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Anterior Pelvic Tilt

Guys I would aprechiate any advise that you have for me, to solve my problem with anterior pelvic tilt. First let me warn you that english is my second language, incease you start wondering why I spell like a retard.

Anyway let me give you my stats and some backround information on me.

5’7" tall
BW of (79kg) 175lb
Squat (160kg) 355lb
Bench (130kg) 288lb
Deadlift (205kg) 451lb

I started powerlifting about a year ago. During this time I have found it very hard to improve my squat poundages, but found it relatively easy to make good gains on my bench and deadlift. I was always pondering why is that I can not out squat my deadlift.
First I suspected that I have a problem with my technic and read up on squating as much as I could. Technicly I read everiyhing by Dave Tate and Luise S. By the way I train Westside style :slight_smile:

However, last week someone pointed out the hard facts, that I have anterior pelvic tilt and advised me to read Militant hypertrophy, here at T-mag. I found the articles Militant hypertrophy and Pelvis left the Building, very informative.

I am 100% determined to fix my problem and I am avare of that I need to train and strenghten my abs. Abdominal trainig will get the highest priority in my training. In this matter I will reffer to articles writen by Ian King and Don Alessi. I will also spend some extra time on streching my lowerback/hipflexors before and after training and at least once off training days. Also I will reduce my squat poundages and try to re-program my neurogical pathways to learn the correct form of squat ( without the APT ). I will probably practice on paralel or high boxes and rise the weights only if I am happy with my form.I will also hit my hamstrings hard on the GHR and do some extra movements for my glutes, probably lunges.

The one thing I am hesitant about is the use of the Reverse hyper in my program. I kind of feel that this would contribute to my lower back tightness. What do you advise?
In your opinion, what else do I need to do, to fix it?

The main problem with Anterior Pelvic tilt is the hip flexors. Make sure you stretch them. Remember, people who sit at desks all day develop the same problem without ever lifting weights.

Great to hear that you are going to try and fix it. You need to strengthen your multifidus, no matter how tight you think your back is. Making ab training a priority is also a great start. Just make sure that you train the abs to stabilise the pelvis first, i.e lower ab stuff. Keep the nuetral spine while lowering a leg etc. Also, if one has an anterior pelvic tilt then they will more than likely have poor postrue in the upper back and chest. This is because the increased arch in your low back makes your body lean back. To compensate for this your head comes forward and so does your shoulders. An excellent priced book for functional training of the lower abs is “functional training for sports” by boyle. Another great read is paul cheks book “the golf biomechanics manual.” But that is much more expensive. Many people try and do the right thing with the lower ab training, but just end up doing it wrong. It is a long road. Remember that this postural problem has occured over many years, so you will not fix it over night. But being aware of your posture is a great start. If you do not get the replies that you hope for, then just pm me. Good luck.

As nArKeD said “The main problem with Anterior Pelvic tilt is the hip flexors”. This is true! But there can also be other dysfunctions! Go see a chiropractor. They treats this problem with manipulation treatment. It very effective togehter with stretching.
Don`t use leg raise and shit like that when u work abdominals!

//SA

Damn, why can’t you do leg raises? I have the same problem and leg raises are a significant portion of my ab training. I guess it involves hip flexors? Also, what are good hip flexor stretches? Are they like that stretch the dude in the jumping article was doing?

Leth: Yes the fipflexor stretch is shown in that jumping artcle.

Yes the iliopsoas and rectus femoris (hipflexors) is often too tigth and needs stretching, not much training. As i Chiropractor I see this kind of problems daily.

The rectus abdominal muscle (6-pack) have not anything to do with your leggs! It dont insert on you leggs, so it can`t flex the hip! Your rectus abdominis realy only do the “crunching movment”!

//Powrman

short tight hip flexors, long weak lower abdominals

Thank you guys. I apprechiate the imput.
I went to see somene about it. He has comfirmed the tilt and the fact that I have very tight hipflexors.
As far as training goes , I have started to do a program by Don Alessi issue 200/Iron Dog. I live squating alone for a few weeks and focuse on my lower abdominal area and the hipflexors.

Any body has any idea on the reverse hyper? Should I just leave it while I am trying to fix my tilt??/

Dynamic hip flexibility is the answer to you problem.

I’ve had anterior pelvic tilt even with extremely strong abs (including lower abs). At 185 pounds and 9% BF I had a 34" waist. But my hip flexors were gigantic from all the years of kicking in Karate. Stretch the hip flexors and the lower back twice a day. Right now I’m using defranco’s hip flexor stretch with the old sit and reach for the posterior chain and lower back. I should be doing some other stretches but they are contraindicted until I can get some work done on my quads/knee.

got the same dam problem, shouldn’t have spent these past few years being a computer whiz.

I am looking for a program to correct pelvic tilt. I found the article of EC but I would like to check what D.Alessi has said about the subject.
Is there someone who can point me to his articles on the subject. I googled about issues from iron dog but I found nothing.

Thanks in advance

Stretch your psoas or iliopsoas (google some stretches)
Stretch rectus femoris
Stretch pectineus and adductors

Look for exercises to strengthen your upper hamstrings.

[quote]nArKeD wrote:
I’ve had anterior pelvic tilt even with extremely strong abs (including lower abs). At 185 pounds and 9% BF I had a 34" waist. But my hip flexors were gigantic from all the years of kicking in Karate.

Stretch the hip flexors and the lower back twice a day. Right now I’m using defranco’s hip flexor stretch with the old sit and reach for the posterior chain and lower back. I should be doing some other stretches but they are contraindicted until I can get some work done on my quads/knee.[/quote]

Does this mean having an APT causes one to have a larger waist regardless of BF%?

If you suffer from an APT (or any of the resulting issues like pulled hammies, LBP, anterior knee pain, etc.) be sure to read my article “Fixing Your Force Couples.” It’s really not as simple as just doing a few stretches - your entire program needs to revolve around fixing the issue.

For instance, you may need to stretch your rectus femoris, get soft tissue work done on your spinal erectors, strengthen your glute max and glute medius, strengthen your external obliques, etc. Just saying to do one thing isn’t going to solve a body-wide problem.

Start by reading the article and it should point you in the right direction. Good luck!

MR

[quote]bourbonboy wrote:
Great to hear that you are going to try and fix it. You need to strengthen your multifidus, no matter how tight you think your back is. Making ab training a priority is also a great start. Just make sure that you train the abs to stabilise the pelvis first, i.e lower ab stuff. Keep the nuetral spine while lowering a leg etc. Also, if one has an anterior pelvic tilt then they will more than likely have poor postrue in the upper back and chest. This is because the increased arch in your low back makes your body lean back. To compensate for this your head comes forward and so does your shoulders. An excellent priced book for functional training of the lower abs is “functional training for sports” by boyle. Another great read is paul cheks book “the golf biomechanics manual.” But that is much more expensive. Many people try and do the right thing with the lower ab training, but just end up doing it wrong. It is a long road. Remember that this postural problem has occured over many years, so you will not fix it over night. But being aware of your posture is a great start. If you do not get the replies that you hope for, then just pm me. Good luck.[/quote]

This is exactly what I have and been trying to fix. Sometimes my upper and lower back form an “S” when looking at it from a sideview. I’ve been stretching my hip flexors by doing the “warrior lunge”. I really do feel the stretch and it kind of hurts sometimes. I’ve been also stretching my lower back by laying flat on the floor and pulling both knees to my chest.

Also been doing back leg kicks for my glutes, leg curls for my hammies and also a variation of good mornings. For my abs I’ve been doing leg raises trying to isolate my lower abs instead of my hip flexors. I’ve also been doing reverse crunches, planks, side planks.

Any suggestions or recommendations on my program would be appreciated.

Does anyone know how long should one expect to see results from this??? I’ve dealing with lower back pain and I’m positive that my APT is one of the culprids.

Thanks in advance…

maguirre

excellent post, thanks all for the tips! any stretch besides warrior lunge?

[quote]Mike Robertson wrote:
If you suffer from an APT (or any of the resulting issues like pulled hammies, LBP, anterior knee pain, etc.) be sure to read my article “Fixing Your Force Couples.” It’s really not as simple as just doing a few stretches - your entire program needs to revolve around fixing the issue.

For instance, you may need to stretch your rectus femoris, get soft tissue work done on your spinal erectors, strengthen your glute max and glute medius, strengthen your external obliques, etc. Just saying to do one thing isn’t going to solve a body-wide problem.

Start by reading the article and it should point you in the right direction. Good luck!

MR[/quote]
I have to say that is one the best articles you have written and is a gold mine although I have posterior pelvic tilt.

The Robertson article is great. I would also recommend the Thomas test to determine which of your hip flexors is the major contributor to the APT. That way, you know what to stretch. If you aren’t assessing, you are guessing. The trainer I’m most familiar with actually wrote a really good article recently on APT. Surprisingly, it’s for a fat loss website because he is writing a fat loss book. I don’t know how APT relates to fat loss (other than him saying that posture is a limiting factor to fat loss programming), but the article is great nonetheless. thetheoryoffatloss.blogspot.com/2010/10/anterior-pelvic-tilt-postural-limits.html