T Nation

After the 915 Program


#1

I'm starting to think about what I wanna do after completing the 915 program and would appreciate some feedback.

For deload I was thinking a large volume reduction. Basically I'm thinking I would do the workouts from week 1 of the program but only do a single set of all exercises. This would also mean a small reduction in intensity since I should be at least 10% stronger in the main lifts. Does this sound okay or should I focus mainly on intensity reduction for my deload?

After the deload I doing 3-4 week of lighter work as recommended in the article. I read an article by Meadows, Mountain dog training for intermediates, as a Meadows program was also suggested by CT, but had two basic problems with it. Firstly I was unsure why the core movement in the example chest workouts in the program was not the first exercise, but the second one. What is the advantage of this?

Secondly I couldn't figure out how many times in a week a bodypart should be trained. The article reads:

"For advanced trainees I often build five-day or even six-day training programs. Advanced athletes usually have their supplements and diets more dialed-in than intermediates, which is another factor that allows them to push harder and longer.

Intermediates will not train more than the standard four days per week. This helps build conditioning and develop good training and lifestyle habits."

Say I i'm and intermediate. Does this mean I should split the entire body out over the 4 days? Or should I train the body 2 times in a week?

If I decide that I want a heavier focus on losing bodyfat I might do a Vince Gironda-style 8x8 program, although I find the there is alot of contraditory information on the how to exactly perform this program. A lot of articles on the web outlines some of the principles of the program, and then procedes to present an example program that breaks these principles.
If someone on this forum has any credible knowledge on Girondas 8x8 program I would greatly appreciate your comments.

Sorry for the long post. I would appreciate feedback/comments on any parts of the questions.


#2

[quote]Braas wrote:
I’m starting to think about what I wanna do after completing the 915 program and would appreciate some feedback.

For deload I was thinking a large volume reduction. Basically I’m thinking I would do the workouts from week 1 of the program but only do a single set of all exercises. This would also mean a small reduction in intensity since I should be at least 10% stronger in the main lifts. Does this sound okay or should I focus mainly on intensity reduction for my deload?
[/quote]

You should focus on intensity reduction during the deload. I normally prefer to deload by reducing volume, but it’s mostly to peak your strength after the deload. With the 915 program you actually have a “built-in” volume deload at the end of the program to peak your strength so there is no need for further volume deloading. Since the program ends in maximal lifting, deloading with lighter work to give the joints and nervous system a break is the better solution.

I would recommend 14-21 days of lighter lifting, it’s time to focus on building mind-muscle connection and doing plenty of hypertrophy work for the muscles that are your weakest links in the big lifts.

[quote]Braas wrote:
After the deload I doing 3-4 week of lighter work as recommended in the article. I read an article by Meadows, Mountain dog training for intermediates, as a Meadows program was also suggested by CT, but had two basic problems with it. Firstly I was unsure why the core movement in the example chest workouts in the program was not the first exercise, but the second one. What is the advantage of this?
[/quote]

Go directly to this thing as I mentioned earlier. I like Meadows routines. However my best recommendation would be to simply do hypertrophy work focusing on your weakest body parts, those that are holding your big lifts back.

I suggest picking the body part that limits you in the bench press and the one limiting you in the deadlift and doing a spec program for these 2 muscles.

This means training these 2 muscle groups 3 times a week, and training the rest of the body in 1 or 2 sessions at a low volume.

Monday: Spec workout 1
Tuesday: OFF
Wednesday: Spec workout 2
Thursday: Rest of the body (1 exercise/body part, 4-6 sets)
Friday: OFF
Saturday: Spec workout 3
Sunday: OFF


#3

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:
Go directly to this thing as I mentioned earlier. I like Meadows routines. However my best recommendation would be to simply do hypertrophy work focusing on your weakest body parts, those that are holding your big lifts back.

I suggest picking the body part that limits you in the bench press and the one limiting you in the deadlift and doing a spec program for these 2 muscles.

This means training these 2 muscle groups 3 times a week, and training the rest of the body in 1 or 2 sessions at a low volume.

Monday: Spec workout 1
Tuesday: OFF
Wednesday: Spec workout 2
Thursday: Rest of the body (1 exercise/body part, 4-6 sets)
Friday: OFF
Saturday: Spec workout 3
Sunday: OFF[/quote]

When you refer to lighter lifting, do you mean 7-10 reps? Saw you refer to this as your “zone 3” somewhere, and no zones of higher reps than this were mentioned at that time.

How much volume should the spec workouts consist of? More precisely, how many total sets per muscle group and how many exercises should these sets be spread over? And should I use the same rep range for each of these exercises or is there a benefit to using different rep ranges in this phase?
Personally I like the idea of 7-10 reps. I’m thinking that the higher the reps, the less transfer the training has to low rep training. Is this a correct assumption?

Thank you for your advice and let me say that I think the 915 program is brilliant.


#4

[quote]Braas wrote:

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:
Go directly to this thing as I mentioned earlier. I like Meadows routines. However my best recommendation would be to simply do hypertrophy work focusing on your weakest body parts, those that are holding your big lifts back.

I suggest picking the body part that limits you in the bench press and the one limiting you in the deadlift and doing a spec program for these 2 muscles.

This means training these 2 muscle groups 3 times a week, and training the rest of the body in 1 or 2 sessions at a low volume.

Monday: Spec workout 1
Tuesday: OFF
Wednesday: Spec workout 2
Thursday: Rest of the body (1 exercise/body part, 4-6 sets)
Friday: OFF
Saturday: Spec workout 3
Sunday: OFF[/quote]

When you refer to lighter lifting, do you mean 7-10 reps? Saw you refer to this as your “zone 3” somewhere, and no zones of higher reps than this were mentioned at that time.

How much volume should the spec workouts consist of? More precisely, how many total sets per muscle group and how many exercises should these sets be spread over? And should I use the same rep range for each of these exercises or is there a benefit to using different rep ranges in this phase?
Personally I like the idea of 7-10 reps. I’m thinking that the higher the reps, the less transfer the training has to low rep training. Is this a correct assumption?

Thank you for your advice and let me say that I think the 915 program is brilliant.

[/quote]

I’m personally not someone who uses reps higher than 10 (and even that’s very rare) except for isolation exercises. 7-10 would be fine for “lighter work”. And yes, the further away you are from a 1RM weight, the harder it is to transfer the strength gains. You will grow muscle, but it will take some time with heavy lifting to become efficient at utilizing that muscle in a maximal effort.


#5

Great I’ll use the 7-10 rep range then. Should I aim for around 10 work sets per muscle group in the spec workouts?


#6

[quote]Braas wrote:
Great I’ll use the 7-10 rep range then. Should I aim for around 10 work sets per muscle group in the spec workouts? [/quote]

8-10 for larger muscle groups, 6-8 for smaller ones seems about right


#7

Ok so a sample spec for the delts and quads might look like this

Squat 5x7-10
Front squat 3x7-10
Leg extensions 2x11-14

Military press 4x7-10
Seated DB shoulder Press 2x7-10


#8

Hello :slight_smile:

I have/ had also the question what to do after the 915 program.

Although the specialization approache is very interesting, I was thinking about your approche for maximum muscularity ( ct’s log page 38 or 37,39).

Example of a day (from CT log )
DAY 1
A. Back squat
5 sets of 3-5 reps using the double progression method

B. Front squat with heels elevated
3 sets of 6-8 reps using the double progression method

C. Bulgarian split squat
3 sets of 6-8 reps/leg using the double progression method

D1. Leg extension 8-12 reps
D2. Lying leg curl 8-12 reps
D3. Hip thrust (I like kneeling hip thrust with band) 8-12 reps

Done as a circuit 3-4 times

That should be a good workout for the time between my 915 cycles?
A last question (for this week :stuck_out_tongue: ) after exercise C is it a good idea to use your main exercise (A) again
for high reps or density? (E.g. 3*10 or 5min 70% reps) and after it you continue with D .

Thanks for answers
And a special (ultimate thank) thank to Christian Thibaudea for sharing his knowledge and wisdom. I have learned so much already.