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Antagonist Training?

This is a really basic question.

I’ve started the Chad Waterbury’s Total Body Training, http://www.T-Nation.com/readTopic.do?id=508031

He defines antagonistic training like this: “antagonist training is simple; all you have to do is perform three antagonist exercise groupings during each workout. For instance, perform quads/hams, chest/back, and biceps/triceps exercise pairings for the recommended sets and reps.”

My question is what are the other antagonistic groupings? What is the antagonistic pair for “lower back/hips” (i.e. what do I do along with deadlifts)? Or for deltoids?

Thanks for the help, I apriciate your taking the time to help this newbie out.

Well, the abs could be considered the antagonist of the lower back. But not really. And the rotator cuff could be considered the antagonist of the deltoids. But again, not really.

Hey, why not pair the lower back with the deltoids and kill two birds with one stone?
I like to pair my goodmornings with shrugs.

I don’t know how you train your deltoids, but say you’re doing lateral raises. The direct antagonist would be to get into a cable machine and pull down, from neck height to your legs. So you’re doing just the opposite of the lateral raises.

[quote]Wreckless wrote:
Well, the abs could be considered the antagonist of the lower back. But not really. And the rotator cuff could be considered the antagonist of the deltoids. But again, not really.

Hey, why not pair the lower back with the deltoids and kill two birds with one stone?
I like to pair my goodmornings with shrugs.
[/quote]

Thanks, I guess this is what I was guessing, it’s the “not really” part that made me stop and think (and post). I’ll probably pair lower back and deltoid as “antagonistic pairs” for the purposes of this workout like you suggest. Thanks again.

You’ve got it all wrong. Don’t think in terms of muscles, but rather in terms of movements. Pushing is an antagonist to pulling. Both can be done in a variety of planes: vertical, horizontal and everything in between. When selecting your exercises, go at it that way instead.

[quote]Kailash wrote:
You’ve got it all wrong. Don’t think in terms of muscles, but rather in terms of movements. Pushing is an antagonist to pulling. Both can be done in a variety of planes: vertical, horizontal and everything in between. When selecting your exercises, go at it that way instead.[/quote]

You said it best.

[quote]Kailash wrote:
You’ve got it all wrong. Don’t think in terms of muscles, but rather in terms of movements. Pushing is an antagonist to pulling. Both can be done in a variety of planes: vertical, horizontal and everything in between. When selecting your exercises, go at it that way instead.[/quote]

Thanks. Given these parameters, what is then the antagonistic for deadlifts? Again thanks.

[quote]bikemike wrote:
I don’t know how you train your deltoids, but say you’re doing lateral raises. The direct antagonist would be to get into a cable machine and pull down, from neck height to your legs. So you’re doing just the opposite of the lateral raises.[/quote]

Thanks.

This antagonist idea isn’t perfect, especially in the lower body. In pushing/pulling it can aid recovery but in the LB it can only help manage fatigue.

So maybe do squat-biceps, bench-rows (antagonist) and dl-tris for your 6 exercises.

Use antagonists if available and use any isolation exercises you use as the completing part of the big leg exercises (squat/dl).