T Nation

An Orgasm In My Mouth (Spicy Food)

When I eat spicy food, I experience a very intense sensation somewhere in my head. It’s above the palate, somewhere around the sinuses I guess. It is, apparently, quite pleasurable, because I am compelled to eat more in order to keep it going. It only gets better as the fire in my mouth grows. Jalapenos always set it off.

Has anyone experience something similar? Any clue as to what’s going on? I know that spicy foods cause endorphin release, but what I experience is a physical sensation beyond any chemically induced euphoria. It’s really unlike anything else I’ve experienced.

This is why you have no friends.

Next time I see a thread entitled “Orgasm in my mouth”, it had better be in the “Sex and the Male Animal” Forum.

P.S.

As far as Spicy Foods go:

NO SOUP FOR YOU!

WolBarret

Uh…thanks. Or not.

[quote]wfifer wrote:
When I eat spicy food, I experience a very intense sensation somewhere in my head. It’s above the palate, somewhere around the sinuses I guess. It is, apparently, quite pleasurable, because I am compelled to eat more in order to keep it going. It only gets better as the fire in my mouth grows. Jalapenos always set it off.

Has anyone experience something similar? Any clue as to what’s going on? I know that spicy foods cause endorphin release, but what I experience is a physical sensation beyond any chemically induced euphoria. It’s really unlike anything else I’ve experienced. [/quote]

Peppers contain a chemical alkaloid called capsaicin which is responsible for what makes it spicy on the palate.

Plus, Oprah says…

Capsaicin’s Health Benefits
Headache help: Substance P is the key transmitter of pain to the brain. In fact, Substance P is the body’s main mechanism for producing swelling and pain throughout the trigeminal nerve, which runs through the head, temple, and sinus cavity. When the nerve fibers come in contact with Substance P, they react by swelling?an effect that yields headaches and sinus symptoms. Clinical studies have shown that capsaicin, a compound in hot peppers, is extremely effective for relieving and preventing cluster headaches, migraine headaches, and sinus headaches.

Arthritis relief: People suffering from arthritis pain typically have elevated levels of Substance P in their blood and in the synovial fluid that bathes their joints. Research has shown that eating foods that contain capsaicin or applying a topical cream that contains capsaicin can suppress Substance P production.

Capsaiscin as spicy sinus soother: Capsaicin also possesses powerful antibacterial properties, and is very effective in fighting and preventing chronic sinus infections (sinusitis). This purely natural chemical will also clear out congested nasal passages like nothing else, and is helpful in treating sinus-related allergy symptoms. Small daily doses of capsaicin have even been shown to prevent chronic nasal congestion.

Capsaicin as anti-inflammatory: In recent years, researchers discovered that capsaicin is a potent anti-inflammatory, and have even pinpointed how it works to fight chronic, sub-clinical inflammation. The nuclei of human cells contain chemicals called nuclear transcription factors (NTFs), two of which?activator protein 1 (AP-1) and NF-kappa B?are especially important targets when it comes to prevention of cancer and premature aging of skin. Each of these NTFs can be “activated” by ultraviolet light and free radicals: a result that produces a pro-inflammatory chain reaction that promotes premature aging and a wide variety of degenerative diseases. As it turns out, nature offers several effective NTF-activation blockers, including the capsaicin in chilies, and the yellow pigment curcumin in turmeric.

Gastric relief: A recent study on gastric disorders at Duke University showed capsaicin may actually lead to a cure for certain intestinal diseases. The Duke team found that a specific nerve cell receptor appears to be necessary to initiate the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a general term given to a variety of chronic disorders in which the intestine becomes inflamed?resulting in recurring abdominal cramps, pain and diarrhea. The cause of IBD is unknown, and it is believed that up to 2 million Americans suffer from this disorder.

Capsaicin versus cancer: Several recent studies have shown that capsaicin may actually prevent the growth of certain types of cancer. In particular, there have been several clinical studies conducted in Japan and China that showed natural capsaicin directly inhibits the growth of leukemic cells. Although these studies used pure capsaicin directly injected into isolated diseased cells in a laboratory setting, scientists have also concluded that daily consumption of hot peppers (thus capsaicin) may actually prevent certain types of cancer. Throughout South America, intestinal, stomach, and colon cancer rates are very low compared to the United States. It is widely regarded by medical experts that this low cancer rate may be tied to the large amounts of capsaicin in their diets, since nearly every main dish in their normal diet contains some form of capsaicin-based food, particularly hot cayenne and jalape?o peppers. Of course we must also take into consideration the fact these cultures also consume fiber-rich beans on a daily basis.

Capsaicin as fat burner: Capsaicin is an active ingredient in many of the most popular “fat burning” supplements on the market. A thermogenic agent, capsaicin helps to increase overall metabolic activity, thus helping the body burn calories and fat. Since the FDA banned the herb ephedra, supplement manufacturers have been searching for new thermogenic ingredients and many have added chilies to the mix. While capsaicin replaces some of ephedra’s metabolic effects, it doesn’t have that herb’s negative, stimulant effects on heart rate. In fact, capsaicin is an actively “heart healthy” supplement.

[quote]wfifer wrote:
It is, apparently, quite pleasurable, because I am compelled to eat more in order to keep it going. It only gets better as the fire in my mouth grows. Jalapenos always set it off.
[/quote]

Do you find your mouth strangely filled with cream afterwards? Maybe they’re not Jalapenos.

;).

best title for a thread ever

[quote]wfifer wrote:
Has anyone experience something similar? [/quote]

Can’t say that I’ve ever experienced an orgasm in your mouth.

Wow, this got some…interesting responses.

I know it sounds really strange. It’s not masochism or anything; it’s not sexual pleasure. But it is a pulsating sensation in my head, especially above the palate.

Over the weekend I had some Utz red hot potato chips (which are awesome, by the way), and if my mouth could have somehow ejaculated I think it would have.

I honestly don’t see how capsaicin could cause this. The only thing remotely pertinent is that it can cause the release of endorphins. Well, endorphins don’t cause the sensation I’m describing. And clearly the fact that nobody knows what the hell I’m talking about indicates that there’s something exceptional about it.

I mean, fuck, if I try googling any of this stuff, this thread pops up on the first page!