T Nation

Amino Acid Rich Foods

[quote]The_Grim_Reaper wrote:
What a load of B.S. Soy isn’t bad for you. Japan has sued it for over a thousand years and are the longest living race in the world! Those soy studies are funded by the emat and dairy industry,look ,you’ll see.Why?Because the meat industry losing millions each year due to soy being sold. I’ve always drank soy ,my whole life;and I’m living proof,so are my friends,and japan,that it doesn’t cause health problems. There are no such thing as anti_nutrients that “block” amino acids.Soy has amino acids.If it "blocked amino acids,people wouldn’t be able to digest the amino acids when they mix with stomach acids. the only study done on soy was when it was in baby food.They took certain phytochemicals out of the soy,and the babies were fed no iodine. Well,if you get no iodine then no shit you’re gonna have thyroid trouble.but,japan who eats it everyday,too much of it that is,has 63 % less thyroid problems than america does! Thats a fact.[/quote]

Look up protease inhibitors. Look up saponins. Sheesh, google anti-nutrients go to the first link. Don’t hold strong opinions about things you don’t understand.

RB

[quote]rubberbubba wrote:

Sheesh. And I thought I was done with grad school.

OK. Here you go.

Liener IE, Kakade, ML. Protease Inhibitors. In Irvin E. Liener, ed. Toxic Constituents of Plant Foodstuffs (NY, Academic Press, Second edition, 1980) 49,55.[/quote]
Maybe you should go back to school and understand the term “peer reviewed research” rather than a book?

but seeing as you are meaning a trypsin inhibitor, something most legumes (including peanuts) and vegetables in general have, not just soya

Now show us the amino acid uptake compared with casein (which also has trypsin inhibitor activity, just not quite as much as vegetable sources). Usually a higher percentage of soy amino acid (from soya meal, not isolate) appears in portal circulation…

[quote]
And no, I don’t think you’v proven there’s methionone in the thing just because the government says so. Read about food politics and understand how the world beyond your university really works. Why don’t you show me some peer reviewed work that states it does have it.[/quote]
a government consipracy is why they show methionine in beans? do you wrap you head in tinfoil as well?
here goes one, there are others but this was the first one outta my box.

Arch Latinoam Nutr. 1978 Jun;28(2):155-68. Related Articles, Links

Production and nutritive value of soybeans.

Lam-Sanchez A.

Soybean world production has been increasing at a rate of 5.2% per year (average yield is around 1,400 kg/ha). This production has been solely used for oil extraction and the protein meal obtained for animal rations, but lately it is being used for human consumption. Brazil, the third largest producer, has had a yearly rate of production increase of 32% in the last years. Average yields in Brazil are still low (around 1,500 kg/ha), but in experimental results, yields over 3,000 kg/ha have been obtained. Some problems needstill to be solved, such as obtention of adapted varieties, soil fertility, adequate agronomic practices, damage by insects and diseases. Protein and oil contents are highly negative correlated, they are genetically controlled and can also be influenced by environmental conditions and agronomic practices. To breed for high protein (above 48%) enhances a decrease in oil and yield, but new varieties containing 43% protein and with a good yielding capacity have been developed lately. Methionine content varies from 1.0 to 1.6% g/16g N; there is a correlation of 0.56 to 0.58 between methionine in the protein and protein in the seed. Particular attention has been given to toxic factors such as trypsin inhibitors, whose action is related to the availability or utilization of methionine; this effect, however, can be eliminated by heat.

[quote]rubberbubba wrote:

Look up protease inhibitors. Look up saponins. Sheesh, google anti-nutrients go to the first link. Don’t hold strong opinions about things you don’t understand.

RB
[/quote]

better not eat cabbage, or brocolli, omg they contain trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitors… OMG it will kill you.

Quick, wrap you head in tinfoil…

[quote]cycomiko wrote:
rubberbubba wrote:

Look up protease inhibitors. Look up saponins. Sheesh, google anti-nutrients go to the first link. Don’t hold strong opinions about things you don’t understand.

RB

better not eat cabbage, or brocolli, omg they contain trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitors… OMG it will kill you.

Quick, wrap you head in tinfoil…[/quote]

I like my tinfoil hat. It makes me look smart like you…

OK. There’s no conspiracy. There is however government contracting. Government contracting insures that the labs that perform the testing for the government are the lowest bidder. I read somewhere, and I’ll find it for you, that the incidence of error made by those labs is higher than you would expect.

Also, I reread, while on the plane, the information that led me to believe that there was no methionine. There is. You were right. However, there is very little. See, the difference between you scientist types and us engineer types is that we think practically. If the amount of methionine is negligible, which it is, then we would consider to have none.

Oh, and this particular post was in response to the guy that said there’s no such thing as anti-nutrients. There are, they’re in everything - BTW, that’s another engineering approximation meaning that they exist in so many foods that keeping track of which have them and which don’t would be a total waste of time unless I were trying to defend my PhD these in nutrition which I am not.

Would you like to discuss the shortcomings of PDCAAS or shall we continue to insult each other?

Remember that I do not have a research library at my disposal so I do the best I can. Defended articles are difficult for me to find without paying for them and I won’t be paying for them.

Thank you.