T Nation

Age Need Not Limit Us


#1

http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/news;_ylt=AhZOgniTMfxyqu5TTqzc5B9DubYF?slug=li-gault050109&prov=yhoo&type=lgns

Great story on former NFL receiver and world class sprinter Willie Gault.

Bodybuilders peak later than other athletes. If a sprinter can keep a high level of performance into his late 40's, what can a bodybuilder do?


#2

Well according to the thread I posted “Growing old the myth” many here won’t believe this. I totally do, at 52 I’m still flooring people with my abilities.

I started at 16 and never stopped. Never used any sport enhancing drugs. I eat well and train as smart as I can. I really want to see what I can do at 65 and beyond.

I think the worst thing one can do is give up. The second is to fuck up your body with enhancing drugs. To me it’s all about being the best I can be, for me not others.

Life at 52 is as sweet as it was at 20. Fact it’s better because I know a hell of a lot more about what works and what doesn’t.

The greatest thing is no one knows what the limits of the human body are. I’m going to find out. It’s a win win situation for me.


#3

Cool story.

“Whereas decreased aerobic capacity and muscle atrophy begins at 25 for most men”

Sad that this might actually be true for the general untrained population. What an awful scenario. I can’t imagine feeling I peaked physically at 25.


#4

[quote]streamline wrote:
Well according to the thread I posted “Growing old the myth” many here won’t believe this. I totally do, at 52 I’m still flooring people with my abilities.

I started at 16 and never stopped. Never used any sport enhancing drugs. I eat well and train as smart as I can. I really want to see what I can do at 65 and beyond.

I think the worst thing one can do is give up. The second is to fuck up your body with enhancing drugs. To me it’s all about being the best I can be, for me not others.

Life at 52 is as sweet as it was at 20. Fact it’s better because I know a hell of a lot more about what works and what doesn’t.

The greatest thing is no one knows what the limits of the human body are. I’m going to find out. It’s a win win situation for me.[/quote]

I appreciate your attitude. Folks like you motivate me.

I’m 41 and also feel like “growing old” is a myth. It’s about not being satisfied with “normal.” Does age eventually catch up? Sure…but we can all prolong the inevitable.


#5

Of course you can improve vastly over those that don’t take care of themselves.

But, you can’t deny that with age comes a decrease in ability to recover.


#6

[quote]jehovasfitness wrote:
Of course you can improve vastly over those that don’t take care of themselves.

But, you can’t deny that with age comes a decrease in ability to recover.[/quote]

Yes, but the question is at what age. I recover from a 4 hour 83km inline speed skate by following day. If you start young and never stop, the possiblities are endless. I don’t get stiff or sore from lifting weights either.


#7

[quote]streamline wrote:
jehovasfitness wrote:
Of course you can improve vastly over those that don’t take care of themselves.

But, you can’t deny that with age comes a decrease in ability to recover.

Yes, but the question is at what age. I recover from a 4 hour 83km inline speed skate by following day. If you start young and never stop, the possiblities are endless. I don’t get stiff or sore from lifting weights either.[/quote]

Yes, age makes it harder to recover, but not by much – at least comparing my workouts at age 41 versus 21. Proper sleep, nutrition and knowing my body (knowing what works and what doesn’t) have been keys to progress for me.

I like to surround myself with younger folks (in age and/or in attitude) in the gym and this motivates me to strive for goals that others may consider “unrealistic.”


#8

[quote]jehovasfitness wrote:
Of course you can improve vastly over those that don’t take care of themselves.

But, you can’t deny that with age comes a decrease in ability to recover.[/quote]

only in the bodies of those that believe that


#9

[quote]rohay wrote:
Yes, age makes it harder to recover, but not by much – at least comparing my workouts at age 41 versus 21. Proper sleep, nutrition and knowing my body (knowing what works and what doesn’t) have been keys to progress for me.

I like to surround myself with younger folks (in age and/or in attitude) in the gym and this motivates me to strive for goals that others may consider “unrealistic.”

[/quote]

X2