T Nation

Anabolic Resistance?


#1

Has anyone experienced anabolic resistance whereby most of the calories consumed gets converted to fat instead of muscle?

I am worried that bulking will have an impact on my strength/muscle gains according to one of the T Nation article.


#2

I generally found that, when that happened, it was because I was not actually working hard enough to justify the calories consumed. I either upped the intensity or ate less.


#3

Anabolic resistance, is this a thing now?

Edit: I suppose it is: https://www.T-Nation.com/diet-fat-loss/anabolic-resistance-how-mass-diets-can-hurt-you

Interesting, this is one of the few articles I found outside of age-related sarcopenia: http://www.hindawi.com/journals/tswj/2012/269531/


#4

[quote]Sweetcries wrote:
Has anyone experienced anabolic resistance whereby most of the calories consumed gets converted to fat instead of muscle?[/quote]
I’m guessing you think you did last year, but you didn’t though.


Have you really been worrying about this for the last six months?

Are you still around 20% bodyfat? If anything, that’s having more of an influence on your muscle gains during a “bulk”. Strength progress would have more to do with your actual training program.

How tall are you?

What’s your current weight and general fat level?

What are your current maxes in the basic lifts?

Based on all of your previous threads, I think your training and diet need serious improvement, and have probably needed fixing for a while. It has nothing to do with your CNS, nothing to do with Anabolic Resistance, and nothing to do with a lack of sleep.


#5

It’s completely normal for a person to be able to eat only so much before the excess yields fat gain. It’s not anabolic resistance, but rather normal human metabolism, unless this occurring at a still-low caloric intake.

You mentioned in another thread weighing 75 kg. How many calories a day are you eating?

Another thing to keep in mind is that even for a beginner, for example 1 lb of muscle gain per week is outstanding, and even 1 lb per month would add up to real progress. You can’t expect your scale weight to be exploding. If you’re eating to a point of forcing the scale to go up faster than realistic muscle gain, then definitely the excess will be fat.