T Nation

Antagonist Movements: Hanging Triple Flexion

Consider the following antagonist movements:

Superior Axial Pull <> Push
example: Chins vs Military Press

Inferior Axial Pull <> Push
example: Clean vs Dips

Anteroposterial or Horisontal Pull <> Push
example: Row vs Bench Press

Quad dominant vs Hip dominant (quadruple extension) vs Anterior chain flexion (quadruple flex)
example: Squat vs Deadlift vs Tuck leg lift

Question:
To the squat and deadlift I want to add a “tuck lift” or “toe db lift”, sort of a hanging leg raise but with “tucked in” legs, also to be considered as an inverted squat. I have found this exercise to work very well for me and it feels very healthy. I prefer this one over “Hanging leg raise with straigth legs”. It activates tibialis, hip flexors, abs and theoretically the lower hamstring.

Also, the movement is “functional” as it occurs during sprint running, and pulling toe up from very cold water… :slight_smile:

Also, presses and pulls are preferred over raises (e.g. dumbbell flies), and this tucked in leg lift seems to allow for more load than the “straight leg” version.

What do you think? Isn’t this the missing 3rd link for a complete perspective of squat / deadlift antagonism?

I like how you’re thinking.
What is your plan to support/brace the upper body…my first thought is that stability will be the limit long before strength is challanged.

[quote]Stefan T wrote:
Consider the following antagonist movements:

Superior Axial Pull <> Push
example: Chins vs Military Press

Inferior Axial Pull <> Push
example: Clean vs Dips

Anteroposterial or Horisontal Pull <> Push
example: Row vs Bench Press

Quad dominant vs Hip dominant (quadruple extension) vs Anterior chain flexion (quadruple flex)
example: Squat vs Deadlift vs Tuck leg lift

Question:
To the squat and deadlift I want to add a “tuck lift” or “toe db lift”, sort of a hanging leg raise but with “tucked in” legs, also to be considered as an inverted squat. I have found this exercise to work very well for me and it feels very healthy. I prefer this one over “Hanging leg raise with straigth legs”. It activates tibialis, hip flexors, abs and theoretically the lower hamstring.

Also, the movement is “functional” as it occurs during sprint running, and pulling toe up from very cold water… :slight_smile:

Also, presses and pulls are preferred over raises (e.g. dumbbell flies), and this tucked in leg lift seems to allow for more load than the “straight leg” version.

What do you think? Isn’t this the missing 3rd link for a complete perspective of squat / deadlift antagonism?[/quote]

This is going to sound real stupid, but can you explain this tuck leg lift?

I think I get what you mean, and I’m probably going to answer my own question, but do you mean a hanging leg raise but having your legs flexed at the knee and doing leg raises?

If I’m right, I always do a few of these when I do pullups, they feel pretty good.

Even better is if you do that, hold you legs in the top position and do pull ups, almost like a fetal position pullup.

Likely the closest true antagonist to a squat or deadlift would be to use inversion boots but instead of just doing a sit-up try to pull yourself to the boot so there would be active ankle dorsiflexion, knee flexion, hip flexion, and trunk flexion, the opposite of what is happening in those lifts. This is very hard to perform well, BTW, but just throwing it out there since you asked the question

Your idea is likely good too if you could get enough trunk flexion and enough resistance on your feet without one small thing holding you back

This post was flagged by the community and is temporarily hidden.