T Nation

Androgenic Side Effects - Confusing

Hey guys I’m trying to get a firmer grasp on the rather confusing subject of Male Pattern Baldness and where androgens fit in…

I see it commonly asserted on a lot of forums and articles written by steroid users that DHT derivatives are the worst offenders for hair loss because “they’re DHT”. However, if my interpretation of the information is correct, this is not in any shape or form true.

For example, masteron and anavar are both DHT derived steroids. Yet masteron has a reputation for hair loss in those prone, anavar however is regarded as a much “safer” drug. The fact that they are both derived from DHT means, seemingly, nothing at all. They are no longer DHT, just as DHT is no longer acting like its parent hormone testosterone.

Secondly, looking at the medical guidelines on masteron for breast cancer treatment in woman, masteron is regarded as less virilizing than equal dosages of testosterone propionate, which ultimately I think means its less potent than DHT… Or, it doesnt exhibit as much interaction with the AR in certain tissues. (from memory I think DHT is much more active in the brain/CNS, and testes than it is in other tissues??)

So I guess what I’m asking is experiences or thoughts from guys who have run the compounds commonly demonized alone, or otherwise with very low total dosages of testosterone.

Estrogen and progestin compounds much worse for hair loss.

High DHT = bad, High DHT while on weird and extremely potent estrogens = more positive downregulation of estrogenic effects (which leads to me to believe, primarily estrogenic effects, are the main component of hair loss.)

[quote]Westclock wrote:
Estrogen and progestin compounds much worse for hair loss.

High DHT = bad, High DHT while on weird and extremely potent estrogens = more positive downregulation of estrogenic effects (which leads to me to believe, primarily estrogenic effects, are the main component of hair loss.)[/quote]

why’s that?

We don’t see any incidence of hairloss in people born with 5-aR deficiency and much less in women etc.

I was under the understanding estrogen was actually of a positive role in hair health. I know low SHBG is a risk factor in MPB at the very least, a lot of guys with aggressive MPB have high DHT and very low SHBG.

I don’t know this shit is confusing. I guess what I was trying to ask is if its possible some of these androgens have been demonized wrongly (such as masteron) because people are often running them in conjunction with huge dosages of testosterone and then blaming the other compound when they start to see hair loss which usually isnt a process that happens overnight.

[quote]Aussie Davo wrote:

We don’t see any incidence of hairloss in people born with 5-aR deficiency and much less in women etc.

[/quote]

You also don’t see any incidence of hairloss in young men who are absolutely chock full of DHT. They are literally swimming in the stuff, but don’t start losing their hair until they get a bit older where it is established that estrogen levels rise.

I’m not saying E2 is the direct cause, but it certainly plays a roll IMO. Maybe the presence of both DHT and E2? I’ve also seen it proposed that it is due to lack of metabolism which doesn’t allow the hair to be regenerated due to the slowed nutrient turnover. That is beyond my understanding (or interest level) though.

Extreme estrogen levels from cycles of aromatizing compounds are responsible for a majority of steroid sides, hairloss included.

The body, male body, would never experience these levels of female hormones in its normal exsistance without assistance.

If you are going to be bald eventually and there is nothing “broken” in your system to begin with; Gear always speeds up hair loss, progestin, test, DHT, any compound seems to be detrimental to the hair line.

DHT and DHT compounds is more often a protector from than cause of sideeffects. The use of drugs that inhibit the action of DHT is why you see alot of guys with completely broken systems. Remember DHT is the primary masculine hormone in most body tissue.