target your low traps, mid traps, rhomboids, rear delts, and infraspinatus (primarily). I/Y/T exercises, face pulls, external rotations, and seated rowing exercises are all good options. Sretch your chest (a lot). And, avoid exercises that cause you pain in your front delt (biceps tendonitis). Last, posture is key. Practice good posture on all exercises (chest up/shoulders back and down) and most importantly…keep up the good posture throughout the day. If the afore-mentioned still doesn’t work for you, then go see a good M.D. Also to note: Eric Cressey and Mike Roberts have a ton of good posture correction articles on T-Nation (start with the Neanderthal No More article series); and Kelly Starrett has a great resource at www.mobilitywod.com for rehab/mobility exercises. Good luck to you!

@RMichael,
thanks for the reply! I use T-Nation for most of my information in the training world, and embarrassingly I never once thought to check for posture articles! DOH! Hat tip to you.

As for the stretches and things, I am in a rut and a real one trick pony when it comes to things like this, largely I think because I train at home alone. Im not looking for anyone to do any research for me, but got any other helpful suggestions?

John, I’ll send you a private message. I don’t want to bore anyone else with the back-and-forth…

[quote]BReddy wrote:

[quote]johnward82 wrote:

[quote]Bmacres wrote:
Those “Ah HA!” moments will keep coming, so use them as inspiration. You sound like your head is in the right place and it’s actually a good thing that you have had more drive in the past few years as you’re having to focus more specifically on your body. Stay patient and don’t get discouraged; as you start to put all of these things together and they become “regular” you will get more complete results. Good luck out there [/quote]

Thanks, Im a lot more self aware these days, I think a lot of it has to do with being older and wiser, as well as having a decent strength foundation so that the last thing I am generally concerned with is how much weight is on the bar. Usually…

still trying to figure out this shoulder issue though, this morning I skipped bench presses, and hit:
pushups - no pain
cable flys - no pain if I made sure my elbows and hands did not go behind my body
DB press, which gave no pain if, I again, kept my elbows above my body.

Ice afterward and some ibuprofen and ive felt pretty good today. Just hope in a few weeks maybe whatever is whacked out in there will correct itself. [/quote]

I haven’t seen you, but I’d put a lot of money on you having humeral anterior glide. (It’s how I knew you lean on your elbows a fair amount.)

You’re getting pain in front of the shoulder because the front of the capsule is irritated. The “humerus” is “gliding” “anteriorly” too often.

For example, you lean on your elbows, this will cause the humerus to glide forward. Think leaning on your elbows and notice how much bonier your shoulder is all of a sudden. Touch where that bony shoulder now is…this is likely where you are having your pain.

Anything where your elbows travel behind your torso is causing you pain because this is when the humerus is likely to glide forward. Again, stick your elbow behind your torso, like a DB row, or the bottom portion of a bench press, you’ll notice your shoulder is boney and this is where you are having pain.

Look at this video. Notice the front of the shoulder and how it is “gliding” towards the bench. This is where this woman used to have pain:

Now look at this video. No glide = no more pain:

Doing a bunch of rowing and upper back work will NOT solve this. It’s a long reason why, but, succinctly, this condition is typical in those with overactive lats. The lats are used in nearly all pulling movements. NOT something you want. You want to train the subscapularis. One of the cuff muscles. An often weak one.

Unfortunately, just ice and ibuprofen won’t solve this either. The pain will come back because you aren’t solving the issue. From watching the first video you can tell the issue is how the woman’s shoulder is moving. Correct the movement and you get rid of the pain.

Some massage type work on your posterior cuff / lats will help too. Think of it this way: You’re too mobile in the front of your shoulder capsule (notice how by elimnating how much the woman’s shoulder joint could move forward we helped alleviate her pain), when you’re too mobile in one direction you’re too stiff in another. Thus, you are too mobile anteriorly and too stiff posteriorly.

Oh, and stop leaning on your elbows! :).

Hope this helps!

FYI, here’s more on anterior glide: http://b-reddy.org/2011/06/19/best-exercises-for-the-subscapularis/[/quote]

I really enjoyed the website. Great work.

Wow, too much to read.

Your shoulder is a ball and socket basically, be careful with your movement patterns and also look into shoulder impingement for your anterior shoulder pain. Could be brought on from over head presses.