T Nation

Advice on this Workout

I was wondering what you guys think of this full body routine.
Squats, 5 sets of 10 to a top set of 10
Deadlifts, 5 sets of 3 to a top set of 3
Dips 4 sets, 20-25 reps, add weight when body weight is easy.
Rows 6 sets to a top set of 10

Workout B (warm ups are included)

Bench press/incline press (alternate these two from workout to workout on this day), 6 sets to a top set of 8
Over Head Press 5 sets to a top set of 6
Bent Over Rows, 6 sets to a top set of 10
Curls, 3 sets of 8

Its clean and press instead of OHP on the second workout.

How often is this repeated and what does the progression look like?

It three time per week, ABA then BAB. Monday , Wednesday, Friday.

Progression:“Add a rep each week to your top set until youâ??re getting two more reps than listed. Then up the weight by 5 percent for the next workout”

Squats and deadlifts on the same day is a good way to get injured if you aren’t experienced. I would at least put deadlifts on the B day as the first exercise and get rid of the repeat rows workout. I also strongly advise you to bring a notebook and write down your progress for the aforementioned type of progression you are using; it is easy to forget how one performs week after week.

Aero: Starting strength and Strong lifts both have novices making progress on deadlifts and squats multiple times a week. The squats and deadlifts on the same day is fine.

I just don’t understand your reasoning behind most of it. Why is everything going to a top set? Especially when you’re doing bench and overhead pressing on the same day? Or Squats and DLs on the same day. And why so many sets?

"Aero: Starting strength and Strong lifts both have novices making progress on deadlifts and squats multiple times a week. The squats and deadlifts on the same day is fine. "

Yeah, and a good fraction of those programs are misleading. It is pretty easy to progress multiple times a week and avoid injury when you are only squatting 95lbs and deadlifting 135lbs. I firmly believe that if you are going to do those movements which are so taxing on your lower back than you should be proficient in form with a sufficient level of strength before proceeding to squat and deadlift on the same day. Need I not mention one needs experience to “learn your limits” so a lifter can exercise within a regime that is both safe and effective. Too frequently new lifters do not understand their limits and they end up hurting themselves because of this.

As I said earlier, the deadlift and squat are both very technical lifts that require perfect form. The probability of someone maintaining good form after being fatigued decreases dramatically, especially in a beginner. Squatting will fatigue the lower back and has a chance of compromising form. The OP is also performing more than one set of the deadlift after the squat, which is not done in SL5x5.

It is for these reasons that I think squatting and deadlifting on the same day for someone who is inexperienced is a bad idea. Unless this person has a coach or the aforementioned experienced they will probably injure themselves. I think it would be wise to perform sets of singles for the deadlift with short rest periods too, just to emphasize form. An example would be:
Deadlift

10x1@75%1RM

1x75%
reset
1x75%
reset
1x75%
etc…

By resetting after each rep, you have the opportunity to check yourself with each lift and ensure that you can perform the next rep without risk of injury. If you have to take more than 20-30 seconds to rest, then you are most likely done for the day.

[quote]Aero51 wrote:
It is pretty easy to progress multiple times a week and avoid injury when you are only squatting 95lbs and deadlifting 135lbs.

It is for these reasons that I think squatting and deadlifting on the same day for someone who is inexperienced is a bad idea. Unless this person has a coach or the aforementioned experienced they will probably injure themselves.

[/quote]

I am actually curious how you reconcile having these two thoughts.

I generally feel that form is way overemphasized for beginners honestly, and think that more time spent going balls to the wall and letting form drift would actually result in way better results, but I tend to be in the minority there.

If a lifter follows either starting strength or stronglifts to the letter, there is no chacne of them going so far passed their limits as a beginner that they get injured. With stronglifts you start with just the bar on squats and 95lbs for deadlifts. Starting strength has you start at weights where your bar speed starts to slow. The only way to dial in solid technique at heavy weights is to lift heavy weights.