T Nation

Amino Acid Supplementation

In Europe Amino Acid Supplementation is very common. You can buy amino acid liquids, tablets and capsules.

I know that amino liquids are not the best choice because the body cannot really use the collagen aminos.

And it is said that amino tablets are nearly useless because they have to use a binder to create the hard tabs and the body cannot digest it.

Please correct me if i am wrong.

Does it make any sense to you to supplement with amino acid capsules?
I thought about taking servings pre workout and take capsules to my meals. Recently i found an article which says that this kind of supplementation is only popular in europe not in the us. Actually some of the most popular brands like Biotest, BSN do not produce any amino acid capsules…

What is your opinion?

Should i stick to my Protein-shake and my BCAAs or does it make sence to supplement with those AAs?

Tablets are fine, as are powders. Never been a fan of the liquids just because they usually taste nasty.

BCAA are best used peri-workout. You will get the best bang out of them during and post workout.

And for the record, Biotest’s only BCAA product is in tablet form.

I love amino acids. Take as many as you can! lol

I second Analog-kid. I take up to 40-50mg of BCAA split pre-peri-post workout. Then have a protein/carb shake with some creatine and other goodies and your body ‘should’ be in some sort of Anabolic state.

Food is more anabolic than anything, go home and eat a big meal, then rest for a few hours.

Then repeat and reap the rewards. lol

To answer your question…I’ve taken every form out there, I find the powders to give me the best results. I’ve never had a full BCAA tab come out in my stool, so as far as I know the body is doing something with it. The liquid, although usually nasty, probably isn’t that bad assuming the amino’s don’t go bad suspended in a liquid state as many things do.

DG

Amino acids are stable in aqueous solution. No problem there.

The taste problem results either from really awful products that just have not been updated over the years – I am thinking in particular of a cherry-named product from a generally-high-quality supplement company that apparently has never improved past its I-think 1980’s formulation – or is a fairly simple bitterness that results from the inherent nature of certain amino acids, particularly the BCAA’s.

[quote]Bill Roberts wrote:
Amino acids are stable in aqueous solution. No problem there.

The taste problem results either from really awful products that just have not been updated over the years – I am thinking in particular of a cherry-named product from a generally-high-quality supplement company that apparently has never improved past its I-think 1980’s formulation – or is a fairly simple bitterness that results from the inherent nature of certain amino acids, particularly the BCAA’s.[/quote]

It could be the particular brand that I use, but since I started splitting up my BCAA I’ve noticed that Leucine seems to be the worst as far as taste goes.

Also I’m sure your tired of hearing it, but I appreciate your time here Bill. I have learned a lot just recently from your posts.

DG

Thanks, DG! I’m glad if it is of any help.

I used to make use of the tablets, but it was just such a pain in the ass, and I often found myself burping up capsules. Presently, I mix about 3 scoops of Optimum BCAA powder (about 15g) with some crystal light sugar free mix, and just sip it throughout my session. PWO, I slam some Whey, with creatine, and either a spoon of PB, or Poptart depending on if I’m eating carbs or not.

S

THX for ya hints. Glad to know i am on the right path.

so i continue using BCAA Powder and Caps and Aminos Tabs and Caps.

The all seem to work perfektly. Think i just read an stupid article.

Conclusion : BCAA(Caps or Powder) before and during workout - Aminos(Tabs or Caps) throughout the day and after workout.

This post was flagged by the community and is temporarily hidden.

There was nothing wrong with the dnbjoe’s statement.

With reference to consumption in any large quantities and in reference to aiding muscle, or with reference to any purpose usually intended with BCAA’s, collagen indeed is not the best source of aminos because the amino acid profile is not the best for aiding muscle, being low in BCAA’s and having quite useless, for that purpose, amounts of glycine, proline, and hydroxyproline, to the point of ridiculousness.

Probably a good amino acid composition for aiding cartilage, skin, and finger and toe nails, but hardly ideal for muscle in larger quantities. Nowhere near even close.

Interestingly though in small quantities it can enhance biological value of meat protein if that meat is at the lower end of the spectrum in collagen content. It’s possible that this is where you observed your benefit.

But this is a different thing than what is ordinarily intended from BCAA supplementation, and so does not invalidate dnbjoe’s statement.

By the way, a cheaper and much non-nasty way of getting essentially the same amino acid profile as hydrolyzed collagen is to buy plain gelatin packets.

This post was flagged by the community and is temporarily hidden.

[quote]Mick28 wrote:

And none of what you’ve stated invalidates my own personal experience. I’ve used such supplements for many years and have gotten stronger and larger on them. So, I reiterate…bullshit.

[/quote]

Might wanna switch to decaf there bro -lol

S

[quote]Mick28 wrote:
Bill Roberts wrote:
There was nothing wrong with the dnbjoe’s statement.

With reference to consumption in any large quantities and in reference to aiding muscle, or with reference to any purpose usually intended with BCAA’s, collagen indeed is not the best source of aminos because the amino acid profile is not the best for aiding muscle,

being low in BCAA’s and having quite useless, for that purpose, amounts of glycine, proline, and hydroxyproline, to the point of ridiculousness.

Probably a good amino acid composition for aiding cartilage, skin, and finger and toe nails, but hardly ideal for muscle in larger quantities. Nowhere near even close.

Interestingly though in small quantities it can enhance biological value of meat protein if that meat is at the lower end of the spectrum in collagen content. It’s possible that this is where you observed your benefit.

But this is a different thing than what is ordinarily intended from BCAA supplementation, and so does not invalidate dnbjoe’s statement.

By the way, a cheaper and much non-nasty way of getting essentially the same amino acid profile as hydrolyzed collagen is to buy plain gelatin packets.

And none of what you’ve stated invalidates my own personal experience. I’ve used such supplements for many years and have gotten stronger and larger on them. So, I reiterate…bullshit.

[/quote]

Ignorance is bliss!

This post was flagged by the community and is temporarily hidden.

[quote]Mick28 wrote:

Ignorance is bliss!

Hey there dip shit…are you telling me what has or has not worked for me?

Ha ha…

[/quote]

No, I was implying that you don’t know what exactly has worked for you.

After all, liquid collagen isn’t going to build muscle or serve as an effective ergogenic aid.

[quote]Mick28 wrote:
Bill Roberts wrote:
There was nothing wrong with the dnbjoe’s statement.

With reference to consumption in any large quantities and in reference to aiding muscle, or with reference to any purpose usually intended with BCAA’s, collagen indeed is not the best source of aminos because the amino acid profile is not the best for aiding muscle,

being low in BCAA’s and having quite useless, for that purpose, amounts of glycine, proline, and hydroxyproline, to the point of ridiculousness.

Probably a good amino acid composition for aiding cartilage, skin, and finger and toe nails, but hardly ideal for muscle in larger quantities. Nowhere near even close.

Interestingly though in small quantities it can enhance biological value of meat protein if that meat is at the lower end of the spectrum in collagen content. It’s possible that this is where you observed your benefit.

But this is a different thing than what is ordinarily intended from BCAA supplementation, and so does not invalidate dnbjoe’s statement.

By the way, a cheaper and much non-nasty way of getting essentially the same amino acid profile as hydrolyzed collagen is to buy plain gelatin packets.

And none of what you’ve stated invalidates my own personal experience. I’ve used such supplements for many years and have gotten stronger and larger on them. So, I reiterate…bullshit.

[/quote]

you seem to be full of what your reiterating. What works for you may not work for another. Your aminos might not be working as well as other forms of aminos. You might be making gains for many years because of the food you eat and the way you train. It could be your other supplements as well.

I’m not calling you a liar, but I am stating that unless you’ve been consuming nothing but those aminos as a supplement and never grew without the addition to them, that your view on the topic is askewed.

DG

[quote]Mick28 wrote:
Bill Roberts wrote:
There was nothing wrong with the dnbjoe’s statement.

With reference to consumption in any large quantities and in reference to aiding muscle, or with reference to any purpose usually intended with BCAA’s, collagen indeed is not the best source of aminos because the amino acid profile is not the best for aiding muscle,

being low in BCAA’s and having quite useless, for that purpose, amounts of glycine, proline, and hydroxyproline, to the point of ridiculousness.

Probably a good amino acid composition for aiding cartilage, skin, and finger and toe nails, but hardly ideal for muscle in larger quantities. Nowhere near even close.

Interestingly though in small quantities it can enhance biological value of meat protein if that meat is at the lower end of the spectrum in collagen content. It’s possible that this is where you observed your benefit.

But this is a different thing than what is ordinarily intended from BCAA supplementation, and so does not invalidate dnbjoe’s statement.

By the way, a cheaper and much non-nasty way of getting essentially the same amino acid profile as hydrolyzed collagen is to buy plain gelatin packets.

And none of what you’ve stated invalidates my own personal experience. I’ve used such supplements for many years and have gotten stronger and larger on them. So, I reiterate…bullshit.

[/quote]

Too bad you can’t tell where the “bullshit” really lies, and are so closed-minded that anything you can’t understand is “bullshit” to you and you so thoroughly lack a brain/mouth (or brain/hand) filter that you can’t keep comments like that to yourself.

And it’s too bad that you don’t have the manners of a decent human being. Some don’t. Those that don’t, aren’t worth anyone’s time.

Perhaps you need to gain some reading comprehension skills. So long as those are lacking, you’re wasting your time reading what anyone writes. I certainly am not going to waste my time responding further than this to someone that obviously can’t comprehend.

[quote]HK24719 wrote:
Mick28 wrote:

Ignorance is bliss!

Hey there dip shit…are you telling me what has or has not worked for me?

Ha ha…

No, I was implying that you don’t know what exactly has worked for you.

After all, liquid collagen isn’t going to build muscle or serve as an effective ergogenic aid.[/quote]

If the poster in question had been able to actually comprehend plain and direct statements, he would have understood that it stated plainly that while liquid collagen is next to useless for doing the tasks BCAA’s are used for due to being very low in BCAA’s, and also next to useless as a source of protein in its own right (it has exceedinly poor biological value) some amount of collagen protein in fact increases the biological value of meat protein.

It’s not a drastic such effect, but if someone gets most of their protein from meat it could be worth having. Though I think plain gelatin packets are a better approach.

So in fact, though the 15-watt-anti-bug-light acumen of the person objecting wasn’t able to pick up on it, nowhere did I say he could not have actually gotten a benefit. In fact I wrote it where I stipulated that he did, politely, which obviously was wasted.

Of course you are right that it’s at least as likely that he is incorrect in attributing the cause of whatever good results he observed. Probably much more likely, really. I thought it more civil to not point that out to him, but civility was obviously wasted on that individual.

Sometimes it is. No need to continue something so obviously unappreciated and unreturned, though.

Maybe if it is in bold he will read it this time.

We appreciate you Bill! :slight_smile:

S