T Nation

Another 'Stunted Growth' Thread


#1

Okay sorry to bring this thread back, but I absolutely had to considering what my mother told me today. So I got home from the gym today and I was making my PWO shake. She was bitching about my protein intake being too high (Really? 200-250g is too much for someone who's 180 some-odd pounds?) and she was saying that the reason I'm short is partially my fault because I lift heavy a lot of the time.

She said when I'm lifting, my test levels go through the roof and that's causing my growth plates to harden and close up which is why I'm 5'7". I have a couple of problems with this:

1) She's 5'2" and my dad's 6'1", so it's mostly her shitty genetics.
2) I'm almost positive that test levels are really low after you're done lifting?
3) She's a nurse, so she thinks she knows everything (even though this sounds incredibly stupid to say).

So what the fuck is going on here?

Luke


#2

First off, how old are you?


#3

[quote]CSEagles1694 wrote:
Okay sorry to bring this thread back, but I absolutely had to considering what my mother told me today. So I got home from the gym today and I was making my PWO shake. She was bitching about my protein intake being too high (Really? 200-250g is too much for someone who’s 180 some-odd pounds?) and she was saying that the reason I’m short is partially my fault because I lift heavy a lot of the time.

She said when I’m lifting, my test levels go through the roof and that’s causing my growth plates to harden and close up which is why I’m 5’7". I have a couple of problems with this:

  1. She’s 5’2" and my dad’s 6’1", so it’s mostly her shitty genetics.
  2. I’m almost positive that test levels are really low after you’re done lifting?
  3. She’s a nurse, so she thinks she knows everything (even though this sounds incredibly stupid to say).

So what the fuck is going on here?

Luke[/quote]

Your growth plates keep growing… until you are done growing. While you are growing, lifting heavy weights stimulates the release of tons of hormones that stimulate growth. Like Growth Hormone and Testosterone. Wolf’s Law of Bone Growth says bone will bend under heavy loads. This bend stimulates osteocyces. Osteocystes collect on the surface of bones to make your bones bigger.

I don’t mean to be an asshole here but, a nurse giving strength/size develpment advice is like going to the dentist to ask advice about a shitting problem. Doesn’t make a whole lot of sense because that is not the area they specialize in.

Just keep lifting. Go on Ultimate Athlete Concepts website and get Yessis’s book “Training for Height.” Yes, it is a book on how to train to get taller.


#4

Your growth is not stunted. My case is similar as my mother is 5’6 and father is 6’2 while I’m 5’8 at 17 years old (been this height the entire length of my high school career). If your not malnourished (I’ve seen kids that fit this category and still turn out pretty tall) or intaking large quantities of synthetic hormones, then there is nothing to worry about. If you grow later, then you grow later; if not, so be it. Genetics can be like that sometimes.


#5

Wow, your mother must have lifted really really heavy growing up huh?


#6

Here’s the deal, the longer growth plates remain open the more time you have until you stop growing forever - which is what ur mom is worried about. If you ain’t malnourished (250g is plenty) you have nothing to worry about, unless you take it to the last extreme and almost die of physical exhaustion. Testosterone closes growth plates via aromatase, but like I said the increase from training isn’t gonna take any inches from you. And nor will it give you any, so keep your hopes down.


#7

Lifting does not stunt your growth.
If you don’t believe me ^ read the above until you do.
/end thread.


#8

[quote]TRTblastcruise wrote:
First off, how old are you?[/quote]

I’m 16.

To everybody else, thanks for all your input. I’ve come across other threads similar to this and am glad to know that it’s not my fault I’m short haha. I’m just gonna keep doing what I have been.

Personally, I don’t care too much how tall I get. As long as I can out bench, squat, and deadlift just about everybody there is, I’m perfectly content with my height. Thanks again.

Luke


#9

Its a tough battle with moms luke . Best thing is to stand your ground politely. Moms operate out of fear. Just the way they are. If your protein lags, at least keep your calories up .

I have a few theories . 1. Moms operate out of fear for your safety .

  1. Gals get jealous of the amount of food a teenage lifter can eat . It’s a different universe . They just don’t get it.

So be nice, and do as much as you can.
.


#10

Remember, being short is often an advantage in powerlifting. That’s why I had 3" removed from my femurs.


#11

[quote]tom63 wrote:
Its a tough battle with moms luke . Best thing is to stand your ground politely. Moms operate out of fear. Just the way they are. If your protein lags, at least keep your calories up .

I have a few theories . 1. Moms operate out of fear for your safety .

  1. Gals get jealous of the amount of food a teenage lifter can eat . It’s a different universe . They just don’t get it.

So be nice, and do as much as you can.
.[/quote]

This is pretty spot on. Through my teens my mother constantly worried about my lifting, protein intake, etc. Now, as I am turning 40, she still constantly worries about my lifting:“when are you going to stop lifting so heavy?” she says almost everytime the subject comes up.

But I also found out that she brags about my numbers, and my meets, to her friends:)


#12

It’s what they do, haha! Now I have a wife for that. When I finally fled 605 three weeks ago she asked me what now?

I told her 700. She laughed and said she figured as much , haha . Moms are just looking out for you. Maybe Luke can round up a weight training doc or something to help out.

[quote]PeteS wrote:

[quote]tom63 wrote:
Its a tough battle with moms luke . Best thing is to stand your ground politely. Moms operate out of fear. Just the way they are. If your protein lags, at least keep your calories up .

I have a few theories . 1. Moms operate out of fear for your safety .

  1. Gals get jealous of the amount of food a teenage lifter can eat . It’s a different universe . They just don’t get it.

So be nice, and do as much as you can.
.[/quote]

This is pretty spot on. Through my teens my mother constantly worried about my lifting, protein intake, etc. Now, as I am turning 40, she still constantly worries about my lifting:“when are you going to stop lifting so heavy?” she says almost everytime the subject comes up.

But I also found out that she brags about my numbers, and my meets, to her friends:) [/quote]


#13

I echo the sentiments above.

At the end of your day your mom is just in ‘protective’ mode and is operating under things that were spoken as if they were truth when she was a kid. What she is saying is nothing new. In fact, it’s old as dirt.

I would state most of us on this forum got our first Sears cement weight set when we were between the ages of 10-12 and have all turned out ok. I would never blame my being vertically challenged on weight training. It’s just the cards I was dealt.

IRT your protein intake, my kids have been drinking protein shakes fairly regularly since they were young and they both drink a shake a day now. It’s just part of what they do. My 14 yo daughter is now as tall as I am, and I am confident my son will tower over me one day (not that that’s much of an accomplishment).

Most of the damage I did to my body I did at your age because I was a dumbass and overtrained big time Early on we got most of our programming from Muscle and Fiction so I was doing Albert Beckles bicep routine with my spindly ass rope arms and Lee Labrada’s chest routine at a time in my life when if I turned sideways, I disappeared.

The advantage you have is the wealth of training resources available to you. The challenge you have is sorting it out and not jumping from program to program like a spastic meth head.

Not to mention, most of us old guys would give away something dear to us to have your endogenous levels of T.